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Racism - It's a real thing.

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21 hours ago, BigRedBuster said:

 

This POS deserves everything he gets.  I loved watching the second video with his nice little umbrella protecting him.  He isn't quite the tough guy today compared to yesterday.

 

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Racist lawyer Aaron Schlossberg will have to find new office space — and an attorney of his own.

The 44-year-old was kicked out of his Madison Avenue work space Thursday after he was was captured in a hate-filled rant at Spanish-speaking restaurant workers — and then a Congressman filed a formal complaint to the state court system’s disciplinary committee.

Schlossberg had been using a business center in 275 Madison Ave. as an office address for his private law firm — but has been given the boot over the shocking video that went viral Wednesday.

 

He's lost his office and now there's a push to get his license revoked.

 

https://nypost.com/2018/05/17/racist-lawyer-kicked-out-of-his-office-space/

 

Also, this was not his first bout of public racism caught on film:

 

https://heavy.com/news/2018/05/aaron-schlossberg/

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10 minutes ago, sho said:

 

 

He's lost his office and now there's a push to get his license revoked.

 

https://nypost.com/2018/05/17/racist-lawyer-kicked-out-of-his-office-space/

 

Also, this was not his first bout of public racism caught on film:

 

https://heavy.com/news/2018/05/aaron-schlossberg/

maybe if he had taken his gun out and shot someone he could have been elected president.  

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43 minutes ago, sho said:

 

 

He's lost his office and now there's a push to get his license revoked.

 

https://nypost.com/2018/05/17/racist-lawyer-kicked-out-of-his-office-space/

 

Also, this was not his first bout of public racism caught on film:

 

https://heavy.com/news/2018/05/aaron-schlossberg/

This guy has major issues that go far beyond just simple racism. 

 

If you notice, in all those videos, he is with a lot of the same people out supporting Trump protesting foreigners.

 

He's obviously part of a group that does this.

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3 hours ago, BigRedBuster said:

This guy has major issues that go far beyond just simple racism. 

 

If you notice, in all those videos, he is with a lot of the same people out supporting Trump protesting foreigners.

 

He's obviously part of a group that does this.

 

What in the world is wrong with him? He's got a lot of hate & anger in his heart, based on that article. Seems like there is a hole in his life that he is trying to fill with Trumpism & hate of people who aren't like him.

 

Still, he seems like your run of the mill Breitbart, Trump-loving Republican. These are the elements the GOP has coddled for far too long with dogwhistles to get votes.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Clifford Franklin said:

 

What in the world is wrong with him? He's got a lot of hate & anger in his heart, based on that article. Seems like there is a hole in his life that he is trying to fill with Trumpism & hate of people who aren't like him.

 

Still, he seems like your run of the mill Breitbart, Trump-loving Republican. These are the elements the GOP has coddled for far too long with dogwhistles to get votes.

 

 

Actually, I live in central Nebraska where I’m an extreme minority when I don’t support Trump. 

 

This is NOT your run of the mill Trump supporter. 

 

This is is the very ugly extreme side that Trump has emboldened.....not the norm. 

 

 

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23 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

Actually, I live in central Nebraska where I’m an extreme minority when I don’t support Trump. 

 

This is NOT your run of the mill Trump supporter. 

 

This is is the very ugly extreme side that Trump has emboldened.....not the norm. 

 

 

 

I guess when I said that, I meant more run of the mill Breitbart Republican than Trump-loving supporter. I figured the latter necessarily follows the first. 

But good call. They're not necessarily mutually exclusive.

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I'm not sure if this is racist, but it's certainly profoundly stupid.

 

I'm getting really tired of my fellow white guys acting like pompous, victimized a-holes. But Trump's America has unleashed a whole new level of white folks looking around and saying "But what about MY problems?" Not in a "let's help everyone" kind of way, either. More like a "we've been forgotten & abused & we have to take back what's rightfully ours from other groups of people" kind of way.

 

 

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^ all that is is a difference on whether or not identity politics or broad brush categorizing are good or bad. There's a popular wave of theory in center-right and libertarian esque camps that the problems to societal inequalities is a psychological one that's from the bottom up one person at a time, not a sociological culture-wide top-down one.

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23 hours ago, Landlord said:

^ all that is is a difference on whether or not identity politics or broad brush categorizing are good or bad. There's a popular wave of theory in center-right and libertarian esque camps that the problems to societal inequalities is a psychological one that's from the bottom up one person at a time, not a sociological culture-wide top-down one.

 

I get that. I think the debate about collective solutions vs. individualism is both valid & important to have. 

The reason I don't subscribe too heavily to the individualist side of the debate is because it seems to me that the most eager Libertarian & individualist voices are typically people who strike me as being born on second or third base.

 

They don't typically acknowledge that we all start from different starting lines in life, which is a belief that I hold very deeply. 

Of course lassiez faire individualism is a good deal for such folks. They have (and likely have had, throughout their lives) greater access to resources than others.

I'm probably broad-brushing a good deal here, but it's just how I view things. I think we should work on creating a level playing field for more people so the individualism part works more equitably, but that isn't a goal these folks would likely share.

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I agree with most of that sentiment, @Clifford Franklin. It's tough, though, because just because someone is born on 2nd base doesn't mean that their perspective on how people striking out at the plate can succeed is necessarily wrong. 

 

An overly simplistic but useful way to think about the problem, I think, is that expecting success by working your ass off might not guarantee success if you're starting from a much less advantaged socio-context, but not working your ass off will certainly guarantee failure.

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24 minutes ago, Landlord said:

I agree with most of that sentiment, @Clifford Franklin. It's tough, though, because just because someone is born on 2nd base doesn't mean that their perspective on how people striking out at the plate can succeed is necessarily wrong. 

 

An overly simplistic but useful way to think about the problem, I think, is that expecting success by working your ass off might not guarantee success if you're starting from a much less advantaged socio-context, but not working your ass off will certainly guarantee failure.

 

Agreed. You're absolutely right that individual effort & drive to succeed is important. Particularly if you're one of those folks who is starting worse off because you've got to offset your inherent disadvantage. 

I just the two groups could meet halfway. If the individualists wouldn't be so vehemently opposed to certain government programs that help level the playing field, I'd be way more receptive to their ideas about fostering personal responsibility & self-reliance. But they almost always push those ideas at the expense of programs that help disadvantaged people. I just don't get why people have to be so militant about it being an either-or situation.

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11 hours ago, Clifford Franklin said:

 

Agreed. You're absolutely right that individual effort & drive to succeed is important. Particularly if you're one of those folks who is starting worse off because you've got to offset your inherent disadvantage. 

I just the two groups could meet halfway. If the individualists wouldn't be so vehemently opposed to certain government programs that help level the playing field, I'd be way more receptive to their ideas about fostering personal responsibility & self-reliance. But they almost always push those ideas at the expense of programs that help disadvantaged people. I just don't get why people have to be so militant about it being an either-or situation.

What individualists don't consider is many people haven't been taught how to be an individual. Programs that level the playing field can teach people about self reliance. We don't teach taxes in school, personal finance isn't a requirement, no one teaches you about fostering creativity and developing a drive to succeed. If people aren't taught at home or at school how to succeed, they may have a hard time figuring it out.

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12 hours ago, Clifford Franklin said:

 

Agreed. You're absolutely right that individual effort & drive to succeed is important. Particularly if you're one of those folks who is starting worse off because you've got to offset your inherent disadvantage. 

I just the two groups could meet halfway. If the individualists wouldn't be so vehemently opposed to certain government programs that help level the playing field, I'd be way more receptive to their ideas about fostering personal responsibility & self-reliance. But they almost always push those ideas at the expense of programs that help disadvantaged people. I just don't get why people have to be so militant about it being an either-or situation.

There is absolutely no reason why we shouldn't demand programs that allow people to level the playing field AND....expect people to have a certain level of motivation to actually do what it takes to support themselves and take personal responsibility to take advantage of those programs to better themselves.  Too often excuses are made instead of actually going out and doing something to help yourself out.

 

41 minutes ago, Nebfanatic said:

What individualists don't consider is many people haven't been taught how to be an individual. Programs that level the playing field can teach people about self reliance. We don't teach taxes in school, personal finance isn't a requirement, no one teaches you about fostering creativity and developing a drive to succeed. If people aren't taught at home or at school how to succeed, they may have a hard time figuring it out.

 

I don't agree with this.  In our small little class C1 school, kids have the opportunity to take accounting classes, entrepreneurship, art, music, wood working classes, welding classes, be involved in FCCLA, FBLA, speech, drama, FFA, sports....etc..... that covers personal finance, creativity, responsibility, work ethic.....etc.  And....this is all with extreme budget cuts from the state.

 

Problem is, so many kids don't learn this AT HOME!!!!.  A football coach can't instill work ethic and personal responsibility if the parents don't foster that.  A band instructor or drama teacher can't foster creativity if the parents act like those activities are dumb and worthless.

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22 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

There is absolutely no reason why we shouldn't demand programs that allow people to level the playing field AND....expect people to have a certain level of motivation to actually do what it takes to support themselves and take personal responsibility to take advantage of those programs to better themselves.  Too often excuses are made instead of actually going out and doing something to help yourself out.

 

 

I don't agree with this.  In our small little class C1 school, kids have the opportunity to take accounting classes, entrepreneurship, art, music, wood working classes, welding classes, be involved in FCCLA, FBLA, speech, drama, FFA, sports....etc..... that covers personal finance, creativity, responsibility, work ethic.....etc.  And....this is all with extreme budget cuts from the state.

 

Problem is, so many kids don't learn this AT HOME!!!!.  A football coach can't instill work ethic and personal responsibility if the parents don't foster that.  A band instructor or drama teacher can't foster creativity if the parents act like those activities are dumb and worthless.

Ehhh, I disagree with you. Maybe its the style things are taught in but school does a terrible job of teaching about real life problem solving and overcoming failure. They don't teach you about using your sexual energy in your creative endeavors or how to get into flow states where you let go of logic and create. They don't teach taxes(the single most atrocious diservice) or the power of positive thinking. These things are secrets to most for a reason, our education is failing in some way. I don't think the teachers are necissarily to blame, but I think we need to rethink how we teach our children.

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24 minutes ago, Nebfanatic said:

Ehhh, I disagree with you. Maybe its the style things are taught in but school does a terrible job of teaching about real life problem solving and overcoming failure. They don't teach you about using your sexual energy in your creative endeavors or how to get into flow states where you let go of logic and create. They don't teach taxes(the single most atrocious diservice) or the power of positive thinking. These things are secrets to most for a reason, our education is failing in some way. I don't think the teachers are necissarily to blame, but I think we need to rethink how we teach our children.

Is it really the school system's job to teach people to use their "sexual energy"?  Really???

 

Our kids are needing to compete globally against kids who are in school systems that do great in teaching math, science...etc.  I believe THAT needs to be number one job of the school system.

 

I personally believe that, sure, our schools could be improved....always can be.  But, our public school system is no where close to as bad as some people try to make it out to be.  The US has a much much different attitude towards education from other countries.  Our goal is to educate everyone.  That isn't that way in countries like China where their goal is only to educate the top students.  

 

Where we are failing is in our culture and families around our educational system.  Every parent should expect nothing less than maximum effort from our kids in school and teach them to be respectable.  If every kid would come to school well prepared to learn, it would be amazing what our school systems could do.

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7 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

Is it really the school system's job to teach people to use their "sexual energy"?  Really???

 

Our kids are needing to compete globally against kids who are in school systems that do great in teaching math, science...etc.  I believe THAT needs to be number one job of the school system.

 

I personally believe that, sure, our schools could be improved....always can be.  But, our public school system is no where close to as bad as some people try to make it out to be.  The US has a much much different attitude towards education from other countries.  Our goal is to educate everyone.  That isn't that way in countries like China where their goal is only to educate the top students.  

 

Where we are failing is in our culture and families around our educational system.  Every parent should expect nothing less than maximum effort from our kids in school and teach them to be respectable.  If every kid would come to school well prepared to learn, it would be amazing what our school systems could do.

Why shouldn't we be teaching that? It is a huge part of everyones life. Oh yea lets let people educate themselves so they think smashing genitals with no protection is all their sexual energy is good for. Sexual energy is the lifeblood of genius. Why shouldn't we be teaching children to use their energy to achieve a higher frequency of thought rather than let them think physical expression is the only way to use their energy. I take it you haven't read the incredible book Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill. Your not wrong in that we do a decent job at teaching things that can be measured by test scores and compared to the rest of the world, but what I am suggesting is maybe that isn't the best method to prepare our children for success going forward.

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And to bring this back around to racism, @BigRedBuster says its the parents responsibility to teach their kids alot of these things, and while I don't entirely disagree with that, its difficult when the government takes away the head of these families for generations. From slavery to mass incarceration, the US has always found ways to drive wedges between families in the African American community, then we blame the parents for not teaching their kids what they need to know. 

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2 minutes ago, Nebfanatic said:

Why shouldn't we be teaching that? It is a huge part of everyones life. Oh yea lets let people educate themselves so they think smashing genitals with no protection is all their sexual energy is good for. Sexual energy is the lifeblood of genius. Why shouldn't we be teaching children to use their energy to achieve a higher frequency of thought rather than let them think physical expression is the only way to use their energy. I take it you haven't read the incredible book Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill. Your not wrong in that we do a decent job at teaching things that can be measured by test scores and compared to the rest of the world, but what I am suggesting is maybe that isn't the best method to prepare our children for success going forward.

 

And, I'm not saying reaching the highest level of thought isn't very important.  We need to strive for that every chance we can.


However, I'm saying that's a cultural and family issue more than a school issue.  My youngest son just graduated from HS.  We have had many conversations about why he was successful in getting good grades, getting into the school he wants, getting the scholarship he wants...etc.  You know what he says his friends do every night?  They go home, sit in their rooms for 4-5 hours LITERALLY....and play Fortnight.  Really?  What the hell kind of parent even allows their kid to do that?  I've told my son that I would be so friggen pissed off if he did that and he totally agrees with me.


THESE are the types of things that hold kids back from taking advantage of opportunities that are already available.  

What if those kids were putting that much time into learning how to play the piano or painting a picture or creative photography....etc.?  My son is really into hunting and fishing.  So, he spends a lot of time creatively thinking about fishing and new ways to get better at it.  No, it's not 

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8 minutes ago, Nebfanatic said:

And to bring this back around to racism, @BigRedBuster says its the parents responsibility to teach their kids alot of these things, and while I don't entirely disagree with that, its difficult when the government takes away the head of these families for generations. From slavery to mass incarceration, the US has always found ways to drive wedges between families in the African American community, then we blame the parents for not teaching their kids what they need to know. 

 

That is a problem and why I said earlier that this problem needs to be approached from both sides.

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5 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

 

That is a problem and why I said earlier that this problem needs to be approached from both sides.

Don't disagree with that at all. Parents bear some responsibility, but the fact is the parents aren't always there so maybe we should rethink how we teach children.

 

Taxes should be taught. Sex ed should be taught, and just imagine if we taught kids to approach their sexual urges as energy that can be used towards a goal rather than just a sexual urge to be expressed physically.

 

I don't think we should abandon curriculum, but maybe adjust how we teach it to allow kids to think in more positive, long term, big picture state of mind. Teach kids to approach what they do as a craft. Its not huge, but a shift in attitude towards how we teach can shift how the kids recieve the info.

 

Home life is important to being excited for school as well no doubt, but if they don't learn at home and they don't learn at school, they won't teach their children and the cycle continues.

 

We need to find a way to educate more people on more than just math, science and literature. 

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7 minutes ago, Nebfanatic said:

Don't disagree with that at all. Parents bear some responsibility, but the fact is the parents aren't always there so maybe we should rethink how we teach children.

 

Taxes should be taught. Sex ed should be taught, and just imagine if we taught kids to approach their sexual urges as energy that can be used towards a goal rather than just a sexual urge to be expressed physically.

 

I don't think we should abandon curriculum, but maybe adjust how we teach it to allow kids to think in more positive, long term, big picture state of mind. Teach kids to approach what they do as a craft. Its not huge, but a shift in attitude towards how we teach can shift how the kids recieve the info.

 

Home life is important to being excited for school as well no doubt, but if they don't learn at home and they don't learn at school, they won't teach their children and the cycle continues.

 

We need to find a way to educate more people on more than just math, science and literature. 

I think you are greatly understating the opportunities kids have in our current school systems for this that many/most students aren't taking advantage of.

 

I had read an article years ago about how even though Chinese students were coming out of school with these amazing test scores, businesses were not willing to hire them for positions where creative problem solving was required....and they were opting for American kids.

 

Here's an article on this subject and the problem with the Chinese schools.

 

LINK

 

I've said all along that there can always be improvement.  However, opportunities are there if kids are motivated to take advantage of them.  Most kids don't.

 

PS....OK...I'm not going to argue about having a Tax class.  If you say that would save America...great.  I'm all for it.  

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2 minutes ago, teachercd said:

LOVE IT!

 

Sigmund!!!!  There are no accidents!  

That is more Freuds interpretation of the phenomenon, Hill calls it sexual transmutation and puts more mystical connotations around it. Many others throughout history have written about the phenomenon.

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34 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

However, I'm saying that's a cultural and family issue more than a school issue.  My youngest son just graduated from HS.  We have had many conversations about why he was successful in getting good grades, getting into the school he wants, getting the scholarship he wants...etc.  You know what he says his friends do every night?  They go home, sit in their rooms for 4-5 hours LITERALLY....and play Fortnight.  Really?  

 

 

Think of the point of overlap there to be a redundancy backup where the school either gives refreshers and reaffirmation of topics already covered well in the home by parents, or gives new and unknown insight into life for the kids without any parents, with bad parents, with a single parent who's working 4 jobs, etc.

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And...for the record, I believe we rely way too much on test scores as a judge of how good a school is doing (or student).  I'm not for getting rid of them, because learning things like science, math and language is important for a kid to be successful.  But, it should just be a part of what is looked at.

However, as an example, I have a real problem with how much colleges use test scores to judge a student for admittance or scholarships.

 

My kids have never been great at taking standardized tests.  My oldest got a high of 22 on her ACT.  She is headed to dental school after getting a 4.0 in undergrad.  My second had a high of 25 on the ACT, went to Nebraska and received NOTHING in scholarships at UNL with above a 4.0 in HS and top in her class.  She still has a 4.0 going into her junior year and is being highly recommended by her professors for grad school.

 

Both of these kids were passed up by many schools top programs because their ACT scores weren't good enough.  BUT....they excelled in other areas that have made them successful.

 

How many minority kids are held back simply because they didn't get a high enough test score to get a scholarship to further their education?

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Chinese schools adopt an American approach

 

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HEFEI, China -- Some of China's children are now being taught in a style that's more typically American.

Beijing elementary school students are back in the classroom. And whether they know it or not, their education is about to filled with grueling exams that will determine their future. 

"Memorizing a lot of information doesn't necessarily lead to creativity or problem solving skills," says Boston College Professor Mike Barnett. 

The Chinese government has recruited Barnett to help.

"They're seeing a lot of what their students produce is kind of imitation in nature, as opposed to innovation in nature," he says. 

Barnett doesn't use textbooks. Instead, he teaches students to think and reason using real-life problems. His methods are used in 500 schools across the U.S.

 

 

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17 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

And...for the record, I believe we rely way too much on test scores as a judge of how good a school is doing (or student).  I'm not for getting rid of them, because learning things like science, math and language is important for a kid to be successful.  But, it should just be a part of what is looked at.

However, as an example, I have a real problem with how much colleges use test scores to judge a student for admittance or scholarships.

 

My kids have never been great at taking standardized tests.  My oldest got a high of 22 on her ACT.  She is headed to dental school after getting a 4.0 in undergrad.  My second had a high of 25 on the ACT, went to Nebraska and received NOTHING in scholarships at UNL with above a 4.0 in HS and top in her class.  She still has a 4.0 going into her junior year and is being highly recommended by her professors for grad school.

 

Both of these kids were passed up by many schools top programs because their ACT scores weren't good enough.  BUT....they excelled in other areas that have made them successful.

 

How many minority kids are held back simply because they didn't get a high enough test score to get a scholarship to further their education?

This is kinda what I'm talking about. I'm not suggesting we don't teach math, science, ect. But we need to shift the way we teach. We put to much emphasis on test scores and teaching to the test. I think we should look at teaching in more practical ways and using testing as a gauge of what needs to be taught rather than a goal to achieve a perfect score.

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11 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

Just because we are further along than China doesn't mean we can't be better. Obviously Chinas methods weren't terribly successful. A rigid logical approach doesn't lend itself to originality. The more childlike and novel you make the learning experience, the more impactful it will be. 

 

Its not are we better than China, its are we adequetly preparing our children for life. 

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BRB, your kid must do pretty good on tests to score well enough on the DAT (Is that what it is) for Dental School!  That test has beaten down so many people!

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1 hour ago, teachercd said:

BRB, your kid must do pretty good on tests to score well enough on the DAT (Is that what it is) for Dental School!  That test has beaten down so many people!

Because of other things than her ACT, she was able to get into the RHOP program.  She then went to undergrad and ended up being the only one in her program to graduate with a 4.0.  If she did that, she was guaranteed a spot in Dental School with a good score on the DAT.  She didn't need to go into it and do fantastic on it.  She did decent.  But, if she was't in the RHOP program, she would have been sweating getting in.

 

In other words, relatively speaking, she did better on the DAT than the ACT.  But, she still didn't do fantastic on it.

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On 7/12/2018 at 2:08 PM, BigRedBuster said:

 

Good, watching that video, I kept wondering why the cop was doing nothing.  He failed to serve and protect and I'm glad he's no longer a police officer.

 

Related, the guy has been charged with a hate crime today as well.    Grateful there was a camera to record this so the spineless cop and the a&&hole old man can get the punishment they deserve.

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48 minutes ago, sho said:

Good, watching that video, I kept wondering why the cop was doing nothing.  He failed to serve and protect and I'm glad he's no longer a police officer.

 

Related, the guy has been charged with a hate crime today as well.    Grateful there was a camera to record this so the spineless cop and the a&&hole old man can get the punishment they deserve.

 

I was very happy to see them bring hate crime charges. Of course, it probably only happened because this occurred in deep blue Chicago.

 

Regardless, you're right. I was struck when someone mentioned after this incident that there likely wouldn't have been any consequences for either the racist or the cop had there been no camera.

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On 7/12/2018 at 1:08 PM, BigRedBuster said:

 

 

If I was that officer's Chief of Police, as soon as I saw that video, I'd a fired him on the spot for dereliction of duty.  

 

In the video, the racist asks the woman, "Are you educated?"  Ironic, since he doesn't even know Puerto Rico is a US territory.

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Arrest made in racially charged vandalism on Ogden Ave.

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TOLEDO, Ohio (WTVG) - Toledo police arrested Patricia Edelen for spray painting racial slurs on her neighbor's home Friday night.

...

The police report lists the charges as "ethnic intimidation by reason of race, color, religion or national origin, criminal mischief, and criminal damaging/endangering property to cause/create substantial risk of physical harm."

 

The police report says Edelen spray painted "N" (word) stay out" "Hail Trump" and a Swastika on her neighbor's home.

 

 

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Sisters arrested after apparent racially motivated attack caught on video

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COMMERCE CITY, Colo. — A video showing two sisters racially harassing a Hispanic family in Commerce City has gone viral.

In the video, the women can be seen attacking one of the female family members.

The sisters, Natasha and Shala Fross, 26, were arrested and are facing assault and bias-motivated crime charges.

One can see and hear the women yelling racial insults at the Hispanic family in the video. Juan Carlos Ruiz, who videotaped the incident, said the Fross sisters grabbed his mother by the hair and hit his sister.

 

 

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