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DaveH

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Everything posted by DaveH

  1. I think you have enough control to not land people in the hospital. That's all. I'm sure they'll learn. They have to.
  2. Not put kids in the hospital and, instead, design a program that allows them to train productively. I really don't think it's that big of an ask and they'd probably agree.
  3. I struggle to see how the game of football, where there are risks you can't really mitigate, is the same as training, where you certainly have control over all the variables that affect the outcome and can mitigate these risks. These are not the same things.
  4. I feel like if it could land people in the hospital, it's probably a bad idea. And we pay these guys a lot of money to know this. Bottom line is, this was a very bad mistake and should never happen again. There is just no excuse for it. It's not as if guys get rhabdo all the time and it's a completely normal outcome of hard training
  5. Isn't that what this board is for? Opining on things that you are not qualified for is a past time on the internet
  6. I don't have the details of the training so I can't really say what specifically I'd do differently. Nor am I really qualified to do that. I would say that I really don't think this situation should be a variable when designing a program. The state of D1 strength and conditioning in general needs to improve such that we shouldn't be left wondering if a workout will land people in the hospital.
  7. Sure it sounds like they tried but think about it this way. If something would have really gone bad and a player was unable to play again or his life was otherwise permanently effected, would the answer of "well, we tried" be good enough? When it comes down to it, there's really no excuse. Hopefully they learned something.
  8. Good call. I hear ya. I guess I'm not so sure about the necessity of the risk I guess. I'd think you'd be able to program at any level without a significantly elevated risk of hospitalization. Maybe part of this is programming for individuals vs programming for the whole team at once. You're sort of assuming, by programming for the whole team or at least wide swaths of people, that they're at similar levels of training already. Due to time constraints that I'm sure exist here, programming individually may not be practical, but maybe it is. Yea, I think it would for sure.
  9. Sure, I just thought it was funny that the guy in the tweet called them "heavy"
  10. Interesting.. I think that if you're able to do three sets of 10 reps on a squat, it wasn't that heavy. Or you're squatting high.
  11. I generally agree, but I think maybe they found a hint where this line lies for some. I hope they have some copious notes with regard to what led up to this. That being said, I don't think productive training requires knowing where this line is. I have a feeling that approaching this line doesn't really help elicit the adaptation you're looking for and more than staying a good distance away. I'd only additionally mention that while yes, some muscle damage is a result of productive training, muscle destruction is not. The -lysis in Rhabdomyolysis almost literally means death or at least leading to cell death. It would be good to stay away from that
  12. Here's the difference. You must accept some of the risks you cited if you want to play high level football. There's no real way around it that I can see You do not need to and should not be expected to accept the risk of rhabdo if you want to train. You don't need to train so hard that parts of you *literally* die.
  13. True! It's almost like training is a process full of many individual sessions. Each designed to help produce the desired adaptation.... hmm..
  14. Thanks for the update. This is sort of odd. We'll have to keep an eye on it.
  15. I haven't looked for any, so I'm not sure. However, unfortunately it's not as simple as this workout = rhabdo.
  16. yea, the real problem is that guys were put in the hospital instead of being able to train more today.
  17. I don't think I'd necessarily correlate an arbitrary award to being a good programmer.
  18. You don't get rhabdo from "simple" lifting sessions.
  19. I'm not trying to kick the guys out of town. I just hope they take this as seriously as they should. Not only is this a bad look, it could be indicative of bad programming or bad supervision
  20. The thing here is that the idea that these guys could get even remotely *close* to rhabdo suggests that the programming is inappropriate. How many players did not technically have rhabdo, but were close? These kids are hand picked athletes, so as usual their natural ability will cover up the BS that is prescribed to them. Sure, I get it when some CrossFit hero at your local box gets rhabdo because his dime store coach doesn't know what he's doing. But we pay these guys a TON of money. We should expect better and so should their parents.
  21. Guys, this is completely unacceptable. Rhabdo is not a joking matter. You're supposed to be training these guys, not putting them in the hospital.
  22. Preach. I heard that a few guys got rhabdo here recently. This is not good, gentlemen. Not good at all.
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