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DT Ron Coleman

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Name: Ron Coleman

HS: Omaha North

Position: DT

Ht: 6'0''

Wt: 260

40: 4.75

Visit Date: Big Red Camp

Scholarships: North Dakota State, UNO

Favorites: Alabama, Nebraska, Kansas, Kansas State, Iowa, Iowa State, Notre Dame, Wisconsin

 

COMMITTED TO SOUTHEAST MISSOURI STATE

 

Rivals: :star:star

Scout:

ESPN:

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I think he plays D line as well. He and Giles were quite a thunder and lightning combo this year.

 

Don't forget he won state wrestling too!

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I think he plays D line as well. He and Giles were quite a thunder and lightning combo this year.

 

Don't forget he won state wrestling too!

 

yes he plays DT, and probably is better at that than RB/FB, he gets tired on both offense and defense and has to take breathers (at least when I saw him, but it was cold that day), so don't if it is only because he plays both sides or if he just can't get in good enough shape

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Trust me, if Ron Coleman wants to come to Nebraska, there will be a spot for him. He is an absolute freak, and will have quite an impressive scholarship list when it is all said and done. Keep in mind, he also plays d-line.

 

Where would he play? He isn't 6 feet from everything I have heard, so unless he is Sedrick Ellis reincarnated, the likelihood he plays DT is slim. We are short on schollies next year, so do we offer another guy who will play fullback in an offense that does not use it all that much now?

 

Coleman is a good player, no doubt, but not necessarily our type of player for next recruiting season. JMO.

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Trust me, if Ron Coleman wants to come to Nebraska, there will be a spot for him. He is an absolute freak, and will have quite an impressive scholarship list when it is all said and done. Keep in mind, he also plays d-line.

 

Where would he play? He isn't 6 feet from everything I have heard, so unless he is Sedrick Ellis reincarnated, the likelihood he plays DT is slim. We are short on schollies next year, so do we offer another guy who will play fullback in an offense that does not use it all that much now?

 

Coleman is a good player, no doubt, but not necessarily our type of player for next recruiting season. JMO.

Willie, I agree that he doesn't exactly fit us to a T, but keep in mind that Bo has used shorter defensive linemen before. I hope that we pursue him to the fullest, because I personally think he is simply the best football player in the state for the 2010 class.

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Trust me, if Ron Coleman wants to come to Nebraska, there will be a spot for him. He is an absolute freak, and will have quite an impressive scholarship list when it is all said and done. Keep in mind, he also plays d-line.

 

Where would he play? He isn't 6 feet from everything I have heard, so unless he is Sedrick Ellis reincarnated, the likelihood he plays DT is slim. We are short on schollies next year, so do we offer another guy who will play fullback in an offense that does not use it all that much now?

 

Coleman is a good player, no doubt, but not necessarily our type of player for next recruiting season. JMO.

Willie, I agree that he doesn't exactly fit us to a T, but keep in mind that Bo has used shorter defensive linemen before. I hope that we pursue him to the fullest, because I personally think he is simply the best football player in the state for the 2010 class.

 

I can never remember Bo recruiting a defensive lineman as short as Ron is. Kid is definitely not 6 feet.

 

Andrew Rodriguez has any player from the '10 class covered in the state. Kid is a monster who just needs a kick in the butt to play hard even against lesser competition. But like he showed at any camp he was at, he will be one of the best linemen there.

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I saw Coleman play this year as well and he is a very good runner. I could never see him playing DL at NU. He's an effective DL at the high school level but way too small to play in college. His future is as a runner. Good quickness for such a big kid.

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Trust me, if Ron Coleman wants to come to Nebraska, there will be a spot for him. He is an absolute freak, and will have quite an impressive scholarship list when it is all said and done. Keep in mind, he also plays d-line.

 

Where would he play? He isn't 6 feet from everything I have heard, so unless he is Sedrick Ellis reincarnated, the likelihood he plays DT is slim. We are short on schollies next year, so do we offer another guy who will play fullback in an offense that does not use it all that much now?

 

Coleman is a good player, no doubt, but not necessarily our type of player for next recruiting season. JMO.

Willie, I agree that he doesn't exactly fit us to a T, but keep in mind that Bo has used shorter defensive linemen before. I hope that we pursue him to the fullest, because I personally think he is simply the best football player in the state for the 2010 class.

 

I can never remember Bo recruiting a defensive lineman as short as Ron is. Kid is definitely not 6 feet.

 

Andrew Rodriguez has any player from the '10 class covered in the state. Kid is a monster who just needs a kick in the butt to play hard even against lesser competition. But like he showed at any camp he was at, he will be one of the best linemen there.

Glenn Dorsey may not be 6 foot. Jason Whitlock swore he is around 5-11 when he saw him after one of the last Chiefs games in the locker room.

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Glenn Dorsey may not be 6 foot. Jason Whitlock swore he is around 5-11 when he saw him after one of the last Chiefs games in the locker room.

He may still grow taller. He's only 16 or 17, right? He is also probably heavier than 240 now.

 

Anyway, this debate is moot. He'll likely camp this summer in Lincoln and if he looks like he can play DT, Nebraska will offer.

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Glenn Dorsey may not be 6 foot. Jason Whitlock swore he is around 5-11 when he saw him after one of the last Chiefs games in the locker room.

He may still grow taller. He's only 16 or 17, right? He is also probably heavier than 240 now.

 

Anyway, this debate is moot. He'll likely camp this summer in Lincoln and if he looks like he can play DT, Nebraska will offer.

 

No way. I would be shocked to my core if they offer him as a DL.

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Nebraska State Wrestling: Burger with everything

 

Study the picture of Ron Coleman Jr.

 

021909jlburger.jpg

Ron Coleman goes by the nickname "Burger," and he is what he eats. Before districts, he ate a hamburger and bacon topped with an egg.

 

You immediately notice eyes full of desire and intensity. Who knows the things they'll see on future playing fields and wrestling mats?

 

You notice the hamburger, or should we say heptaburger - seven thick slabs of beef stacked high. You don't want to be that hamburger. More on that later.

 

But notice the hands. The mitts caressing that burger are the same ones that manhandle some of the largest and most powerful high school wrestlers in Nebraska. You don't want those hands on you.

 

The large hands were the first thing his father noticed when Ron Jr. was born. Not long afterwards, Ron Coleman Sr. discovered they came powered with a vise-like grip.

 

Today, they are a product of both nature and nurture.

 

When baby Ron was just a few months old, big Ron discovered that if his son were lifted up to the bathroom shower curtain rod, he'd instinctively latch on to it. The first time Ron Sr. let him go, baby Ron hung there for 40 seconds before dropping into Dad's arms.

 

Not long after that, the youngster crawled into the kitchen and somehow wrapped those hands around the handle on the oven door. When the door came crashing down, baby and all, those big hands still clung to the handle.

 

"I said 'Hey, it looks like that work on his grip paid off,'" the elder Coleman remembers with a laugh. "My wife didn't think it was that funny."

 

Two-sport star

Ron Coleman Jr. is now a junior at Omaha North and more than halfway through a high school career that, when it's over, could be one of the greats in state history.

 

This morning, the kid known as "Burger" begins a quest for a third Class A title when the state wrestling tournament gets under way at Qwest Center Omaha.

 

After gold medals at 215 pounds the previous two years, the 6-foot, 240-pound Coleman is the top-ranked heavyweight in Class A and in the Top 5 of some national ratings at the weight class.

 

Adding to the intrigue is that Burger is no whopper when it comes to heavyweights. He weighs 45 pounds less then the heavyweight limit of 285.

 

As interesting as it is to watch him handle larger athletes on the wrestling mat, it's even more intriguing to ponder what his future holds. Although he's a dominating wrestler, it's likely that his sport of choice in college will be football. But what will the final product look like?

Nebraska sees him as a defensive tackle, which would mean adding weight while somehow keeping his quickness. Notre Dame has expressed interest in him at fullback and linebacker, which would mean perhaps battling natural growth and staying closer to his current size.

 

Speak to those who know him, and few doubt Coleman will eventually be whatever he sets his mind to. A made-to-order Burger, if you will.

 

"I've never worked with someone that has the size and speed and natural gifts," Vikings wrestling coach Anders Christensen said. "I don't even think I've ever been around one."

 

Nothing will surprise Coleman's father, a decorated former North High wrestler himself. The elder Coleman said only once has he really been taken aback by his son's accomplishments.

 

It came at an eighth-grade track meet. Ron Jr. had already won the shot put and discus - no big surprise, since at age 11, in his first try at the shot put, he'd broken a record held by former Omaha Central and Iowa football star Larry Station.

 

But then Burger was lining up to run a leg in the 400 relay.

 

"When he took the baton, I fell back in my seat," Ron Sr. said, remembering the burst of speed. "I had a moment."

What's in a name?

Ron Coleman Jr. devours hamburgers, among many other things. When he was young, Ron Sr. and others called him Hamburger Brown. It was shortened to "Burger" not long after and remains the name most call him.

 

And he still eats burgers - a special concoction a week ago, before the district meet, included hamburger patties and bacon topped with an egg, one of the perks of wrestling at heavyweight at only 240 pounds.

 

But as he has grown, the list of what he doesn't eat has become shorter than the list of what he does eat, which is just about anything.

 

The biggest growth spurt came around age 11, and it was more than just going from a size 10½ shoe to a 14.

 

That was the year Ron Jr. faced a 13-year-old 45 pounds heavier at the prestigious Tulsa Nationals in Oklahoma.

 

"It was the first time he ever said he was worried about a match," Ron Sr. said. "The kid he was wrestling had a mustache."

 

Burger won that match and the Tulsa tournament title. He hasn't lost many since. He capped a 31-4 freshman campaign with a state title, followed that up with a 30-1 sophomore season and another state title and heads into today's action with a 30-0 record.

 

He often takes down his opponents and lets them up to accumulate points, a practice normally reserved for dominant wrestlers in the lower weights.

 

"I respect the heck out of him," Omaha Burke wrestling coach Wes Boehm said. "The best thing about him is he's a gentleman. He can destroy you on the mat, be an absolute warrior, and then be a gentleman off of it."

 

Sudden impact

Watch tape of Burger on the football field and it takes only a few clips to realize he relishes contact.

 

His highlights typically show him running into an opponent with the force of a cinder block dropped from a five-story building.

 

North football coach Larry Martin smiles when he talks about the then-freshman with the big smile who turned heads in his first practices as a Viking - and his teammates included a quarterback and a wide receiver who would go on to sign with Big 12 schools.

 

The leverage, balance and momentum utilized in wrestling translate well to the football field. It's usually Coleman who is moving forward after contact.

 

"Certain kids are good athletes," Martin says, "and certain ones, when the pressure's on, they want it. Burger wants it. If you're going to beat him, you're going to have to give everything you have, and it still may not be enough."

 

Martin moved Coleman from defensive line to linebacker as a sophomore and back to the line last fall as a junior. Both moves came out of necessity because of injuries to others, and both were fine with Coleman, who was honored as a first-team All-Nebraska defensive lineman after the season.

 

He wasn't bad on offense, either. In his last four games, after shaking off his own injury problems, he ran for 463 yards and 13 touchdowns.

 

Before he reaches college, he knows he'll have to choose between managing weight to play linebacker or bulking up for the D-line.

 

Whatever the decision, Martin said, Coleman will excel.

 

"Burger has that ability that no matter where they take him at, he has a tremendous work ethic and desire," Martin said. College recruiters love measurables, Martin adds, but it's hard for them to measure heart, "and he's got a big one."

Higher power

There's more to Burger than wrestling pins and pulverizing gridiron hits. There's a spiritual side.

 

One day, Coleman's parents were consoling each other on the passing of Ron Sr.'s grandmother and Jr.'s great-grandmother. They were talking about her being gone.

 

Overhearing the discussion, 6-year-old Ron Jr. pointed to his heart and said, "Dad, she's not gone. She's right here."

 

"That's deep, especially for a 6-year-old," Ron Sr. said. "He's always had that special spiritual connection inside of him."

 

Coleman regularly talks about becoming a youth minister after college. He says his faith grew stronger in the early stages of this past football season. Battling nagging injuries, he said he put it in a higher power's hands to get him through the tough times.

 

"I've always been spiritually led," he said, "but after I kept getting hurt, I realized that I needed to get a full understanding."

 

He understands that his goals seem outrageous to some. For instance, as an eighth-grader, he told his dad he wanted to play varsity football as a freshman and win four state wrestling championships.

 

"I like to set goals that other people think are insane or not reachable," he said. "I see myself and everyone else as equals, but I set my work at a higher standard. To me, a goal has to have a plan. A goal without a plan is nothing but a wish."

 

Link: OWH

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Nebraska State Wrestling: Burger with everything

 

Study the picture of Ron Coleman Jr.

 

021909jlburger.jpg

Ron Coleman goes by the nickname "Burger," and he is what he eats. Before districts, he ate a hamburger and bacon topped with an egg.

 

You immediately notice eyes full of desire and intensity. Who knows the things they'll see on future playing fields and wrestling mats?

 

You notice the hamburger, or should we say heptaburger - seven thick slabs of beef stacked high. You don't want to be that hamburger. More on that later.

 

But notice the hands. The mitts caressing that burger are the same ones that manhandle some of the largest and most powerful high school wrestlers in Nebraska. You don't want those hands on you.

 

The large hands were the first thing his father noticed when Ron Jr. was born. Not long afterwards, Ron Coleman Sr. discovered they came powered with a vise-like grip.

 

Today, they are a product of both nature and nurture.

 

When baby Ron was just a few months old, big Ron discovered that if his son were lifted up to the bathroom shower curtain rod, he'd instinctively latch on to it. The first time Ron Sr. let him go, baby Ron hung there for 40 seconds before dropping into Dad's arms.

 

Not long after that, the youngster crawled into the kitchen and somehow wrapped those hands around the handle on the oven door. When the door came crashing down, baby and all, those big hands still clung to the handle.

 

"I said 'Hey, it looks like that work on his grip paid off,'" the elder Coleman remembers with a laugh. "My wife didn't think it was that funny."

 

Two-sport star

Ron Coleman Jr. is now a junior at Omaha North and more than halfway through a high school career that, when it's over, could be one of the greats in state history.

 

This morning, the kid known as "Burger" begins a quest for a third Class A title when the state wrestling tournament gets under way at Qwest Center Omaha.

 

After gold medals at 215 pounds the previous two years, the 6-foot, 240-pound Coleman is the top-ranked heavyweight in Class A and in the Top 5 of some national ratings at the weight class.

 

Adding to the intrigue is that Burger is no whopper when it comes to heavyweights. He weighs 45 pounds less then the heavyweight limit of 285.

 

As interesting as it is to watch him handle larger athletes on the wrestling mat, it's even more intriguing to ponder what his future holds. Although he's a dominating wrestler, it's likely that his sport of choice in college will be football. But what will the final product look like?

Nebraska sees him as a defensive tackle, which would mean adding weight while somehow keeping his quickness. Notre Dame has expressed interest in him at fullback and linebacker, which would mean perhaps battling natural growth and staying closer to his current size.

 

Speak to those who know him, and few doubt Coleman will eventually be whatever he sets his mind to. A made-to-order Burger, if you will.

 

"I've never worked with someone that has the size and speed and natural gifts," Vikings wrestling coach Anders Christensen said. "I don't even think I've ever been around one."

 

Nothing will surprise Coleman's father, a decorated former North High wrestler himself. The elder Coleman said only once has he really been taken aback by his son's accomplishments.

 

It came at an eighth-grade track meet. Ron Jr. had already won the shot put and discus - no big surprise, since at age 11, in his first try at the shot put, he'd broken a record held by former Omaha Central and Iowa football star Larry Station.

 

But then Burger was lining up to run a leg in the 400 relay.

 

"When he took the baton, I fell back in my seat," Ron Sr. said, remembering the burst of speed. "I had a moment."

What's in a name?

Ron Coleman Jr. devours hamburgers, among many other things. When he was young, Ron Sr. and others called him Hamburger Brown. It was shortened to "Burger" not long after and remains the name most call him.

 

And he still eats burgers - a special concoction a week ago, before the district meet, included hamburger patties and bacon topped with an egg, one of the perks of wrestling at heavyweight at only 240 pounds.

 

But as he has grown, the list of what he doesn't eat has become shorter than the list of what he does eat, which is just about anything.

 

The biggest growth spurt came around age 11, and it was more than just going from a size 10½ shoe to a 14.

 

That was the year Ron Jr. faced a 13-year-old 45 pounds heavier at the prestigious Tulsa Nationals in Oklahoma.

 

"It was the first time he ever said he was worried about a match," Ron Sr. said. "The kid he was wrestling had a mustache."

 

Burger won that match and the Tulsa tournament title. He hasn't lost many since. He capped a 31-4 freshman campaign with a state title, followed that up with a 30-1 sophomore season and another state title and heads into today's action with a 30-0 record.

 

He often takes down his opponents and lets them up to accumulate points, a practice normally reserved for dominant wrestlers in the lower weights.

 

"I respect the heck out of him," Omaha Burke wrestling coach Wes Boehm said. "The best thing about him is he's a gentleman. He can destroy you on the mat, be an absolute warrior, and then be a gentleman off of it."

 

Sudden impact

Watch tape of Burger on the football field and it takes only a few clips to realize he relishes contact.

 

His highlights typically show him running into an opponent with the force of a cinder block dropped from a five-story building.

 

North football coach Larry Martin smiles when he talks about the then-freshman with the big smile who turned heads in his first practices as a Viking - and his teammates included a quarterback and a wide receiver who would go on to sign with Big 12 schools.

 

The leverage, balance and momentum utilized in wrestling translate well to the football field. It's usually Coleman who is moving forward after contact.

 

"Certain kids are good athletes," Martin says, "and certain ones, when the pressure's on, they want it. Burger wants it. If you're going to beat him, you're going to have to give everything you have, and it still may not be enough."

 

Martin moved Coleman from defensive line to linebacker as a sophomore and back to the line last fall as a junior. Both moves came out of necessity because of injuries to others, and both were fine with Coleman, who was honored as a first-team All-Nebraska defensive lineman after the season.

 

He wasn't bad on offense, either. In his last four games, after shaking off his own injury problems, he ran for 463 yards and 13 touchdowns.

 

Before he reaches college, he knows he'll have to choose between managing weight to play linebacker or bulking up for the D-line.

 

Whatever the decision, Martin said, Coleman will excel.

 

"Burger has that ability that no matter where they take him at, he has a tremendous work ethic and desire," Martin said. College recruiters love measurables, Martin adds, but it's hard for them to measure heart, "and he's got a big one."

Higher power

There's more to Burger than wrestling pins and pulverizing gridiron hits. There's a spiritual side.

 

One day, Coleman's parents were consoling each other on the passing of Ron Sr.'s grandmother and Jr.'s great-grandmother. They were talking about her being gone.

 

Overhearing the discussion, 6-year-old Ron Jr. pointed to his heart and said, "Dad, she's not gone. She's right here."

 

"That's deep, especially for a 6-year-old," Ron Sr. said. "He's always had that special spiritual connection inside of him."

 

Coleman regularly talks about becoming a youth minister after college. He says his faith grew stronger in the early stages of this past football season. Battling nagging injuries, he said he put it in a higher power's hands to get him through the tough times.

 

"I've always been spiritually led," he said, "but after I kept getting hurt, I realized that I needed to get a full understanding."

 

He understands that his goals seem outrageous to some. For instance, as an eighth-grader, he told his dad he wanted to play varsity football as a freshman and win four state wrestling championships.

 

"I like to set goals that other people think are insane or not reachable," he said. "I see myself and everyone else as equals, but I set my work at a higher standard. To me, a goal has to have a plan. A goal without a plan is nothing but a wish."

 

Link: OWH

 

 

I will believe it when I see him line up at DT.

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He dominated his first 2 opponents yesterday. Pinned them in 1:47 and 1:09. I don't care what position he plays, as long as he comes to Nebraska. He is a pure athlete.

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He dominated his first 2 opponents yesterday. Pinned them in 1:47 and 1:09. I don't care what position he plays, as long as he comes to Nebraska. He is a pure athlete.

 

 

:yeah

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Anyone know what coaches are waiting on for the offer? Sure seems like we would be absolutely crazy to miss out on this guy. How could you not want this guy...DT LB FB...coaches can figure that out, but anyone with that kind of versatility will be a great addition.

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Anyone know what coaches are waiting on for the offer? Sure seems like we would be absolutely crazy to miss out on this guy. How could you not want this guy...DT LB FB...coaches can figure that out, but anyone with that kind of versatility will be a great addition.

Probably want to get him into camp and see how all of that new weight looks on him. He might have been running with the LBs last year in camp. :dunno

 

Of course if he also grows into those feet in the mean time, all the better. OTOH the staff seems to really like big guys in the back field.

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Anyone know what coaches are waiting on for the offer? Sure seems like we would be absolutely crazy to miss out on this guy. How could you not want this guy...DT LB FB...coaches can figure that out, but anyone with that kind of versatility will be a great addition.

Probably want to get him into camp and see how all of that new weight looks on him. He might have been running with the LBs last year in camp. :dunno

 

Of course if he also grows into those feet in the mean time, all the better. OTOH the staff seems to really like big guys in the back field.

 

I watched the playoff game with Papio South last fall and he made a TD run where he weaved through traffic and read the running lanes like a speed and juke back. I knew he was big for a back but I was shocked when I found out how much he weighed. I think his athletic ability is top notch. AND big backs don't usually impress me that much. I'm much more of a scatback guy. Anyone else see that game and remember the run I'm talking about?

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We offered Sutton last year and he is the same size, and Randle is only an inch taller.

 

I think we'll offer and probably figure on him as a DT, maybe a LB or FB.

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Trust me, if Ron Coleman wants to come to Nebraska, there will be a spot for him. He is an absolute freak, and will have quite an impressive scholarship list when it is all said and done. Keep in mind, he also plays d-line.

 

Where would he play? He isn't 6 feet from everything I have heard, so unless he is Sedrick Ellis reincarnated, the likelihood he plays DT is slim. We are short on schollies next year, so do we offer another guy who will play fullback in an offense that does not use it all that much now?

 

Coleman is a good player, no doubt, but not necessarily our type of player for next recruiting season. JMO.

Willie, I agree that he doesn't exactly fit us to a T, but keep in mind that Bo has used shorter defensive linemen before. I hope that we pursue him to the fullest, because I personally think he is simply the best football player in the state for the 2010 class.

 

I can never remember Bo recruiting a defensive lineman as short as Ron is. Kid is definitely not 6 feet.

 

Andrew Rodriguez has any player from the '10 class covered in the state. Kid is a monster who just needs a kick in the butt to play hard even against lesser competition. But like he showed at any camp he was at, he will be one of the best linemen there.

 

 

Just because he is rated best in the state doesnt mean NU should offer (even though Rodriguez clearly is), and to add to the football comment- it would be the second year in a row to offer a fullback and I see that unlikely

 

Personally I think he is too slow for a fullback or linebacker and too small for a dt, but he still might grow and NU's weight staff is great so we will have to see.

 

If I were NU Coleman would be more of a backup plan, Wrestlers usually do good on the lines but I just dont personally see him as a D-1 player (great NE high school, but I dont know college) the times I have seen him

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Trust me, if Ron Coleman wants to come to Nebraska, there will be a spot for him. He is an absolute freak, and will have quite an impressive scholarship list when it is all said and done. Keep in mind, he also plays d-line.

 

Where would he play? He isn't 6 feet from everything I have heard, so unless he is Sedrick Ellis reincarnated, the likelihood he plays DT is slim. We are short on schollies next year, so do we offer another guy who will play fullback in an offense that does not use it all that much now?

 

Coleman is a good player, no doubt, but not necessarily our type of player for next recruiting season. JMO.

Willie, I agree that he doesn't exactly fit us to a T, but keep in mind that Bo has used shorter defensive linemen before. I hope that we pursue him to the fullest, because I personally think he is simply the best football player in the state for the 2010 class.

 

I can never remember Bo recruiting a defensive lineman as short as Ron is. Kid is definitely not 6 feet.

 

Andrew Rodriguez has any player from the '10 class covered in the state. Kid is a monster who just needs a kick in the butt to play hard even against lesser competition. But like he showed at any camp he was at, he will be one of the best linemen there.

 

 

Just because he is rated best in the state doesnt mean NU should offer (even though Rodriguez clearly is), and to add to the football comment- it would be the second year in a row to offer a fullback and I see that unlikely

 

Personally I think he is too slow for a fullback or linebacker and too small for a dt, but he still might grow and NU's weight staff is great so we will have to see.

 

If I were NU Coleman would be more of a backup plan, Wrestlers usually do good on the lines but I just dont personally see him as a D-1 player (great NE high school, but I dont know college) the times I have seen him

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021909jlburger.jpg

 

this image is BEYOND awesome!

 

and in-so-much as 'we HAVE a fullback,' i like the idea of multiple running backs. but i'm just a fan so what do i know?

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Could he end up at DE? He is a little bit short but hes short for DT too. From everything that has been written hes strong enough to play line and quick enough to play LB so why not let him add about 20 lbs and put him at DE.

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Could he end up at DE? He is a little bit short but hes short for DT too. From everything that has been written hes strong enough to play line and quick enough to play LB so why not let him add about 20 lbs and put him at DE.

 

I think they prefer the height at DE for the ability of knocking down passes, ala Potter and that with height comes long arms that help to get around 6'7" tackles

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This guy is a DT if he comes here. He is 6'0, a height Bo seems to like for DTs and he has the quickness being a RB. So bring him in, beef him up, teach the techs and footwork, he could be a very good DT with leverage you can't teach.

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This guy is a DT if he comes here. He is 6'0, a height Bo seems to like for DTs and he has the quickness being a RB. So bring him in, beef him up, teach the techs and footwork, he could be a very good DT with leverage you can't teach.

 

 

I'd be shocked if he plays DT here.

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This guy is a DT if he comes here. He is 6'0, a height Bo seems to like for DTs and he has the quickness being a RB. So bring him in, beef him up, teach the techs and footwork, he could be a very good DT with leverage you can't teach.

He won't be batting down any passes, but at that height when he's not going around them with his quickness, he should be able to get under the OLs pads and forklift them back into the pocket.

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big discrepency in his size. somewhere between 210-260 makes a lot of difference and being only 6' or a tad less will limit his ability to play as a linemen. too slow to play LB, too short to play DE or interior linemen, a blocking FB, is about all i can project him as.....who knows...

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Well he's a heavyweight wrestler so he probably isn't 210 lbs. I would say he's closer to 260 but that is still a lot of weight to put on to a 6 foot frame to be able to play DT in the big 12, depending on his bone structure.

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Well he's a heavyweight wrestler so he probably isn't 210 lbs. I would say he's closer to 260 but that is still a lot of weight to put on to a 6 foot frame to be able to play DT in the big 12, depending on his bone structure.

Got bigger from Soph to Junior year? :dunno

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big discrepency in his size. somewhere between 210-260 makes a lot of difference and being only 6' or a tad less will limit his ability to play as a linemen. too slow to play LB, too short to play DE or interior linemen, a blocking FB, is about all i can project him as.....who knows...

 

Glenn Dorsey is 6-foot or shorter, he did all right. He does need to bulk up, but the height isn't as big of an issue in the middle of the line, it could actually help him with leverage.

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Well he's a heavyweight wrestler so he probably isn't 210 lbs. I would say he's closer to 260 but that is still a lot of weight to put on to a 6 foot frame to be able to play DT in the big 12, depending on his bone structure.

Well since Heavyweight starts at 215 and goes up to 285, he could be anywhere in between. From my experience, I don't remember a lot of Heavyweights being up towards 265. Most were 215-245 or so, but things may have changed a bit in HS since.

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On the nfl.com combine it lists Dorsey at 6'1 297 lbs. From what I've read on here Coleman isn't even 6' so I'm just saying that it will be hard for him to put on the necessary weight to be able to consistently hold his own at DT in the big 12. I think we all thought that Sellers would get an offer last year but he must not have fit what the coaches wanted to do, so I guess we'll just have to wait see. With that said I think the staff has proven they don't really care about height as long as you can play.

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I remeber seeing Will Shields on one of these post season challange shows where they do position drills to compete as best whatever. Anyway, the one area he had trouble with, and said himself that it was common, was blocking the shorter sleds (translate tacklers). Problem is, when your 6-4,6-5,6-6, its hard to get your pad level down to 5-11 chest level.

I'm not saying I prefer little DT s, just that I think it's interesting how sometimes a player or coach can sometimes take advantage of a preceived shortcoming.

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For right now anyway he can't go anywhere on schollie

 

 

IMO he'd at-least have nonBCS offers but those teams are waiting to see what the nearby BCS teams are gonna do.

 

 

No way in hell do I see this kid walking-on, even on the off chance he didn't get a good football offer you know damn well the wrestling offers will come in.

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if he can play like Dorsey, sure, bring him on...not many like him, but UNDER 6' is a potential problem for a linemen.

I definately agree with you about O-Lineman and DE, but I am not so sure that is a requisite at DT anymore. Looking at the 2009 NFL draft, there were several shorter DT's taken. Here are the first 10 DT's taken:

 

B.J. Raji - Selected 9th by Greenbay is 6' 1.5" tall

Peria Jerry - Selected 24th by Atlanta is 6' 1.75" tall

Evander Hood - Selected 32nd by Pittsburg is 6' 2.875" tall

Ron Brace - Selected 40th by New England is 6' 3" tall

Fili Moala - Selected 56th by Indianapolis is 6' 4" tall

Sen'Derrick Marks - Selected 62nd by Tennessee is 6' 1.75" tall

Alex Magee - Selected 67th by Kansas City is 6' 2.625" tall

Jarron Gilbert - Selected 68th by Chicago is 6' 5.25" tall

Terrance Knighton - Selected 72nd by Jacksonville is 6' 3" tall

Roy Miller - Selected 81st by Tampa Bay is 6' 1.25" tall

 

Note only 2 of those players is over 6' 3" tall and 6 of the 10 are under 6' 3" tall. Also looking at the following excerpt from a story written about Cole Pensick last year, and you get the feeling that Bo and Carl want players that are a bit shorter so they can get leverage on the O-Linemen. How short is too short for a DT, I don't know but I wouldn't think 6' is out of the question looking at the size of players being taken in the draft and from what Bo and Carl already have said and who they have recruited.

 

LJS - Old-school Pensick learns from Dad

"When the coaching staff changed after the 2007 season, it was a relief because it took the pressure off having to make that decision," Dan Pensick said. "The old coaching staff (led by Bill Callahan) was showing interest in Cole, but they had their height and weight demands of linemen. And Cole is not quite in the height pattern of most of those guys' wishes. So we thought at that stage we had better look elsewhere."

 

What was the previous staff looking for height-wise?

 

"Six-foot-4 or 6-5, in that range," Dan Pensick said.

 

Notable exceptions were 2006 starters Ola Dagunduro and Barry Cryer, both 6-2. The 2008 starters were 6-4 Ndamukong Suh and 6-3 Ty Steinkuhler, with Jared Crick (6-6) and Terrence Moore (6-3) serving as top backups.

 

"Cole being 6-1 or 6-2, we were concerned about that," Dan Pensick said. "The previous staff didn't make any qualms about it. Every time they came up to Cole, it was, 'Is he going to get taller?' Then the staff changed, and things happened fast."

 

Bo Pelini took over as Nebraska head coach on Dec. 2, 2007. On Jan. 16, 2008, Pelini met with Cole and Dan and offered Cole a scholarship. Cole accepted on the spot, becoming the first player to verbally commit to the Huskers' 2009 recruiting class.

 

It was around that time when Cole stood next to former Louisiana State All-America defensive tackle Glenn Dorsey at the Outland Trophy banquet in Omaha.

 

"His body's bigger than mine, but he looked to be the same height as me," Cole said.

 

Dorsey is listed at 6-1, 297 on the Kansas City Chiefs' Web site.

 

"Bo told us, 'We're designing our defense in the middle to have guys who can plug it up and get underneath people's shoulder pads,'" Dan Pensick said.

 

Said Cole: "Coach Pelini and his staff never said anything to me about height. They said, 'If you can play, you can play.'"

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Looking at the 2009 NFL draft, there were several shorter DT's taken. Here are the first 10 DT's taken:

 

B.J. Raji - Selected 9th by Greenbay is 6' 1.5" tall

Peria Jerry - Selected 24th by Atlanta is 6' 1.75" tall

Evander Hood - Selected 32nd by Pittsburg is 6' 2.875" tall

Ron Brace - Selected 40th by New England is 6' 3" tall

Fili Moala - Selected 56th by Indianapolis is 6' 4" tall

Sen'Derrick Marks - Selected 62nd by Tennessee is 6' 1.75" tall

Alex Magee - Selected 67th by Kansas City is 6' 2.625" tall

Jarron Gilbert - Selected 68th by Chicago is 6' 5.25" tall

Terrance Knighton - Selected 72nd by Jacksonville is 6' 3" tall

Roy Miller - Selected 81st by Tampa Bay is 6' 1.25" tall

Nice research. Of course as a ~16-18 year old, he is still growing. As far as weight, a shorter DT can play with less weight as leverage comes into play.

 

Regardless of what we all think, when he camps at Nebraska, we will find out what we need to know. If he does not get offered after camp, assume he doesn't quite measure up to Nebraska's needs.

 

I imagine UNO (among many other smaller programs) would love to have him so I think he won't be interested in walking on. My guess is this being a small class definitely hurts his chances; where he might have found a spot to fill out a 25-30 guy class.

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