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Mavric

SIGNED - RB Jaylin Bradley

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Player: Jaylin Bradley
Hometown: Bellevue, Nebraska
School: Bellevue West
Position: Running Back
Height: 6-0
Weight: 187
40 time:
Offers: Nebraska
Visits: 1/21/17

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247 Composite: #1524 Overall; #99 RB; .8208; :star :star :star

Rivals: :star :star :star
247: #80 RB; :star :star :star
Scout: :star :star :star
ESPN: #97 RB; :star :star :star

Hudl

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Okay, so this has been bothering me. Let's discuss.

 

Everyone on this board has been discussing his academics and how they are not on point to attend Nebraska, or anything D1 school for that matter... Now, onto the part that bothers me.

 

Over on Scout.com--

 

There is a poster named JackD, who is actually a mod, who says he has an insider (classmate of Bradley's), who says it's not Bradleys fault, it's his ELEMENTARY TEACHERS WHO DROPPED THE BALL.

 

Now, this bothers me.

 

DISCUSS.

Edited by Mavric
MattyIce started this thread. I moved a post ahead of it to create the profile.

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How did his elementary teachers drop the ball?

 

Glad you are on my side of this debate. Curious if anyone on here will get on the other side of it.

 

GREAT QUESTION BY THE WAY.

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EXCERPT 1:

 

He is really good, and a great kid by all accounts. Sounds like his elementary school teachers failed him and when he got to high school he was not equipped with the basic tools to stay above water. If he were academically eligible throughout the whole process he would have double digit Power 5 offers and rated higher than Ozigbo or Bryant in my estimation.

 

EXCERPT 2:

 

Maybe I do not want to give the details but am comfortable based on the information I have from one of his good friends in saying it was not his fault.

But the details should not be placed on a message board, premium or otherwise. If you want to be a jerk you were successful

EXCERPT 3:

My wife is a first grade teacher at a Title 1 school in the metro, not only do I "but that story" I can guarantees there are hundreds like him every year in OPS, BPS, D66, Ralston, etc. she is not my 'source' on this but I know for a fact this is not unusual. Glad you are lucky enough to have never experienced the education system that many grow up in.

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It was stated during the game last night that Bradley admits he slacked off during his Freshman and Sophomore years and it is now catching up to him.

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Maybe that guy on Scout is right but I find it hard to believe that an elementary teacher would just fail a student for no reason. I'm with Warrior, he slacked off early in his HS career and that came back to haunt him.

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Reading between the lines (second-to-thirdhand here), but I think what he's saying is that his elementary school teachers let him skate by without holding him accountable. That type of behavior snowballs until it smacks the student in the face later on in life (be it in HS or even college). If he didn't have any sort of work ethic, that would lend itself to him struggling in his first two years of HS, no matter how smart he is.

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Exactly. Major slap in the face to any educator. RIDICULOUS CLAIM. If you want to go look, I did call the guy out, and got lambasted by his buddies until one poster agreed with me.

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Some kids are smarter than others. Some kids are more athletic than others. BUT to get average grades in high school only requires you to try. These kids aren't taking quantum mechanics

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As I'm unfamiliar with his situation, what are the chances he gets the academic stuff cleared up? Potential preferred walk-on candidate? Or will he go JUCO?

All the talk has been that if he gets his grades up, and gets a qualifying ACT score, he'll get a scholly. I wouldn't be surprised to see him end up at a Juco if Nebraska wants to stash him for a couple years.

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Some kids are smarter than others. Some kids are more athletic than others. BUT to get average grades in high school only requires you to try. These kids aren't taking quantum mechanics

 

Yeah, but what if your Elementary Teachers let you down? ;)

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As I'm unfamiliar with his situation, what are the chances he gets the academic stuff cleared up? Potential preferred walk-on candidate? Or will he go JUCO?

All the talk has been that if he gets his grades up, and gets a qualifying ACT score, he'll get a scholly. I wouldn't be surprised to see him end up at a Juco if Nebraska wants to stash him for a couple years.

 

PS, those ideas always sound great, but can anyone name the last time it actually worked out that way? (Meaning, we stashed him at a JUCO and then they eventually ended up at Nebraska)

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As I'm unfamiliar with his situation, what are the chances he gets the academic stuff cleared up? Potential preferred walk-on candidate? Or will he go JUCO?

All the talk has been that if he gets his grades up, and gets a qualifying ACT score, he'll get a scholly. I wouldn't be surprised to see him end up at a Juco if Nebraska wants to stash him for a couple years.

 

PS, those ideas always sound great, but can anyone name the last time it actually worked out that way? (Meaning, we stashed him at a JUCO and then they eventually ended up at Nebraska)

 

Who was the kid that Pelini put at Iowa Western with the intent of bringing him back? It happened during the transition, and Riley passed on him.

 

In a business sense, it at least lets the program get a look at a kid against competition that is a higher level than Class A football in Nebraska.

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As I'm unfamiliar with his situation, what are the chances he gets the academic stuff cleared up? Potential preferred walk-on candidate? Or will he go JUCO?

All the talk has been that if he gets his grades up, and gets a qualifying ACT score, he'll get a scholly. I wouldn't be surprised to see him end up at a Juco if Nebraska wants to stash him for a couple years.

 

PS, those ideas always sound great, but can anyone name the last time it actually worked out that way? (Meaning, we stashed him at a JUCO and then they eventually ended up at Nebraska)

 

Who was the kid that Pelini put at Iowa Western with the intent of bringing him back? It happened during the transition, and Riley passed on him.

 

In a business sense, it at least lets the program get a look at a kid against competition that is a higher level than Class A football in Nebraska.

 

 

Dude, I agree with you. It's a great idea. I'm just saying it never seems to pan out.

(It was a RB that was recently placed there, name escapes me though)

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Reading between the lines (second-to-thirdhand here), but I think what he's saying is that his elementary school teachers let him skate by without holding him accountable. That type of behavior snowballs until it smacks the student in the face later on in life (be it in HS or even college). If he didn't have any sort of work ethic, that would lend itself to him struggling in his first two years of HS, no matter how smart he is.

Which screams at me...."PARENTS".

 

This kid may very well be smart enough to get decent to good grades in HS and get well above a qualifying ACT. However, if everything discussed here is correct, I would put the first and foremost blame on the parents. If the grade school teacher let him "slip by" without learning anything to prepare him...the parents should have been better involved in making sure he IS learning something and preparing him.

 

Work ethic??? Where do you think that is taught? Hint....it's not from the teachers.

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As I'm unfamiliar with his situation, what are the chances he gets the academic stuff cleared up? Potential preferred walk-on candidate? Or will he go JUCO?

His coach said last night something along the lines of: "There is a plan in place to get Jaylin to Lincoln, it's up to him to follow it."

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As I'm unfamiliar with his situation, what are the chances he gets the academic stuff cleared up? Potential preferred walk-on candidate? Or will he go JUCO?

All the talk has been that if he gets his grades up, and gets a qualifying ACT score, he'll get a scholly. I wouldn't be surprised to see him end up at a Juco if Nebraska wants to stash him for a couple years.

 

PS, those ideas always sound great, but can anyone name the last time it actually worked out that way? (Meaning, we stashed him at a JUCO and then they eventually ended up at Nebraska)

 

Who was the kid that Pelini put at Iowa Western with the intent of bringing him back? It happened during the transition, and Riley passed on him.

 

In a business sense, it at least lets the program get a look at a kid against competition that is a higher level than Class A football in Nebraska.

 

 

Dude, I agree with you. It's a great idea. I'm just saying it never seems to pan out.

(It was a RB that was recently placed there, name escapes me though)

 

Oh yea, I'm sorry if the tone conveyed was combative; I'm in agreement with you. I was more "thinking out loud" than anything.

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Reading between the lines (second-to-thirdhand here), but I think what he's saying is that his elementary school teachers let him skate by without holding him accountable. That type of behavior snowballs until it smacks the student in the face later on in life (be it in HS or even college). If he didn't have any sort of work ethic, that would lend itself to him struggling in his first two years of HS, no matter how smart he is.

Which screams at me...."PARENTS".

 

This kid may very well be smart enough to get decent to good grades in HS and get well above a qualifying ACT. However, if everything discussed here is correct, I would put the first and foremost blame on the parents. If the grade school teacher let him "slip by" without learning anything to prepare him...the parents should have been better involved in making sure he IS learning something and preparing him.

 

Work ethic??? Where do you think that is taught? Hint....it's not from the teachers.

 

As a teacher, all I can say is:

 

giphy.gif

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I am friends with Bellevue West grads a couple years older than Jaylin who were friends with him in high school. Let's just say I'm not sure what his grades have been junior/senior year, but he was averaging below D's the first two years. Not easy to overcome in terms of averages.

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Most courses In high school you can just do the homework and not study and STILL pass. Just don't be lazy.

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I haven't read the entire thread, but I used to date a 5th grade teacher working for a metro area school. She would tell me on average, she'd have 4-5 kids a year in her class of around 20 that read at a 1st or 2nd grade level. And because the process was so difficult to actually hold the kid back to work on his education, the kids would be moved up the next grade. So, I can see his point where his elementary school teachers failed him. However, it sounds like it's more a systematic issue where teachers feel it's too difficult to hold kids back to repeat a grade, and instead just push the kid to the next grade level.

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Also, my nephew goes to Bell West, knows Jaylin personally and says there's very little chance he'll make it to a D1 school

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I haven't read the entire thread, but I used to date a 5th grade teacher working for a metro area school. She would tell me on average, she'd have 4-5 kids a year in her class of around 20 that read at a 1st or 2nd grade level. And because the process was so difficult to actually hold the kid back to work on his education, the kids would be moved up the next grade. So, I can see his point where his elementary school teachers failed him. However, it sounds like it's more a systematic issue where teachers feel it's too difficult to hold kids back to repeat a grade, and instead just push the kid to the next grade level.

 

To reply to that, I have taught at an extremely low socio-economic school.

 

It's not hard for the teacher to say this kid should stay back, or this could should move up. It's hard to get the parent to agree. That's the hard part. The Teacher only "moves the kid up" because that's what the parent wants to do. I've never heard of a school district that can force a parent to make their kid stay back a grade. They can only make strong recommendations...

 

So once again, that's on the parent, if that's truly what the issue is. NOT THE ELEMENTARY TEACHER FOR CRYING OUT LOUD.

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To reply to that, I have taught at an extremely low socio-economic school.

 

It's not hard for the teacher to say this kid should stay back, or this could should move up. It's hard to get the parent to agree. That's the hard part. The Teacher only "moves the kid up" because that's what the parent wants to do. I've never heard of a school district that can force a parent to make their kid stay back a grade. They can only make strong recommendations...

 

So once again, that's on the parent, if that's truly what the issue is. NOT THE ELEMENTARY TEACHER FOR CRYING OUT LOUD.

Dear God, Matty is leading our children...

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I haven't read the entire thread, but I used to date a 5th grade teacher working for a metro area school. She would tell me on average, she'd have 4-5 kids a year in her class of around 20 that read at a 1st or 2nd grade level. And because the process was so difficult to actually hold the kid back to work on his education, the kids would be moved up the next grade. So, I can see his point where his elementary school teachers failed him. However, it sounds like it's more a systematic issue where teachers feel it's too difficult to hold kids back to repeat a grade, and instead just push the kid to the next grade level.

To reply to that, I have taught at an extremely low socio-economic school.

 

It's not hard for the teacher to say this kid should stay back, or this could should move up. It's hard to get the parent to agree. That's the hard part. The Teacher only "moves the kid up" because that's what the parent wants to do. I've never heard of a school district that can force a parent to make their kid stay back a grade. They can only make strong recommendations...

 

So once again, that's on the parent, if that's truly what the issue is. NOT THE ELEMENTARY TEACHER FOR CRYING OUT LOUD.

Why would the parent have ultimate say in this?

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As I'm unfamiliar with his situation, what are the chances he gets the academic stuff cleared up? Potential preferred walk-on candidate? Or will he go JUCO?

All the talk has been that if he gets his grades up, and gets a qualifying ACT score, he'll get a scholly. I wouldn't be surprised to see him end up at a Juco if Nebraska wants to stash him for a couple years.

 

PS, those ideas always sound great, but can anyone name the last time it actually worked out that way? (Meaning, we stashed him at a JUCO and then they eventually ended up at Nebraska)

 

Who was the kid that Pelini put at Iowa Western with the intent of bringing him back? It happened during the transition, and Riley passed on him.

 

In a business sense, it at least lets the program get a look at a kid against competition that is a higher level than Class A football in Nebraska.

 

That would be Vondrae Tostenson.

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We can't have a generally sour (and fairly so) view of the American education system and not acknowledge that students show up in HS far less equipped than they should be as a result of it, IMO.

 

I'd amend it only so far as to say some (well, a lot) of this is nobody's fault. Be born into certain socioeconomic conditions and locations and you're more than likely fine.

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To reply to that, I have taught at an extremely low socio-economic school.

 

It's not hard for the teacher to say this kid should stay back, or this could should move up. It's hard to get the parent to agree. That's the hard part. The Teacher only "moves the kid up" because that's what the parent wants to do. I've never heard of a school district that can force a parent to make their kid stay back a grade. They can only make strong recommendations...

 

So once again, that's on the parent, if that's truly what the issue is. NOT THE ELEMENTARY TEACHER FOR CRYING OUT LOUD.

Dear God, Matty is leading our children...

 

 

Well thank you for the vote of confidence, Mr. Eichorst.

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As I'm unfamiliar with his situation, what are the chances he gets the academic stuff cleared up? Potential preferred walk-on candidate? Or will he go JUCO?

All the talk has been that if he gets his grades up, and gets a qualifying ACT score, he'll get a scholly. I wouldn't be surprised to see him end up at a Juco if Nebraska wants to stash him for a couple years.

 

PS, those ideas always sound great, but can anyone name the last time it actually worked out that way? (Meaning, we stashed him at a JUCO and then they eventually ended up at Nebraska)

 

Who was the kid that Pelini put at Iowa Western with the intent of bringing him back? It happened during the transition, and Riley passed on him.

 

In a business sense, it at least lets the program get a look at a kid against competition that is a higher level than Class A football in Nebraska.

 

That would be Vondrae Tostenson.

 

It was RB Larenzo Stewart from Klein, Texas. Kid was a jitterbug and great return man.

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I haven't read the entire thread, but I used to date a 5th grade teacher working for a metro area school. She would tell me on average, she'd have 4-5 kids a year in her class of around 20 that read at a 1st or 2nd grade level. And because the process was so difficult to actually hold the kid back to work on his education, the kids would be moved up the next grade. So, I can see his point where his elementary school teachers failed him. However, it sounds like it's more a systematic issue where teachers feel it's too difficult to hold kids back to repeat a grade, and instead just push the kid to the next grade level.

To reply to that, I have taught at an extremely low socio-economic school.

 

It's not hard for the teacher to say this kid should stay back, or this could should move up. It's hard to get the parent to agree. That's the hard part. The Teacher only "moves the kid up" because that's what the parent wants to do. I've never heard of a school district that can force a parent to make their kid stay back a grade. They can only make strong recommendations...

 

So once again, that's on the parent, if that's truly what the issue is. NOT THE ELEMENTARY TEACHER FOR CRYING OUT LOUD.

Why would the parent have ultimate say in this?

 

 

That's a great question. I hope someone on here has a different view point or experience of the situation. I've worked at 3 schools, all 3 have been the same. You can strongly suggest a student stay back, but need parent's okay on it. It's that way until HS. (I'm not saying it's like that at every school, but I think it might be state law? or something?) Someone with different information feel free to hop in.

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I haven't read the entire thread, but I used to date a 5th grade teacher working for a metro area school. She would tell me on average, she'd have 4-5 kids a year in her class of around 20 that read at a 1st or 2nd grade level. And because the process was so difficult to actually hold the kid back to work on his education, the kids would be moved up the next grade. So, I can see his point where his elementary school teachers failed him. However, it sounds like it's more a systematic issue where teachers feel it's too difficult to hold kids back to repeat a grade, and instead just push the kid to the next grade level.

Yup, I hear ya.

 

My parents took in a brother and sister when they were in 7th and 8th grade. My brother, as I refer to them as brother and sister, graduated from Washington last summer, while my sister was passed along the system and somehow graduated high school, albeit testing in math and reading at no higher than a 5th grade level. I see the problems as a mixture of absent/abusive parents, the school admin and teachers passing her along, and a kid's effort and ability. It's a no win situation and really sucks to see and ultimately it hurts the kid more than anybody else.

 

From my account, and most situations, I place more onus on the parents for failing their kid, not holding them accountable and pushing their kids to at least do the minimum to learn. I think the faculty has only so much ability to hold kids accountable, but it's their job to teach the subject matter and identify the kids who struggle. It's the administrators/teachers to inform the parents, and then for all of them to figure out a solution going forward. I understand it's not every case, but many cases I hear about from elementary educators, are that parents don't show up to conferences, respond to calls, and just use school as a daycare.

 

My have strayed off a little bit, but just my 2¢ from what I've seen first hand.

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I haven't read the entire thread, but I used to date a 5th grade teacher working for a metro area school. She would tell me on average, she'd have 4-5 kids a year in her class of around 20 that read at a 1st or 2nd grade level. And because the process was so difficult to actually hold the kid back to work on his education, the kids would be moved up the next grade. So, I can see his point where his elementary school teachers failed him. However, it sounds like it's more a systematic issue where teachers feel it's too difficult to hold kids back to repeat a grade, and instead just push the kid to the next grade level.

To reply to that, I have taught at an extremely low socio-economic school.

 

It's not hard for the teacher to say this kid should stay back, or this could should move up. It's hard to get the parent to agree. That's the hard part. The Teacher only "moves the kid up" because that's what the parent wants to do. I've never heard of a school district that can force a parent to make their kid stay back a grade. They can only make strong recommendations...

 

So once again, that's on the parent, if that's truly what the issue is. NOT THE ELEMENTARY TEACHER FOR CRYING OUT LOUD.

Why would the parent have ultimate say in this?

 

 

That's a great question. I hope someone on here has a different view point or experience of the situation. I've worked at 3 schools, all 3 have been the same. You can strongly suggest a student stay back, but need parent's okay on it. It's that way until HS. (I'm not saying it's like that at every school, but I think it might be state law? or something?) Someone with different information feel free to hop in.

 

By doing this, you're (mostly parents) not only failing the student but allowing the parents to not take responsibility to have the kid prepared to be in school and actually try.

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Can he not get a tutor to help him with his classes? It is not that hard for him/his parent or heck his coach to find him a tutor to help him understand his homework, which in turn will help him on tests. Kid is a great talent in the state, and its a shame all of our really good athletes from the state are just not able to qualify. This is most of them not all of them.

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FWIW, (probably the wrong spot for this) I took a class with Terrell Newby. Teacher made everyone stand up in class and read. He can't read any better than my 10-year-old brother could.

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Has anyone on here watched last chance u? They pretty much force feed the kids to go to class and help them with their work and they still struggle. A lot of it is the attitude towards the classes you are taking.

 

If you don't put in the effort early on it's really hard to qualify when those D's and F's are dragging your average down

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Most of my family are teachers. My father just retired as a HS teacher and football coach. He always told his players they are students first. He would also tell players (usually ones crying about a bad grade) he never gave a student a grade. They earned whatever grade they got. Yes some kids aren't as smart as others but I've seen kids who want to be eligible put in a lot of effort to keep up their grades. As far as the system failing kids thats BS. I've seen parents come in and defend their kids to the end that their kid is an angel and the teachers are just out to get them. Not much you can say when the parents are just as ignorant as the kid. If his coaches were on top of things it should have never got to this point. If they tried then it's on this kid and it's his own fault

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Most of my family are teachers. My father just retired as a HS teacher and football coach. He always told his players they are students first. He would also tell players (usually ones crying about a bad grade) he never gave a student a grade. They earned whatever grade they got. Yes some kids aren't as smart as others but I've seen kids who want to be eligible put in a lot of effort to keep up their grades. As far as the system failing kids thats BS. I've seen parents come in and defend their kids to the end that their kid is an angel and the teachers are just out to get them. Not much you can say when the parents are just as ignorant as the kid. If his coaches were on top of things it should have never got to this point. If they tried then it's on this kid and it's his own fault

the thing is you can't rely on parents to teach work ethic and good morals and if the kid doesn't learn that from parents or early schooling, it will effect them and they will be that "bad student" when really no one showed them how to be a good one. Not saying you are wrong, education is just a complicated subject. When a child fails, usually everyone is somewhat involved, parents, teachers and the child.
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Most of my family are teachers. My father just retired as a HS teacher and football coach. He always told his players they are students first. He would also tell players (usually ones crying about a bad grade) he never gave a student a grade. They earned whatever grade they got. Yes some kids aren't as smart as others but I've seen kids who want to be eligible put in a lot of effort to keep up their grades. As far as the system failing kids thats BS. I've seen parents come in and defend their kids to the end that their kid is an angel and the teachers are just out to get them. Not much you can say when the parents are just as ignorant as the kid. If his coaches were on top of things it should have never got to this point. If they tried then it's on this kid and it's his own fault

the thing is you can't rely on parents to teach work ethic and good morals and if the kid doesn't learn that from parents or early schooling, it will effect them and they will be that "bad student" when really no one showed them how to be a good one. Not saying you are wrong, education is just a complicated subject. When a child fails, usually everyone is somewhat involved, parents, teachers and the child.

 

You're right. Sometimes a teacher can positively affect a child when their parents are failing them. However, that job because exponentially tougher when the parents suck. Ultimately, if the parents suck and the teachers aren't able to reach the kid to make him/her improve, the majority of the fault still falls on the parents. It's the parent's job to make sure the child comes to school prepared to succeed and with the right attitude.

 

(no, this isn't any indication of how I feel about this kid's parents. I don't knot them at all or anything really about the situation. I'm talking in general)

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Most of my family are teachers. My father just retired as a HS teacher and football coach. He always told his players they are students first. He would also tell players (usually ones crying about a bad grade) he never gave a student a grade. They earned whatever grade they got. Yes some kids aren't as smart as others but I've seen kids who want to be eligible put in a lot of effort to keep up their grades. As far as the system failing kids thats BS. I've seen parents come in and defend their kids to the end that their kid is an angel and the teachers are just out to get them. Not much you can say when the parents are just as ignorant as the kid. If his coaches were on top of things it should have never got to this point. If they tried then it's on this kid and it's his own fault

the thing is you can't rely on parents to teach work ethic and good morals and if the kid doesn't learn that from parents or early schooling, it will effect them and they will be that "bad student" when really no one showed them how to be a good one. Not saying you are wrong, education is just a complicated subject. When a child fails, usually everyone is somewhat involved, parents, teachers and the child.

You're right. Sometimes a teacher can positively affect a child when their parents are failing them. However, that job because exponentially tougher when the parents suck. Ultimately, if the parents suck and the teachers aren't able to reach the kid to make him/her improve, the majority of the fault still falls on the parents. It's the parent's job to make sure the child comes to school prepared to succeed and with the right attitude.

 

(no, this isn't any indication of how I feel about this kid's parents. I don't knot them at all or anything really about the situation. I'm talking in general)

the thing that sucks is it is all a cycle usually. Bad parenting can create major problems in school and just about everything else with a child, including when they grow up and have a kid of their own. They still operate by the broken system they learned from their parents and pass it to their children unless the child is strong enough to go against what they were taught at an early age and can restructure how they operate and break the cycle. Bad parents make more bad parents who in turn make undisciplined and uninterested children. It's crazy how much parenting can effect outcomes in a child's life, but everything they know comes from the parents so it makes sense

 

Same disclaimer you posted, I don't know the parents so I'm not saying they are bad. Early struggles in school can be attributed to many things. The main thing is to not blame the child necessarily, because they have a reason for whatever they are doing wrong or poorly, and the root of the cause should be explored and exterminated rather than punishment for acts themselves

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FWIW, (probably the wrong spot for this) I took a class with Terrell Newby. Teacher made everyone stand up in class and read. He can't read any better than my 10-year-old brother could.

Harrison Beck couldn't either. I had Space Rocks for Rocks class with him back in the day.

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