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TGHusker

One Millennial's Thoughts from the Coffee Shop

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My Dad sent me this.  I didn't know where to put it so ding dong - I started a thread for it. 

I'm not familiar with the website but I liked her perspective.    She reminds us that for all of our issues, America is blessed beyond any other in so many ways.  She notes that we have an 'entitlement and a ungratefulness' problem.

From their website:

Quote

 

Alpha News uses advanced social media and online technology platforms to deliver important news programming to audiences everywhere in Minnesota. Alpha News reports on issues relating to local, state and federal government, as well as the people and personalities involved. Unlike traditional media, our programming goes beyond the headlines and focuses on issues of local interest that consistently go unreported.

Our news is fueled by citizens and their interests. If you have an idea for a story, please email us at contactus@alphanewsmn.com. We often feature stories from many writers and encourage citizens of Minnesota to submit original content

 

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https://alphanewsmn.com/thoughts-from-a-hipster-coffee-shop/

from the article:

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I’m sitting in a small coffee shop near Nokomis trying to think of what to write about. I scroll through my newsfeed on my phone looking at the latest headlines of Democratic candidates calling for policies to “fix” the so-called injustices of capitalism. I put my phone down and continue to look around. I see people talking freely, working on their MacBook’s, ordering food they get in an instant, seeing cars go by outside, and it dawned on me. We live in the most privileged time in the most prosperous nation and we’ve become completely blind to it. Vehicles, food, technology, freedom to associate with whom we choose. These things are so ingrained in our American way of life we don’t give them a second thought. We are so well off here in the United States that our poverty line begins 31 times above the global average. Thirty. One. Times. Virtually no one in the United States is considered poor by global standards. Yet, in a time where we can order a product off Amazon with one click and have it at our doorstep the next day, we are unappreciative, unsatisfied, and ungrateful.

Our unappreciation is evident as the popularity of socialist policies among my generation continues to grow. Democratic Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez recently said to Newsweek talking about the millennial generation, “An entire generation, which is now becoming one of the largest electorates in America, came of age and never saw American prosperity.”

Never saw American prosperity. Let that sink in. When I first read that statement, I thought to myself, that was quite literally the most entitled and factually illiterate thing I’ve ever heard in my 26 years on this earth. Now, I’m not attributing Miss Ocasio-Cortez’s words to outright dishonesty. I do think she whole-heartedly believes the words she said to be true. Many young people agree with her, which is entirely misguided. My generation is being indoctrinated by a mainstream narrative to actually believe we have never seen prosperity. I know this first hand, I went to college, let’s just say I didn’t have the popular opinion, but I digress.

Let me lay down some universal truths really quick. The United States of America has lifted more people out of abject poverty, spread more freedom and democracy, and has created more innovation in technology and medicine than any other nation in human history. Not only that but our citizenry continually breaks world records with charitable donations, the rags to riches story is not only possible in America but not uncommon, we have the strongest purchasing power on earth, and we encompass 25% of the world’s GDP. The list goes on. However, these universal truths don’t matter. We are told that income inequality is an existential crisis (even though this is not an indicator of prosperity, some of the poorest countries in the world have low-income inequality), we are told that we are oppressed by capitalism (even though it’s brought about more freedom and wealth to the most people than any other system in world history), we are told that the only way we will acquire the benefits of true prosperity is through socialism and centralization of federal power (even though history has proven time and again this only brings tyranny and suffering).

Why then, with all of the overwhelming evidence around us, evidence that I can even see sitting at a coffee shop, do we not view this as prosperity? We have people who are dying to get into our country. People around the world destitute and truly impoverished. Yet, we have a young generation convinced they’ve never seen prosperity, and as a result, elect politicians dead set on taking steps towards abolishing capitalism. Why? The answer is this, my generation has ONLY seen prosperity. We have no contrast. We didn’t live in the great depression, or live through two world wars, or see the rise and fall of socialism and communism. We don’t know what it’s like not to live without the internet, without cars, without smartphones. We don’t have a lack of prosperity problem. We have an entitlement problem, an ungratefulness problem, and it’s spreading like a plague.

With the current political climate giving rise to the misguided idea of a socialist utopia, will we see the light? Or will we have to lose it all to realize that what we have now is true prosperity? Destroying the free market will undo what millions of people have died to achieve.

My generation is becoming the largest voting bloc in the country. We have an opportunity to continue to propel us forward with the gifts capitalism and democracy has given us. The other option is that we can fall into the trap of entitlement and relapse into restrictive socialist destitution. The choice doesn’t seem too hard, does it?

 

 

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This is the dumbest kind of conservative propaganda, but the kind grandma and grandpa eat up and forward on because it's all "Rah! Rah! 'MERICA!" and stuff.

 

Because America is more prosperous than poverty-stricken countries, no one in America can be downtrodden?

 

Because some impoverished countries have small income inequality, Americans can't be adversely affected by income inequality, or income inequality isn't a problem?

 

Because some socialist countries have had tyranny and suffering, it will always lead to that, while (the implication is) capitalism won't?  Sweden and Iceland say hello from the world of socialism. Greece and Portugal say hello from the world of capitalism. These kinds of absolute statements are stupid.

 

But, consider the source:

 

Quote

 

In review, Alpha News reports news with poor sourcing such as using a Facebook page as a primary source: Gun-Control Group Issues Apology after Blaming Pro 2nd Amendment Groups and referring to their own experiences such as here: Anti-Sharia, ANTIFA, and Assault. Story selection always favors the right with almost daily negative coverage of Muslims and in particular Rep. Ilhan Omar. When reporting on Muslims it is always negative, typically focusing on crimes they have committed or to illicit fear.

 

Alpha News routinely makes questionable claims such as this: New Evidence Supports Claims That Ilhan Omar Married Her Brother. This is an unproven conspiracy theory. In general, Alpha News reports news that is always favorable to the right and denigrates the left.

 

Overall, we rate Alpha News Questionable based on extreme right bias, poor sourcing of information, promotion of conspiracy theories and anti-Islamic propaganda, as well as a lack of transparency regarding ownership. (M. Huitsing 8/16/2017) Updated (4/19/2019)

 

 

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Ya. That was drivel. 

 

Wanting to not drown in debt due to college or a medical emergency/disease isn’t entitlement, nor is not wanting that for other people. We currently have lots of problems that are a lot worse than they were before.

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knapplc covered most of my reply, but I'll also add that millennials are the first generation that's expected to have a worse life economically than the generation before them. And that's despite millennials being better educated on average.

America’s Millennials Are Waking Up to a Grim Financial Future

The millennial disadvantage is real: Most millennials are worse off financially than parents

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I believe people should take an inventory of their lives and find things they can be grateful for.  But I also believe at the same time people should take an inventory of their lives and find things they can make better.

 

It is possible to be grateful and want more at the same time.

 

 

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21 minutes ago, RedDenver said:

knapplc covered most of my reply, but I'll also add that millennials are the first generation that's expected to have a worse life economically than the generation before them. And that's despite millennials being better educated on average.

America’s Millennials Are Waking Up to a Grim Financial Future

The millennial disadvantage is real: Most millennials are worse off financially than parents

 

It is heavily caused by the greed and entitlement of the Baby Boomer generation, who has caused many of the problems that this editorial claims are not problems.

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I dont' necessarily disagree with some of her thoughts - but will add that the time that American was seen to be the "greatest" was exactly when many 'socialist" ideas were put into place to make it so.  

 

She's just young - I say good on her for having some opinion or at least being open to discussion.

 

And I echo RedDenver - she's going to have a rude awakening unless she's born into a wealthy family.  All that "prosperity" she sees is short lived for her generation.

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I agree that we often take our historically privileged position for granted. Maybe we're even spoiled. Horribly spoiled.

 

But please.

 

Her anecdotal observations in a coffee shop where she is admittedly scrapping for something to write about, is the definition of shallow, and the moment she hangs this on Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, she exposes her one-note agenda. 

 

I'm 59, and I'm genuinely sorry for the s#!t my generation has laid at the feet of Millennials. Income inequity is most definitely a thing. The next generation will be spending a third or more of their income on healthcare --- that's a different America and it's insane. They will likely make less money and die younger than their parents, the first generation in modern times to regress. America is tumbling down the first world standings on any number of things, mostly troublingly in how we educate and treat our children. The same children who are at a statistically higher risk of being killed by gunfire than active U.S. service members. That's neither good, nor normal. The definition of "prosperity" has also shifted dramatically, and that's where the 1% vs 99% thing comes in. Her publishers at Alpha News court working and middle class Americans to feel sorry for the real victims of class warfare --- the billionaires. Again: insane. 

 

We also f#&%ed up the Earth pretty bad, but by her reasoning if you can afford a latte and a cell phone you have no room to complain. 

 

And if you really want to dig into this, her "universal truths" about America's greatness are not necessarily universal or truthful. 

 

Interestingly enough, it was Donald Trump who ran on the platform "The American Dream is Dead!"

 

Look it up, coffee shop girl. 

 

 

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My thoughts in posting it was to emphasize  the positive. In the era of Trump and in spite of him, there are still things to be positive about.   Yes there are major issues to resolve and yes we have a dufus in the WH that makes it worse but we still have a lot of benefits in this country to not take for granted.  We should not discount the issues that need to be resolved (as mentioned by several above) but yet at the same time - only looking at the issues and not the blessings makes for one negative person.  On HB we are too often focused on the negative- me included.  

 

 

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In fairness, I remind my teenage kids all the time how lucky they have it. Given the times and places a young person could have lived in this world, they hit the jackpot -- with the possible exception of still looming catastrophic climate change and return to violent nationalism.

 

That's why I'd never tell them to shut up and be grateful. There's a lot out there worth fighting for. 

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3 minutes ago, Guy Chamberlin said:

In fairness, I remind my teenage kids all the time how lucky they have it. Given the times and places a young person could have lived in this world, they hit the jackpot -- with the possible exception of still looming catastrophic climate change and return to violent nationalism.

 

That's why I'd never tell them to shut up and be grateful. There's a lot out there worth fighting for. 

Amen.  I was talking to a friend the other day and we were concerned about those 2 items for our kids and grandkids - what kind of world will they get. 

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17 minutes ago, TGHusker said:

My thoughts in posting it was to emphasize  the positive. In the era of Trump and in spite of him, there are still things to be positive about.   Yes there are major issues to resolve and yes we have a dufus in the WH that makes it worse but we still have a lot of benefits in this country to not take for granted.  We should not discount the issues that need to be resolved (as mentioned by several above) but yet at the same time - only looking at the issues and not the blessings makes for one negative person.  On HB we are too often focused on the negative- me included.  

 

 

 

 

The tone of her writing was extremely negative, trying to minimize legitimate issues people in this country face and the country itself faces. The whole point was to belittle those people.

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17 minutes ago, Moiraine said:

 

 

The tone of her writing was extremely negative, trying to minimize legitimate issues people in this country face and the country itself faces. The whole point was to belittle those people.

 

Negative and just flat out wrong. No elected politician is attempting to "Destroy the free market" like she says. Trying to enact policies so people don't drown in obscene student loan debt, or medical bills isn't an attempt to create a "Socialist Utopia" it's an attempt to get us caught up to the rest of the developed world. Most policies proposed by the left have been proven effective through out our contemporary nations. Blatantly uninformed articles like this do not further any kind of dialogue.  

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It honestly reads as someone who can't or won't tolerate any critique of capitalism whatsoever. We can only consider the good aspects of capitalism and the bad aspects of socialism. The free market itself, left alone, will forgive all sins and provide all that we need.

 

Pieces like this are meant to head off any legitimate criticism of American capitalism, because the flaws and imperfections are becoming more and more apparent.

 

 

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If she would have just stayed with the positives and being grateful for having the luxuries of a first world country, that would be one thing. But this just comes across as the "if you don't like it, then leave" mentality. We can be grateful to be living in America and still want to make it better.

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There are also a million places she could be hanging out that would draw a much different picture than the hipster coffee shop where she felt safe to mock millennials. 

 

For that matter our Starbucks, located in one of the wealthiest counties in America, is a magnet for homeless and mentally challenged citizens of all ages.  

 

 

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3 hours ago, Guy Chamberlin said:

The next generation will be spending a third or more of their income on healthcare --- that's a different America and it's insane.

 

 

Where did you get your numbers for this?

 

I pay for my own health insurance and it is just under 6% of my gross annual income.

 

There is so much exaggeration and political theater from both sides of the aisle that I did some real math on myself.

 

And I acknowledge it's a sample size of 1.

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17 minutes ago, TheSker said:

Where did you get your numbers for this?

 

I pay for my own health insurance and it is just under 6% of my gross annual income.

 

There is so much exaggeration and political theater from both sides of the aisle that I did some real math on myself.

 

And I acknowledge it's a sample size of 1.

 

You either have a really good job, or really poor health insurance. 

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40 minutes ago, TheSker said:

Where did you get your numbers for this?

 

I pay for my own health insurance and it is just under 6% of my gross annual income.

 

There is so much exaggeration and political theater from both sides of the aisle that I did some real math on myself.

 

And I acknowledge it's a sample size of 1.

I did a quick Google search, nothing in depth.  But it looks like the average cost of health insurance per month is around $475 (without subsidy), family plans average around $1100 per month.  This doesn't include deductibles or co-pays.  The median US income is around $32000 per person ($2666 per month), or $60000 per household ($5000 per month).  That's 18% of income spent on premiums for just one person, or around 20% for a family. 

 

My wife is a nurse at Methodist in Omaha, it's descent insurance (not the best, but definitely not the worst).  The deductibles paid the year we had our kids, the year our kids had RSV, the year our kids had tonsils out, the year I had a melanoma removed, etc...  all different years, all a significant amount more than what we paid in premiums.

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10 minutes ago, funhusker said:

I did a quick Google search, nothing in depth.  But it looks like the average cost of health insurance per month is around $475 (without subsidy), family plans average around $1100 per month.  This doesn't include deductibles or co-pays.  The median US income is around $32000 per person ($2666 per month), or $60000 per household ($5000 per month).  That's 18% of income spent on premiums for just one person, or around 20% for a family. 

Thank you for looking this up.

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Just now, TheSker said:

Thank you for looking this up.

I was curious too.  I'm not at the 33% of monthly even with my personal examples.  But I also know that my family has it a whole lot better than most.

 

I am also a sample size of 1 :thumbs

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28 minutes ago, Cdog923 said:

 

You either have a really good job, or really poor health insurance. 

He probably has group insurance through his work. A little over 4% of my paycheck goes toward my premium.

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26 minutes ago, jsneb83 said:

He probably has group insurance through his work. A little over 4% of my paycheck goes toward my premium.

I pay for my own health insurance.

 

As I clearly wrote in my post.

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1 minute ago, TheSker said:

I pay for my own health insurance.

 

As I clearly wrote in my post.

My bad

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It's great that there's honest discussion about the main topic here. Most people who post in P&R - the ones who last - are here for honest, thoughtful discussion.

 

But let's be real. The website this came from is Baby Boomer propaganda. Your grandma is posting this on Facebook, or forwarding it to her email pals. This is easily debunked bunk. It's pablum meant to make a generation who f#&%ed up feel better about their f#&%ups. 

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5 minutes ago, knapplc said:

It's great that there's honest discussion about the main topic here. Most people who post in P&R - the ones who last - are here for honest, thoughtful discussion.

 

But let's be real. The website this came from is Baby Boomer propaganda. Your grandma is posting this on Facebook, or forwarding it to her email pals. This is easily debunked bunk. It's pablum meant to make a generation who f#&%ed up feel better about their f#&%ups. 

I'm not going to fault "grandma" for wanting AC after growing up in hot Nebraska summers.

I won't fault grandma for wanting indoor plumbing.

I won't fault grandma for wanting easier to cook meals for her kids.

I won't fault grandma for wanting to drive a car that gets 10 mpg instead of a buggy.

I won't fault grandma for supporting an economy that stripped the earth of resources (due to available technology) to make her family's life better.

I won't fault grandma for wanting to retire at 65.

 

But I will, sure as hell, fault grandma for not recognizing the situation we are currently in and actively rejecting available technology and research to make it better.  

 

 

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Just now, funhusker said:

I'm not going to fault "grandma" for wanting AC after growing up in hot Nebraska summers. 

I won't fault grandma for wanting indoor plumbing. 

I won't fault grandma for wanting easier to cook meals for her kids. 

I won't fault grandma for wanting to drive a car that gets 10 mpg instead of a buggy.

I won't fault grandma for supporting an economy that stripped the earth of resources (due to available technology) to make her family's life better.

I won't fault grandma for wanting to retire at 65.

 

But I will, sure as hell, fault grandma for not recognizing the situation we are currently in and actively rejecting available technology and research to make it better.  

 

 

 

As a Gen-Xer, my grandma lived through all of that. But she didn't work her a$$ off on a farm with no A/C and raise four kids so she could pull the ladder up behind her when she got somewhere and achieved something through her hard work.

 

I don't know why the generation she raised did that. It wasn't through direct efforts on the part of the Greatest Generation. Maybe it was benevolent ignorance. But the kids that generation raised - the Boomers - should be better than they are. Instead a ton of them are gullible ignoramuses that too easily blame the children they raised for the troubles they caused.

 

All I know is, I have no beef with Millennials. I like avocado toast. And I'm raising the next generation to be ready to work their a$$ off more than their grandparents, more than me, more than Millennials.

 

Because they're going to have to if they're going to raise grandkids of their own.

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Regarding the OP: this is a lot like the memes that go through social media about how we were raised.

 

"Please share if you rode a bike without a helmet, rode in the back of a pickup without a seat belt, and sat next to grandpa while he smoked to show everyone you survived!"  

 

There is a segment of the population that actually shares it....

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3 minutes ago, knapplc said:

 

As a Gen-Xer, my grandma lived through all of that. But she didn't work her a$$ off on a farm with no A/C and raise four kids so she could pull the ladder up behind her when she got somewhere and achieved something through her hard work.

 

I don't know why the generation she raised did that. It wasn't through direct efforts on the part of the Greatest Generation. Maybe it was benevolent ignorance. But the kids that generation raised - the Boomers - should be better than they are. Instead a ton of them are gullible ignoramuses that too easily blame the children they raised for the troubles they caused.

 

All I know is, I have no beef with Millennials. I like avocado toast. And I'm raising the next generation to be ready to work their a$$ off more than their grandparents, more than me, more than Millennials.

 

Because they're going to have to if they're going to raise grandkids of their own.

My parents never talked politics with us growing up.  But I remember the conversation at around 8/9 I had with my dad when he discovered I killed a robin with my bb gun.  That conversation about responsibility and the importance of everything's place, and importance, in the world stuck with me.  Not until 20 years later did I find out we shared the same voter registration.  Some of the Greatest Generation (my grandparents) did a good job raising the Boomers (my dad).

 

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I wonder where this country would be at if we'd always had a bunch of people saying "everything's great, why are you complaining?" It's people who want things to be better and look for the things we're not doing well at and try to think of ways to fix them (and newsflash, sometimes that's with laws) that make this a great country.

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3 hours ago, funhusker said:

I won't fault grandma for wanting indoor plumbing.

 

 

Me neither. Especially if she lives in Flint Michigan :P

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9 hours ago, funhusker said:

I did a quick Google search, nothing in depth.  But it looks like the average cost of health insurance per month is around $475 (without subsidy), family plans average around $1100 per month.  This doesn't include deductibles or co-pays.  The median US income is around $32000 per person ($2666 per month), or $60000 per household ($5000 per month).  That's 18% of income spent on premiums for just one person, or around 20% for a family. 

 

My wife is a nurse at Methodist in Omaha, it's descent insurance (not the best, but definitely not the worst).  The deductibles paid the year we had our kids, the year our kids had RSV, the year our kids had tonsils out, the year I had a melanoma removed, etc...  all different years, all a significant amount more than what we paid in premiums.

 

Pretty close to where Im at. My premium at 31 years old is $469 per month with united healthcare and a $1500 deductible. 

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I read this last night on the way home and wanted to take time to think about it and respond from an actual computer instead of my phone.

 

When I read things like this, I find myself being bi-polar.  In one sentence, I'll say, "Hell ya". Then the next, I'll say, "Well that's BS".  

 

It is true that we are an extremely successful country where the vast majority of our population is living very well.  It's also true that many people who are living very well, don't recognize how nice they have it and only concentrate on the negatives of the day.  I find myself falling into this.  I'll be frustrated about whatever happened that day, go home and be frustrated all day while I'm living in a nice house, able to take care of a very nice yard (my baby during the summer) drink a very good beer on the back deck while my kids are off to college earning a good degree to live a nice life on their own.  

 

One heck of a lot of that is due to living in a great country with capitalism that has allowed me to earn a good living.

 

That said, capitalism is not the only force that has made this country successful.  Ever since the founding of our country, we have lived in a combination of capitalism and socialism.  I believe we are as successful as we are BECAUSE throughout the years this country has existed, we have found a pretty good balance of the two.  When the west was settled, socialism allowed the government to go through with the Louisiana Purchase and have the Homestead Act that allowed people to come out and claim the land.  Capitalism allowed them to take the land and make a good living off of it.  Socialism has allowed farmers to have a steady income throughout the 20th century and into the 21st.  Capitalism has allowed for their products to be developed into marketable commodities to be sold.  

 

This is just one example of how both forces work together.  And, it is a good example of how people can be hypocritical in this debate.  Our form of government shouldn't be about which one is good and which one is evil. It should be about where that balance is.  Sometimes each one goes too far and needs corrected.

 

Another part of the op-ed that I have problems with is the fact that, just because we are in an extremely wealthy and successful country, this doesn't mean we don't have people struggling and problems that need solved.  An extreme example of this is the state of California and their housing issues.  One could look from 30,000 feet and proclaim...wow...what an extremely successful state.  Look at all the wealth.  Meanwhile, so many people can't afford a house there that they are literally living in campers.

 

As Knapp said.  This is a propaganda piece that was written to get a lot of "Hell Yas".  The problem is, like many pieces like this, it doesn't tell the whole story.

 

All that said.   I wish more people would recognized really how well off we have it in this country.....while working to fix the problems.

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12 hours ago, TheSker said:

Where did you get your numbers for this?

 

I pay for my own health insurance and it is just under 6% of my gross annual income.

 

There is so much exaggeration and political theater from both sides of the aisle that I did some real math on myself.

 

And I acknowledge it's a sample size of 1.

 

About a year ago, I went on the exchange to just see where the premiums were for a family like mine.  I was absolutely shocked.  For a family of 5 (3 kids) and all very healthy, our premiums were something like $35,000 per year.  That would be one hell of a lot higher than your 6% for my income.  

 

Pardon me if I don't do that again.  I received phone calls constantly for the next 9 months trying to sell me health insurance.  

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19 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

I read this last night on the way home and wanted to take time to think about it and respond from an actual computer instead of my phone.

 

When I read things like this, I find myself being bi-polar.  In one sentence, I'll say, "Hell ya". Then the next, I'll say, "Well that's BS".  

 

It is true that we are an extremely successful country where the vast majority of our population is living very well.  It's also true that many people who are living very well, don't recognize how nice they have it and only concentrate on the negatives of the day.  I find myself falling into this.  I'll be frustrated about whatever happened that day, go home and be frustrated all day while I'm living in a nice house, able to take care of a very nice yard (my baby during the summer) drink a very good beer on the back deck while my kids are off to college earning a good degree to live a nice life on their own.  

 

One heck of a lot of that is due to living in a great country with capitalism that has allowed me to earn a good living.

 

That said, capitalism is not the only force that has made this country successful.  Ever since the founding of our country, we have lived in a combination of capitalism and socialism.  I believe we are as successful as we are BECAUSE throughout the years this country has existed, we have found a pretty good balance of the two.  When the west was settled, socialism allowed the government to go through with the Louisiana Purchase and have the Homestead Act that allowed people to come out and claim the land.  Capitalism allowed them to take the land and make a good living off of it.  Socialism has allowed farmers to have a steady income throughout the 20th century and into the 21st.  Capitalism has allowed for their products to be developed into marketable commodities to be sold.  

 

This is just one example of how both forces work together.  And, it is a good example of how people can be hypocritical in this debate.  Our form of government shouldn't be about which one is good and which one is evil. It should be about where that balance is.  Sometimes each one goes too far and needs corrected.

 

Another part of the op-ed that I have problems with is the fact that, just because we are in an extremely wealthy and successful country, this doesn't mean we don't have people struggling and problems that need solved.  An extreme example of this is the state of California and their housing issues.  One could look from 30,000 feet and proclaim...wow...what an extremely successful state.  Look at all the wealth.  Meanwhile, so many people can't afford a house there that they are literally living in campers.

 

As Knapp said.  This is a propaganda piece that was written to get a lot of "Hell Yas".  The problem is, like many pieces like this, it doesn't tell the whole story.

 

All that said.   I wish more people would recognized really how well off we have it in this country.....while working to fix the problems.

BRB - I wished I would have said all of this in my original post.  You nailed it from my perspective.

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16 hours ago, TheSker said:

Where did you get your numbers for this?

 

I pay for my own health insurance and it is just under 6% of my gross annual income.

 

There is so much exaggeration and political theater from both sides of the aisle that I did some real math on myself.

 

And I acknowledge it's a sample size of 1.

 

I acknowledge that I got that number from a healthcare expert talking on a radio show. I remembered it because it was pretty alarming, but nothing in my Google search backs it up beyond the assumption that healthcare costs and real income will continue at present rates to smack millennials in the future.

 

2018 figures are all over the place. A national average of 10% of income on health insurance premiums (not including out of pocket expenses), some states coming in at 6.5%, others over 15%. Since we are a nation of 300 million, that still leaves millions of people without subsidies already spending a third of their income on healthcare. My anecdotal example is my wife's new job, where her healthcare "benefit" costs our family of four $2,700 a month, slightly more than a third of her salary. And that's gross salary, not take home salary. I thought that was outrageous, so I asked around and found out it was not uncommon. 

 

Sorry if my example was overly alarmist, but I don't think it's political theater that healthcare costs are having a huge impact on America's pocketbook, that it continues to get worse, and that other countries seem to be doing a better job of it. 

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Would any Boomer or Xer here trade places with a Millennial? Why or why not? 

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Just now, Fru said:

Would any Boomer or Xer here trade places with a Millennial? 

If I was in my 60's, I'd love to have the chance to go back to 25!

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Just now, BigRedBuster said:

yes

 

 

Could you elaborate why?

 

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2 minutes ago, funhusker said:

If I was in my 60's, I'd love to have the chance to go back to 25!

 

Not quite what I meant. 25 in 1980 isn't exactly the same as 25 in 2019. 

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13 minutes ago, Fru said:

 

Could you elaborate why?

 

You have to ask?

I'm 52 years old.  I've lived a decent life with a wonderful wife and kids.  I would love to do that all over again.  And....I think my kids have a pretty good life ahead of them.  Are there problems?  Sure.  But, I grew up during the farm crisis which caused my parents to have to take bankruptcy while I was in HS and the aftermath of Vietnam.  I lived through the Cold war where I was ducking under my school desk in fear of nuclear attacks.  I was born around the time a President, Presidential candidate and a civil rights leader were all assassinated and the world was still hurt by that.  When I was young, my parents were dealing with the Carter years with interest rates around 18% and the economy was a constant problem.  My parents weren't able to help me hardly at all because of this through college. Worked full time while going to school full time.

 

This gets to the point of "Make America Great Again".  Well....what era are we trying to get back to so we can get out of this horrible time?  I believe these times are pretty good.  My kids get to live in an era with technology that allows them to do amazing things and jobs dealing with that technology is only going to grow.  

 

My kids are living in an era where we have extremely low unemployment.  The Baby Boomers are now mostly out of the work force and they need replaced.  Jobs should not be a problem for people who have skills.  

 

I don't mean to minimize the issues we have to deal with today.  But, to act like they are so much worse than when I was a kid....well.....is being naive.  

 

I guess my question to you is....why wouldn't I want to be 25 again?

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5 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

You have to ask?

I'm 52 years old.  I've lived a decent life with a wonderful wife and kids.  I would love to do that all over again.  And....I think my kids have a pretty good life ahead of them.  Are there problems?  Sure.  But, I grew up during the farm crisis which caused my parents to have to take bankruptcy while I was in HS and the aftermath of Vietnam.  I lived through the Cold war where I was ducking under my school desk in fear of nuclear attacks.  I was born around the time a President, Presidential candidate and a civil rights leader were all assassinated and the world was still hurt by that.  When I was young, my parents were dealing with the Carter years with interest rates around 18% and the economy was a constant problem.  My parents weren't able to help me hardly at all because of this through college. Worked full time while going to school full time.

 

This gets to the point of "Make America Great Again".  Well....what era are we trying to get back to so we can get out of this horrible time?  I believe these times are pretty good.  My kids get to live in an era with technology that allows them to do amazing things and jobs dealing with that technology is only going to grow.  

 

My kids are living in an era where we have extremely low unemployment.  The Baby Boomers are now mostly out of the work force and they need replaced.  Jobs should not be a problem for people who have skills.  

 

I don't mean to minimize the issues we have to deal with today.  But, to act like they are so much worse than when I was a kid....well.....is being naive.  

 

Lol, well yes, I was interested in your rationale.

 

I'm not saying "Would you ever want to be young again?" I meant, if you had a choice, would you choose your version of 25, or today's version of 25?

 

I appreciate your response. I don't think it'd be easy to live thru any of those events. Especially the assassinations. I don't mean to minimize your experience either, but for every farm crisis or interest rate issue, there's the housing market crash, job market crash and plenty of modern economic issues as well. For your Vietnam, we have Iraq and Afghanistan. For your duck and cover drills, we have active shooter drills. Based on your age I'm assuming you graduated from college in the 80s, would you choose working full time and going to school full time back then or today? 

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11 minutes ago, Fru said:

 

Lol, well yes, I was interested in your rationale.

 

I'm not saying "Would you ever want to be young again?" I meant, if you had a choice, would you choose your version of 25, or today's version of 25?

 

I appreciate your response. I don't think it'd be easy to live thru any of those events. Especially the assassinations. I don't mean to minimize your experience either, but for every farm crisis or interest rate issue, there's the housing market crash, job market crash and plenty of modern economic issues as well. For your Vietnam, we have Iraq and Afghanistan. For your duck and cover drills, we have active shooter drills. Based on your age I'm assuming you graduated from college in the 80s, would you choose working full time and going to school full time back then or today? 

My point is, there were major issues back then too.  I acknowledge there are issues now.

 

However, statistically, the world is a much safer place now than any time in history.  The amount of world violence is at an all time low.  US violence has steadily decreased since I graduated form college. ('90).  I'm sure it's because of my life's work.

 

Millennials tend to focus on the world problems of today.  That's understandable.  This is when they are living and they have a life ahead of them that they can influence and make better.  However, sometimes it seems like they really don't have a perspective.  That happens to be an area I agree with the op-ed with.  Millennials really don't have "bad times" they've lived through to have perspective.

 

As for the college question.  Economic times are better now so I can help my kids more than my parents were able to.  They also work a lot during school and will get out with no where close to the average that people claim they have in debt.

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1 hour ago, Fru said:

Would any Boomer or Xer here trade places with a Millennial? Why or why not? 

What an interesting question.

 

I'm an Xer and my first thought is that no, I wouldn't trade. The crap kids have to put up with today on social media isn't worth it.

 

Thanks for giving me something to think about tonight while I walk the dog.

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19 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

My point is, there were major issues back then too.  I acknowledge there are issues now.

 

However, statistically, the world is a much safer place now than any time in history.  The amount of world violence is at an all time low.  US violence has steadily decreased since I graduated form college. ('90).  I'm sure it's because of my life's work.

 

Millennials tend to focus on the world problems of today.  That's understandable.  This is when they are living and they have a life ahead of them that they can influence and make better.  However, sometimes it seems like they really don't have a perspective.  That happens to be an area I agree with the op-ed with.  Millennials really don't have "bad times" they've lived through to have perspective.

 

As for the college question.  Economic times are better now so I can help my kids more than my parents were able to.  They also work a lot during school and will get out with no where close to the average that people claim they have in debt.

 

Very true. There's never been a more peaceful time to be alive. 

 

While I think Millennials have plenty of "bad times" stuff we've lived thru, I think our lack of perspective is overstated. We're the first generation to grow up with such widespread access to technology, which I think gave us an exposure other generations obviously hadn't experienced. 

 

I think the "bad times" thing applies to the US as a whole as well. We've never really had to band together and rebuild. Maybe the closest thing to that was after the Depression or during WWII? But even then, the US wasn't ravaged the way other countries were. It makes me think of this clip from "Sicko." Since we've never really had to "band together" we've developed a more individualistic and "Well why shouldhave to pay for xyz?" mindset. 

 

 

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25 minutes ago, BigRedBuster said:

Millennials tend to focus on the world problems of today.  That's understandable.  This is when they are living and they have a life ahead of them that they can influence and make better.  However, sometimes it seems like they really don't have a perspective.  That happens to be an area I agree with the op-ed with.  Millennials really don't have "bad times" they've lived through to have perspective.

 

I did that as a teenager in the 80s. I thought the threats from the end of the Cold War were awful, the inner-city violence was horrible, and stuff like the bombing of the hotel in Beirut were the worst things to happen.

 

Turns out, they were just the worst things that I was aware of.

 

Vietnam was worse than anything that happened in the 80s. Watergate was worse. The Kennedy assassination was worse than Reagan getting shot. Korea was worse than any of the conflicts I lived through as a kid. The World Wars were many orders of magnitude worse.

 

Just like older generations continue to devalue and decry younger generations (and have since the dawn of time), younger generations devalue the experiences of older generations.

 

Millennials and whatever the generation coming after them are called have it worse than recent previous generations in some ways because greed is taking away things older generations took for granted - cheap school, cheap healthcare, cheap gas, cheap food. College-educated Millennials start their adult lives in debt I couldn't imagine. I can't fathom how they're going to get ahead, buy a house, pay for their own kids. They're starting off in such stupid financial holes it's ridiculous.

 

I don't buy the concept that social media makes life harder for kids today. You can block or ignore people who harass you online. We had awful bullying and teasing when I was a kid, same as Millennials deal with, same as kids 100 and 1,000 years ago dealt with. Social media doesn't amplify that, and in fact I'd say it was far harder to deal with when it was all in your face. My junior high and high schools had about two fights a week, every week. Kids just kicked the crap out of each other, and often it was some weak kid getting bullied, often by a group. It's not worse or better than what Millennials go through, it's just different.

 

The biggest problem between generations is lack of perspective. 

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4 minutes ago, knapplc said:

 

I did that as a teenager in the 80s. I thought the threats from the end of the Cold War were awful, the inner-city violence was horrible, and stuff like the bombing of the hotel in Beirut were the worst things to happen.

 

Turns out, they were just the worst things that I was aware of.

 

Vietnam was worse than anything that happened in the 80s. Watergate was worse. The Kennedy assassination was worse than Reagan getting shot. Korea was worse than any of the conflicts I lived through as a kid. The World Wars were many orders of magnitude worse.

 

Just like older generations continue to devalue and decry younger generations (and have since the dawn of time), younger generations devalue the experiences of older generations.

 

Millennials and whatever the generation coming after them are called have it worse than recent previous generations in some ways because greed is taking away things older generations took for granted - cheap school, cheap healthcare, cheap gas, cheap food. College-educated Millennials start their adult lives in debt I couldn't imagine. I can't fathom how they're going to get ahead, buy a house, pay for their own kids. They're starting off in such stupid financial holes it's ridiculous.

 

I don't buy the concept that social media makes life harder for kids today. You can block or ignore people who harass you online. We had awful bullying and teasing when I was a kid, same as Millennials deal with, same as kids 100 and 1,000 years ago dealt with. Social media doesn't amplify that, and in fact I'd say it was far harder to deal with when it was all in your face. My junior high and high schools had about two fights a week, every week. Kids just kicked the crap out of each other, and often it was some weak kid getting bullied, often by a group. It's not worse or better than what Millennials go through, it's just different.

 

The biggest problem between generations is lack of perspective. 

 

One thing I always chuckle at now that I'm 50+ is kids acting like, "you're old, you don't understand".  Well, I'm sure I had some of that attitude growing up.  But, now I just think....dude.....you don't know what you're talking about when you say that.

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1 minute ago, BigRedBuster said:

 

One thing I always chuckle at now that I'm 50+ is kids acting like, "you're old, you don't understand".  Well, I'm sure I had some of that attitude growing up.  But, now I just think....dude.....you don't know what you're talking about when you say that.

 

I'm reasonably certain that I expressed thoughts like that, to my peers for certain, and maybe to older folks when I was a teen or tween.

 

Makes me cringe. It's myopic. Certainly the older generation didn't know my specific experience, but certainly they were more experienced at life in general than me.

 

The problem is that this experience doesn't always equate to wisdom. I'm pretty sure the beef Millennials have isn't with Gen-Xers like me, but with the unwise and therefore reckless and disrespectful folks who immediately dismiss them because of their age/inexperience.

 

The older I get, the more I learn how little I know, and the more I value more people's opinions. Maybe when I'm 80 I'll be really good at that.

 

Maybe that's what they mean when they say you've become "enlightened."

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