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You can say it's supposed to be an AD call all you want, but when your boss tells you not to do something...

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Question: B1G, are you going to play football this fall?   B1G:

The original goal was to “flatten the curve” or so we were told. Somewhere we shifted to cancel everything until it is gone or a vaccine is found. 

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24 minutes ago, Archy1221 said:

We’re not told we have to do those things because we live in a free society for better or worse.  We will never be a society that says you can’t leave your house. 

 

We do not enjoy pure Freedom. If you need a test for that, try walking into your local bank vault and helping yourself to whatever you see. Let us know in 10-20 years how that goes for you.

 

 

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39 minutes ago, onlyHskrfaninIL said:

he didnt say pure freedom.  but hey keep moving those goalposts

 

Take the stage. Tell us from beginning to end what the truth of this is. March through today. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Archy1221 said:

Your making the exact mistake everyone else does when taking about this pandemic for the US.  
Yes, as a country we HAVE flattened any curve their might have been.  INDIVIDUAL States have had spikes but the US as a whole has never been in danger of the health system being over run.  Even at its peak in individual states, they have all been stressed but fine.  
 

stop looking at this from a national scale and begin looking at this from an individual county in each state standpoint.  

Do you understand the definition of "flattening the curve"?

 

This is flattening the curve:

Flattening the Curve for COVID-19: What Does It Mean and How Can ...

 

Meanwhile in the US, the  curve looks like this:

 

image.png

We plateaued and then started up again after Memorial Day and we continue to rise.  Note this graph is of Active Cases - meaning Positive Tests - Cases with Resolutions (recovery or death)

 

As far as no health care systems being overwhelmed, I'm not so sure in the case of New York (City).  Anytime you have so many bodies piling up so fast you have to use refrigerated trucks to store all the bodies you have a problem.  Unless, that is, one considers it a bonus to have enough people die that hospital beds keep opening up, for the next set of ready to die victims.

 

And looking at things from the point of each US state being a separate "country" is EXACTLY why we are in such bad shape as a nation - States do not have the right to just close off their borders to all other states (nor would they since they need truck traffic, etc.).  With policies that vary radically from state to state, we ended up with a hodge-podge that basically left certain areas doing ok, then getting a delayed explosion in cases.  Florida, for example.

 

This hodge-podge meant that things like sports, happening across all states (football teams are going to have to travel across 1 or more state boundaries for ~1/2 of their games) left the situation very tenuous. 

 

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if i learned anything from this demic, it was how much power the govs  and mayors have over their constituents.

the President , Fed and CDC are merely advisors. the people do what the hell they want, it's how America has always worked.

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6 minutes ago, hunter49 said:

if i learned anything from this demic, it was how much power the govs  and mayors have over their constituents.

the President , Fed and CDC are merely advisors. the people do what the hell they want, it's how America has always worked.

Some of that you should’ve learned in high school civics class, to be fair. 

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7 minutes ago, hunter49 said:

if i learned anything from this demic, it was how much power the govs  and mayors have over their constituents.

the President , Fed and CDC are merely advisors. the people do what the hell they want, it's how America has always worked.

And I respectfully disagree.  I learned that sometimes the president has to do what’s best for all. Should have shut it all down in March. But even I thought his plan was sound back then. 

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21 minutes ago, Jason Sitoke said:

Some of that you should’ve learned in high school civics class, to be fair. 

 

I always look at things like this (and POTUS thinking that WWII ended in 1918) as job security. 

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52 minutes ago, hunter49 said:

if i learned anything from this demic, it was how much power the govs  and mayors have over their constituents.

the President , Fed and CDC are merely advisors. the people do what the hell they want, it's how America has always worked.

 

It is in the name- United States of America

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1 hour ago, knapplc said:

 

Take the stage. Tell us from beginning to end what the truth of this is. March through today. 

 

 

why so you can twist my words like the last guy?  you seem to know it all anyways i'm sure you dont need me to tell you

 

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As a nation and as states, we have not flattened the curve:

 

"According to UT's model, Texas is predicted to see a steep increase in coronavirus deaths by the end of August. By Aug. 31, the model predicts nearly 23,460 Texans will have died from coronavirus. As of Aug. 10, 8,459 people have died, according to the State's coronavirus dashboard"

 

https://www.kvue.com/article/news/health/coronavirus/coronavirus-ut-deaths-prediction-model-texas-austin-august-cases-update/269-f3523a4a-658f-460a-aff7-5bfa369d7067

 

For those keeping score at home, COVID-related deaths in Texas are predicted to nearly triple in the next 2 weeks

 

We were supposed to be in a lull right now and all plans related to K-12 and college education and athletics were premised on that assumption.  But instead the entire footprint of the SEC, ACC, and Big 12 will be a complete horrorshow in the next month or so.

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3 hours ago, Rochelobe said:

Do you understand the definition of "flattening the curve"?

 

This is flattening the curve:

Flattening the Curve for COVID-19: What Does It Mean and How Can ...

 

Meanwhile in the US, the  curve looks like this:

 

image.png

We plateaued and then started up again after Memorial Day and we continue to rise.  Note this graph is of Active Cases - meaning Positive Tests - Cases with Resolutions (recovery or death)

 

As far as no health care systems being overwhelmed, I'm not so sure in the case of New York (City).  Anytime you have so many bodies piling up so fast you have to use refrigerated trucks to store all the bodies you have a problem.  Unless, that is, one considers it a bonus to have enough people die that hospital beds keep opening up, for the next set of ready to die victims.

 

And looking at things from the point of each US state being a separate "country" is EXACTLY why we are in such bad shape as a nation - States do not have the right to just close off their borders to all other states (nor would they since they need truck traffic, etc.).  With policies that vary radically from state to state, we ended up with a hodge-podge that basically left certain areas doing ok, then getting a delayed explosion in cases.  Florida, for example.

 

This hodge-podge meant that things like sports, happening across all states (football teams are going to have to travel across 1 or more state boundaries for ~1/2 of their games) left the situation very tenuous. 

 

According to your hypothetical graph that shows positive cases going parabolic, that’s assuming the same rate of testing. Now we are testing exponentially more people whether they are symptomatic or not. In that case the graph should be going EXTREMELY parabolic but it’s not. It’s showing a steady incline despite testing exponentially more people, your hypothetical graph doesn’t account for that l. In my opinion we did flatten the curve, but a graph that doesn’t account for the number of people tested is obviously going to paint a different picture. 

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