Jump to content

The George Floyd/Black Lives Matter protests and police conduct


Recommended Posts

I come from the medical field, so my mind when straight to a doc doing something insanely stupid, it caused someones death (mixing up drugs, doing something wrong when a patient is on the table, misreading a chart, ect). These docs are usually charged with manslaughter - this cop shouldn't be treated any differently. You are in a position of great responsibility, you took the job knowing this, you made a fatal mistake - that's manslaughter. 

  • Plus1 1
Link to post

  • Replies 1.4k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Welcome to why nobody knew.             Sorry....couldn't resist.

Protestors in Downtown Des Moines asked officers to take a knee with them for 2 minutes and they'd then leave and abide by the 9pm curfew that was enacted today. Officers agreed and it was 2 minutes o

Saying "I'm your Huckleberry" over and over again to no one in particular.

Posted Images

53 minutes ago, knapplc said:

 

What a gross thing to say.

 

Gross? That is an unusual way to describe it. You're saying you would not hold the police liable in that situation?

Link to post
44 minutes ago, knapplc said:

 

Then the training is ineffective, because she intended to shoot him with a taser and mistakenly shot him with a gun. 

 

An anomaly, unless you know how many times she has used her Taser correctly in the past, to say that her training was not effective. 

 

When a physician kills someone during a surgery, because of a mistake or negligence, do you infer that his medical training was ineffective, despite the fact that the same doctor has performed the same surgery successfully thousands of times? 

 

Or, do you categorize it as a tragic mistake, like this instance was. 

  • Plus1 1
Link to post
5 minutes ago, DevoHusker said:

 

Gross? That is an unusual way to describe it. You're saying you would not hold the police liable in that situation?

 

Clearly not. And it's insulting to insinuate that I would.

  • Plus1 2
Link to post
3 minutes ago, DevoHusker said:

When a physician kills someone during a surgery, because of a mistake or negligence, do you infer that his medical training was ineffective, despite the fact that the same doctor has performed the same surgery successfully thousands of times? 

 

Or, do you categorize it as a tragic mistake, like this instance was. 

I just addressed this above. If a patient dies due to gross negligence, like mixing up a drug (gun/taser situation) - they can and will be charged with manslaughter. Same thing here right?

  • Plus1 2
Link to post

Just now, FrantzHardySwag said:

I just addressed this above. If a patient dies due to gross negligence, like mixing up a drug (gun/taser situation) - they can and will be charged with manslaughter. Same thing here right?

 

Agreed, and they lose their license as well. "Do no harm" is part of the oath I believe. I also agree she should face the consequences of her actions. She has already been fired.

 

My point was more to those saying it was due to her (and in general all police) training that is to blame. She made a tragic mistake. She might have been the best trained, most proficient, officer on their force...we have no idea. 

  • Plus1 1
Link to post
2 minutes ago, DevoHusker said:

 

Agreed, and they lose their license as well. "Do no harm" is part of the oath I believe. I also agree she should face the consequences of her actions. She has already been fired.

 

My point was more to those saying it was due to her (and in general all police) training that is to blame. She made a tragic mistake. She might have been the best trained, most proficient, officer on their force...we have no idea. 

 

She was in fact, a trainer of other officers. She had a trainee with her when it happened, so we do have an idea. 

  • Plus1 1
Link to post
1 minute ago, DevoHusker said:

 

Agreed, and they lose their license as well. "Do no harm" is part of the oath I believe. I also agree she should face the consequences of her actions. She has already been fired.

 

My point was more to those saying it was due to her (and in general all police) training that is to blame. She made a tragic mistake. She might have been the best trained, most proficient, officer on their force...we have no idea. 

I honestly think it's impossible to keep these people out of medicine and law enforcement. Mistakes like this will probably continue to happen.  I don't think it's possible that every Cop and every Doctor will be properly trained - someone will always slip through the cracks. I think it speaks to the importance of charging these officers. People need to know that if you are in a role with this must responsibility, and you make a fatal mistake - you will be held accountable. That's a crucial part of good training. I know when was in school for my specific medical license (not an MD) it was hammered home that someone's life was in my hands and if a mistake was made, my license was on the line and I could be charged. 

  • Plus1 2
Link to post

Sounds like that dudes warrant was for choking a female and holding her at gunpoint.  He was probably headed to the clink for awhile, makes a lot more sense why he tried to get away.  

Link to post

50 minutes ago, teachercd said:

Sounds like that dudes warrant was for choking a female and holding her at gunpoint.  He was probably headed to the clink for awhile, makes a lot more sense why he tried to get away.  

Imagine that 

  • Plus1 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
7 hours ago, knapplc said:

 

I agree that seems like a good idea, but in a high-stress moment you're better off shooting at center mass. @BIGREDIOWAN I believe has mentioned that this is standard training, and I agree.

 

If you have to shoot, shoot to put down, not wound. You wound a guy, especially someone jacked up on the drugs, they're just going to shoot you back.

 

 

Yes this is correct, we are taught to shoot center mass due to our percentage of hits goes way down in a critical situation. We also teach our officers to shoot until the threat is no longer a threat. Not necessarily to kill someone although that's the result in officer involved shootings from time to time. 

 

As far as her mistaking her firearm for a TASER it's unacceptable and I agree it never should've happened, but this HAS happened in law enforcement before across the country and there IS a "reasoning" behind it, it seems, and it has to do with how the officer was dealing with stress, how she was processing that stress, and how she had her TASER located on her belt, and which hand she would normally be drawing with. That's simplifying it quite a bit and I don't really want to be part of the discussion because I usually end up getting bagged on pretty hard in these threads so I'd rather avoid that. But it's a big enough of a liability that I've been training our officers for YEARS on ways to avoid it so they are well versed on how to avoid this very situation. 

  • Plus1 3
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
6 hours ago, FrantzHardySwag said:

I just addressed this above. If a patient dies due to gross negligence, like mixing up a drug (gun/taser situation) - they can and will be charged with manslaughter. Same thing here right?

A doctor being charged with manslaughter is very very rare 

  • Plus1 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
1 hour ago, BIGREDIOWAN said:

Yes this is correct, we are taught to shoot center mass due to our percentage of hits goes way down in a critical situation. We also teach our officers to shoot until the threat is no longer a threat. Not necessarily to kill someone although that's the result in officer involved shootings from time to time. 

 

As far as her mistaking her firearm for a TASER it's unacceptable and I agree it never should've happened, but this HAS happened in law enforcement before across the country and there IS a "reasoning" behind it, it seems, and it has to do with how the officer was dealing with stress, how she was processing that stress, and how she had her TASER located on her belt, and which hand she would normally be drawing with. That's simplifying it quite a bit and I don't really want to be part of the discussion because I usually end up getting bagged on pretty hard in these threads so I'd rather avoid that. But it's a big enough of a liability that I've been training our officers for YEARS on ways to avoid it so they are well versed on how to avoid this very situation. 

 

All around, it is a horrible situation. Anyone watching that bodycam footage can sympathize with the officer. It was a s#!tty situation and she was, as she thought, on a training run, not in a life-and-death situation. Now a guy is gone and she lost her career, and she has to live with that for the rest of her life. There's no good outcome here.

 

It's a damned hard job and often thankless, and if you screw up there's ten thousand people marching in the street pissed off about it.

  • Plus1 3
  • Upvote 1
Link to post
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.






×
×
  • Create New...