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1 minute ago, knapplc said:

 

Now if we can just prove that Ben & Jerry's is the leading culprit of diabetes in racial/ethnic minorities, we can completely disregard their opinion on... whatever it was they contributed a few pages back. We've gone so far down this weird rabbit hole that I forget.  :D

 

I just figure that good ice cream is, by it's nature, designed to be indulgent. Evidently Pelosi agrees with me, she installed a $10,000 fridge to only hold ice cream

chuckleshuffle

 

While I don't have that budget, I certainly understand the mentality. 

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I've always felt the police should be held to a higher standard of obeying the law, compared to the rest of the citizenry.   When in reality they're held to a much lower standard.

@Husker_Bohunk I would never answer if someone talked to me the way you’re talking to BRI. I’d find they aren’t worth talking to. You didn’t even attempt to approach this neutrally.

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3 minutes ago, Moiraine said:

 

 

You're either underthinking it or it's a stupid tweet. No one cares what the total # of stops is when it comes to this. That isn't the topic of interest. It's the % that end in police getting killed. The low or high end % of killings is what's important. I think they that is what they were trying to say but flipped it around.

Is the point of the numbers changed in any way? Seems like a bizarre nit pick when the point of the tweet is clear.

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4 minutes ago, DevoHusker said:

 

https://clinical.diabetesjournals.org/content/30/3/130

The Disparate Impact of Diabetes on Racial/Ethnic Minority Populations

Racial and ethnic minorities, defined as American Indians and Alaska Natives, black or African Americans, Hispanics or Latinos, and Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders, have a higher prevalence and greater burden of diabetes compared to whites, and some minority groups also have higher rates of complications.

 

http://www.diabetesincontrol.com/poverty-a-leading-cause-of-type-2-diabetes-studies-say/#:~:text=Researchers found that living in,the risk by 26 percent. 

 

Prof. Dennis Raphael, one of the researchers, states that, “What we know about Type 2 diabetes is not only are low-income and poor people more likely to get it, but they’re also the ones that, once they get it, are much more likely to suffer complications. And the complications from Type 2 diabetes when they’re bad are really bad, whether it’s amputations, or blindness, or cardiovascular disease.”

Researchers from York University, Toronto, analyzed two sets of data: the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) and the National Population Health Survey (NPHS).  The first set of data showed that for men, being in the lowest-income category (earning less than $15,000 per year), doubles the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes compared to being in one of the highest-income brackets (earning more than $80,000 per year). The risk remains the same when other risk factors are taken into account, such as education, body mass index and physical activity levels.

The findings are even more striking for women in the lowest-income category. For them, the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes is more than triple the risk of women in the highest-income category. When education, body mass index and physical activity levels are taken into account, the risk is still well more than double.

Results from the NPHS analysis are just as striking. Researchers found that living in poverty in the two years prior to diagnosis increased the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by 24 percent, a risk not changed when factoring in weight or physical activity. Living in poverty at any time increased the risk by 26 percent.

Generally speaking, subjects who lived more often in poverty during the 12-year study period had a 41 percent greater chance of developing the disease. When obesity and physical activity levels were taken into account, the risk remained very high, at 36 percent.

The studies are consistent with other findings that link living conditions — what they call the social determinants of health — with Type 2 diabetes, as well as other ailments.

Raphael, a professor of health policy and management at York, said conventional wisdom about Type 2 diabetes would suggest that once obesity, lack of physical activity and other lifestyle risk factors were taken into account, diabetes incidence rates would even out between lower- and higher-income groups.

While weight, a sedentary lifestyle and other health problems are still key risk factors, the findings suggest that health-care workers who specialize in diabetes should be paying closer attention to the socio-economic conditions that can lead to them.

“When you’re in a situation where 15 percent of kids and their families are living in poverty, and people are worried from day-to-day about their jobs and homelessness, and immigrants are not being provided with what they need to be healthy, and the evidence that suggests these are all things that contribute to the onset of Type 2 diabetes, there has to be more of a balance in how we understand the causes of illness,” Raphael said.

But what is it exactly about living in poverty that contributes to Type 2 diabetes?

The studies point to living conditions that put low-income adults and children at risk for myriad diseases, not just diabetes. First of all, there is the chronic stress of low-income living that can adversely affect health. The strain of being short on money and living in inadequate housing, or not having any housing at all, can spike levels of cortisol, a hormone released when the body is under stress. While cortisol helps the body deal with stress, constantly elevated levels can cause a wide range of negative side effects, such as high blood sugar levels or high blood pressure.

Residents of lower-income neighborhoods also often find it difficult to access fresh, healthy foods and programs that promote physical activity, both of which are key to managing stress, controlling weight and, therefore, preventing disease.

Raphael also points to previous research, which suggests adverse circumstances in early childhood, from low birth weight to deprivation as a youngster, raise a child’s risk of developing a number of conditions, from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases to diabetes.

Indeed, a report released this week found that children who have ever lived in poverty have significantly poorer health outcomes than children who have never experienced poverty, ranging from developmental delays and psychological problems to higher rates of asthma and more frequent hospitalizations.

“So we’re basically talking about systematic stress over time, lack of control that eventually leads to higher cortisol levels, among other things. Cortisol and other stuff literally messes up the ability of the body to use the insulin that’s available. And it’s not well understood,” Raphael said.

For another part of their study, the researchers interviewed 60 diabetes patients who reside in low-income neighborhoods. What they learned is that the very conditions that contribute to diabetes also make it extremely difficult to manage the disease, meaning low-income patients are suffering from some of the most debilitating side effects.

Raphael and his team found that insufficient income, inadequate or insecure housing and food insecurity were key barriers to managing the disease. According to their interviews, 72 percent of patients said they lacked the financial resources to follow the kind of diet needed to keep their diabetes in check.

Many said they had to choose between paying rent or feeding their children and managing their disease.

Barriers to better control can include:
  • Lack of access to healthy foods, and free and safe physical activity programs.
  • Stress and isolation, especially for lower-income seniors, which causes blood-sugar levels to spike.
  • High costs of medical equipment, such as blood-sugar test strips. If patients don’t have private health insurance, they are paying for many of these supplies out-of-pocket.

Experts need to advocate for more affordable food, better access to medications and supplies, and more community services to assist lower-income people prevent and treat diabetes.

The findings show that tackling broader issues of poverty — lack of employment or under employment, housing, food security and health coverage — are key to managing diabetes, and other ailments.

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3 minutes ago, DevoHusker said:

 

I just figure that good ice cream is, by it's nature, designed to be indulgent. Evidently Pelosi agrees with me, she installed a $10,000 fridge to only hold ice cream

chuckleshuffle

 

While I don't have that budget, I certainly understand the mentality. 

 

Our chat about "wants" vs. "needs" can apply here, too :lol:

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1 minute ago, DevoHusker said:

 

For sure!! I need the Ben and Jerry's, but really want a new SubZero :thumbs

 

My wife would like one of their wine cabinets, that's for certain. 

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Privilege really is blinding. My family has to remind ourselves about the simple decisions we make every day that aren't so simple literally on the other side of the tracks in our town. Likewise, we're surrounded by the kind of wealth that has completely different reference and decimal points than ours, it's so awkward socializing with people who can't afford to fly their kids and their friends to the Coachella Music Festival that they generally choose not to. These people — and I guess us too -- expect life to work in their favor because it already has. Nancy Pelosi's SubZero for ice cream is my electric bike for not peddling up hills. I'm sure neither of us thinks we need to apologize. 

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1 hour ago, RedDenver said:

Is the point of the numbers changed in any way? Seems like a bizarre nit pick when the point of the tweet is clear.

 

 

Why do you care whether I nitpick?

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12 minutes ago, RedDenver said:

Why bother posting?

 

 

Why the hell not? It's a message board. I post unimportant s#!t on here sometimes. It's not like I'm giving another poster a hard time. I'm posting about some random guy who will never see this. Why harass me about it? Not every post has to be an attempt to make a point of some kind. I was pointing something out because I felt like it.

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2 hours ago, Moiraine said:

Why the hell not? It's a message board. I post unimportant s#!t on here sometimes. It's not like I'm giving another poster a hard time. I'm posting about some random guy who will never see this. Why harass me about it? Not every post has to be an attempt to make a point of some kind. I was pointing something out because I felt like it.

Ditto. You posted something and I felt like pointing something out about it.

 

You think the tweeter was bad at fractions, while I think you're misreading what he's saying to make a nit picky comment that's irrelevant to the point of the tweet.

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32 minutes ago, RedDenver said:

Ditto. You posted something and I felt like pointing something out about it.

 

You think the tweeter was bad at fractions, while I think you're misreading what he's saying to make a nit picky comment that's irrelevant to the point of the tweet.

 

 

You're the one who pointed out I was being nitpicky and then again asked why I bothered posting. I never said anything of the sort to you. All I asked was why you cared if I was being nitpicky and then harassed me about it. Again, I was talking about some random person on Twitter who will never see what I post. You're complaining directly about me. I wasn't even complaining about the post, just stating something about it. "Ditto" doesn't apply here.

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4 minutes ago, Archy1221 said:

:dunno

 

Walsh is gaslighting you. What an absolutely terrible example for this discussion.


Wife of slain police officer taking legal action

 

"Why was Officer Jarrott asked to pull over someone who federal agents knew had semi-automatic weapons with no backup?" asked Sam Bregman, the attorney for Jarrott's widow and family. "Homeland Security agents showed up within 30 seconds after this horrific shooting wearing tactical gear. They knew exactly the person they were dealing with. Officer Jarrott didn't and they never told him," Bregman said.

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4 minutes ago, knapplc said:

 

Walsh is gaslighting you. What an absolutely terrible example for this discussion.


Wife of slain police officer taking legal action

 

"Why was Officer Jarrott asked to pull over someone who federal agents knew had semi-automatic weapons with no backup?" asked Sam Bregman, the attorney for Jarrott's widow and family. "Homeland Security agents showed up within 30 seconds after this horrific shooting wearing tactical gear. They knew exactly the person they were dealing with. Officer Jarrott didn't and they never told him," Bregman said.

He’s not and it’s a real life example.  Keep trying not to see it as others here would say. 

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