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1 hour ago, knapplc said:

 

This isn't supported by anything other than your opinion.

 

Pruning trees of dead branches causes new branches to grow. This is the way of the world, and has been since neanderthals crawled out of the primordial soup to create calzones.

 

What you're questioning is who chooses what to prune. That pruning is considered benevolent guidance or outrageous overstep depending on who's doing the pruning and what's being pruned.

 

The question you're asking is as important as the pruning. And while I think pruning is at times a necessary step, I think ***at all times*** your question is not just necessary, but vital.

 

 

 

Good toast

 

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Evergreen.  

Now, I've never heard of the Babylon Bee, and I don't think they need to be censored, but I am entertained by the pearl-clutching from the right wingers on this.   For the past four years, y

This is one of the stupidest things you have said on this board, which is no small feat.

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1 hour ago, chamrocck said:

Ask yourself this...if the story was about Trump's son would tech and other media have censored it?  If you answered yes, I have a bridge to sell you.  

 

Is there a history of corruption in Trump and his families' business ventures?

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15 minutes ago, Cdog923 said:

 

Is there a history of corruption in Trump and his families' business ventures?

If there is, sure bring me and the public the emails and photos.  I have no partisan bone to pick.  

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6 hours ago, Cdog923 said:

 

Private companies like Twitter and Facebook are fully within their rights to dictate what is and isn't allowed to be posted to their websites. Is this news to you?

Under current law, but that could/will change. 

 

5 hours ago, JJ Husker said:

 

I agree that corporations making these decisions is not ideal. As we've seen they aren't perfect or blameless. Don't forget, it has been their services responsible for the dissemination of the majority of the disinformation we are concerned about.

 

I'm curious, what other solutions do you suggest that would not involve social media being proactive in preventing people from spreading lies, falsehoods and disinformation through their services?

 

And I'm sorry but I disagree about calling this censorship, at least the type that carries a negative connotation. IMO this is not in the same realm as book burning. If they don't stop it or prevent it, who can or will? I don't think allowing it to flourish and continue is a viable option.

 

George Orwell warned us about this.

 

We're already seeing the Trump administration's version of the  Ministry of Truth. If there is anyone I trust less than corporations, it would be our government.

 

So how do we fix it?

1 what are you talking about?  The media is 99% liberal and will publish anything anti-Trump and he can do nothing about it. 

 

2 You make the Tech companies liable for discrimination against political opinions.  And it won't cost the taxpayers a dime because the ambulance chasers will become censorship chasers overnight. 

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5 hours ago, chamrocck said:

Ask yourself this...if the story was about Trump's son would tech and other media have censored it?  If you answered yes, I have a bridge to sell you.  

Ask yourself this, has any major story about the Trumps been proven false? Has any story attacked the kids for substance abuse or other very personal problems? Has any story come from people in their opposition's campaign who continually push disproven conspiracies?

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4 hours ago, chamrocck said:

If there is, sure bring me and the public the emails and photos.  I have no partisan bone to pick.  

Dude, go look. They're EVERYWHERE. It's more than documented that they are corrupt frauds. Charities have been shutdown, lawsuites won over their fake University, shady timing of Ivanka's Chinese patents, Trump using bankruptcy not to pay contractors, Multiple people are now felons because of his campaign, the kids who work for the Whitehouse using personal email servers just like Hillary. It goes on and on and on.

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12 hours ago, JJ Husker said:

 

I agree that corporations making these decisions is not ideal. As we've seen they aren't perfect or blameless. Don't forget, it has been their services responsible for the dissemination of the majority of the disinformation we are concerned about.

 

I'm curious, what other solutions do you suggest that would not involve social media being proactive in preventing people from spreading lies, falsehoods and disinformation through their services?

I'd start by having Twitter, Facebook, etc. flag content that has factually untrue material and show content that has the facts or refutes the false content. The way to overcome disinformation is with correct information. It'll never be 100% effective, but it's far better than doing nothing and IMO is much less ripe for abuse than censorship.

 

Another tactic is to demonetize or otherwise remove the financial incentive of disinformation. YouTube has been doing this to mixed response thus far. This isn't censorship in that it does not prevent the information from getting out, but it does remove the incentive for sources to lie in order to make money.

 

A lot of the issue with disinformation is not just that it exists, but that it's being pushed by coordinated efforts. A way to combat this is to take a hard stance against bots and people having multiple accounts on sites like Twitter and Facebook. It's not an easy problem to solve but suspending or banning people (or IP addresses) when bots or multiple accounts are detected is another deterrent.

 

12 hours ago, JJ Husker said:

And I'm sorry but I disagree about calling this censorship, at least the type that carries a negative connotation. IMO this is not in the same realm as book burning. If they don't stop it or prevent it, who can or will? I don't think allowing it to flourish and continue is a viable option.

It's not at all in the same realm as book burning, but it is censorship whether you like the connotations or not. And to be clear, I'm not saying all censorship is bad. For example, exceptions to the 1st Amendment like yelling "fire" in a crowded place or inciting violence are not protected speech and can be censored by the government.

 

11 hours ago, knapplc said:

This isn't supported by anything other than your opinion.

As in many things that are complex interactions among people, there's no way to prove that my view is better in all cases. But also means that you can't prove that censorship will be better in all case either. It's a gray area that requires debate and consideration.

 

But it's not just me that has that opinion:

https://reason.com/2019/05/13/fake-news-is-a-really-dangerous-excuse-for-censorship/

 

 

Look into the Streissand Effect for why censorship can be counter-productive. For example, the current NY Post nonsense was barely a story until Twitter banned links to it.

 

Here's a good deep dive into the current state of disinformation by the conservative Brookings Institute including a bunch of ways to deal with disinformation:

https://www.brookings.edu/research/how-to-combat-fake-news-and-disinformation/

 

11 hours ago, knapplc said:

Pruning trees of dead branches causes new branches to grow. This is the way of the world, and has been since neanderthals crawled out of the primordial soup to create calzones.

 

What you're questioning is who chooses what to prune. That pruning is considered benevolent guidance or outrageous overstep depending on who's doing the pruning and what's being pruned.

 

The question you're asking is as important as the pruning. And while I think pruning is at times a necessary step, I think ***at all times*** your question is not just necessary, but vital.

I agree. "Who watches the watchers" is perhaps the most important aspect of any system with checks and balances.

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1 hour ago, RedDenver said:

As in many things that are complex interactions among people, there's no way to prove that my view is better in all cases. But also means that you can't prove that censorship will be better in all case either. It's a gray area that requires debate and consideration.

 

It doesn't have to be better in all cases to be useful. It has to be useful in the right circumstance to be useful.

 

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1 minute ago, knapplc said:

It doesn't have to be better in all cases to be useful. It has to be useful in the right circumstance to be useful.

I agree. Plus it has to be not worse in other circumstances than it's benefits in the right circumstances.

 

For example, imagine Koch or Adelson got control of Twitter and made the decisions on what's censored as "disinformation" and what isn't, then does that make things better or worse? Now consider one of those people got control of Twitter but there was no selective censorship.

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1 hour ago, RedDenver said:

I'd start by having Twitter, Facebook, etc. flag content that has factually untrue material and show content that has the facts or refutes the false content. The way to overcome disinformation is with correct information. It'll never be 100% effective, but it's far better than doing nothing and IMO is much less ripe for abuse than censorship.

 

Another tactic is to demonetize or otherwise remove the financial incentive of disinformation. YouTube has been doing this to mixed response thus far. This isn't censorship in that it does not prevent the information from getting out, but it does remove the incentive for sources to lie in order to make money.

 

A lot of the issue with disinformation is not just that it exists, but that it's being pushed by coordinated efforts. A way to combat this is to take a hard stance against bots and people having multiple accounts on sites like Twitter and Facebook. It's not an easy problem to solve but suspending or banning people (or IP addresses) when bots or multiple accounts are detected is another deterrent.

 

It's not at all in the same realm as book burning, but it is censorship whether you like the connotations or not. And to be clear, I'm not saying all censorship is bad. For example, exceptions to the 1st Amendment like yelling "fire" in a crowded place or inciting violence are not protected speech and can be censored by the government.

 

As in many things that are complex interactions among people, there's no way to prove that my view is better in all cases. But also means that you can't prove that censorship will be better in all case either. It's a gray area that requires debate and consideration.

 

But it's not just me that has that opinion:

https://reason.com/2019/05/13/fake-news-is-a-really-dangerous-excuse-for-censorship/

 

 

Look into the Streissand Effect for why censorship can be counter-productive. For example, the current NY Post nonsense was barely a story until Twitter banned links to it.

 

Here's a good deep dive into the current state of disinformation by the conservative Brookings Institute including a bunch of ways to deal with disinformation:

https://www.brookings.edu/research/how-to-combat-fake-news-and-disinformation/

 

I agree. "Who watches the watchers" is perhaps the most important aspect of any system with checks and balances.


Very good and thoughtful post :thumbs

 

Please don’t get me wrong, I am not enamored with the idea of any entity determining what is suitable and what isn’t (censorship). And I am even less trusting of leaving it up to a company like Facebook to make that determination. But considering what has been happening on social media for the last 10+ years, I am happy somebody is beginning to think about it and do something about it. IMO it is a serious enough problem that, for the time being, I am willing to accept this form of censorship. It is a slippery slope for sure and is not the best solution but it is something....a beginning.

 

I like the idea of real time fact checking and tagging with factual information, I’m just not sure how feasible that really is. And that still leaves the door open for these companies to be the ones determining what is factual and what isn’t.

 

Also I definitely agree that they need to be much more proactive in culling out and banning bots, hate groups, sites that generate and proliferate disinformation, suspect multiple accounts, etc. It is a huge problem that is negatively affecting our society and huge swaths of our citizenry.

 

I still feel the best solution is getting society back to a point where a clear majority are able to recognize bullsh#t and identify the truth. That will more easily allow us to marginalize and ignore the batsh#t crazies in our midst. However, getting there will be dependent upon our government and politicians relearning how to get along and actually govern instead of obstructing the “other” party and we’ll have to quit demonizing opposing points of view. I’m just not convinced we can make it back to that point as all these issues are a vicious cycle, feeding off each other.

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29 minutes ago, RedDenver said:

I agree. Plus it has to be not worse in other circumstances than it's benefits in the right circumstances.

 

For example, imagine Koch or Adelson got control of Twitter and made the decisions on what's censored as "disinformation" and what isn't, then does that make things better or worse? Now consider one of those people got control of Twitter but there was no selective censorship.

 

To the bold, definitely.

 

But don't all businesses do that already? Even HuskerBoard - you can't post every thought here. You can get kicked out of a convenience store for wearing a "f#&% the police" t-shirt. Every business has the right to refuse service.

 

We talked about this a while ago with Landlord. He was kind of saying that these big tech platforms need to be viewed differently. I had made the argument above, and that they have the right to refuse service, and his counter was basically these things are THE public platform now, and the same rules as a convenience store don't apply (sorry for really paraphrasing that LL).

 

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5 hours ago, RedDenver said:

I'd start by having Twitter, Facebook, etc. flag content that has factually untrue material and show content that has the facts or refutes the false content. The way to overcome disinformation is with correct information. It'll never be 100% effective, but it's far better than doing nothing and IMO is much less ripe for abuse than censorship.

I stop right here. If you want the overlords to take care of you and decide what's true then you don't really believe in free speech at all.

 

2 hours ago, knapplc said:

 

To the bold, definitely.

 

But don't all businesses do that already? Even HuskerBoard - you can't post every thought here. You can get kicked out of a convenience store for wearing a "f#&% the police" t-shirt. Every business has the right to refuse service.

 

We talked about this a while ago with Landlord. He was kind of saying that these big tech platforms need to be viewed differently. I had made the argument above, and that they have the right to refuse service, and his counter was basically these things are THE public platform now, and the same rules as a convenience store don't apply (sorry for really paraphrasing that LL).

 

 

If the convenience store was so powerful that there was really only a couple of others like it in the entire country, then the country reigns in their ability to censor your shirt. 

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3 hours ago, knapplc said:

To the bold, definitely.

 

But don't all businesses do that already? Even HuskerBoard - you can't post every thought here. You can get kicked out of a convenience store for wearing a "f#&% the police" t-shirt. Every business has the right to refuse service.

 

We talked about this a while ago with Landlord. He was kind of saying that these big tech platforms need to be viewed differently. I had made the argument above, and that they have the right to refuse service, and his counter was basically these things are THE public platform now, and the same rules as a convenience store don't apply (sorry for really paraphrasing that LL).

Again, companies have the RIGHT to censor. I'm talking about whether they SHOULD censor. If their goal is to combat disinformation, then I think censorship is the wrong tool and is ultimately counter productive.

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12 minutes ago, Notre Dame Joe said:

I stop right here. If you want the overlords to take care of you and decide what's true then you don't really believe in free speech at all.

 

 

If the convenience store was so powerful that there was really only a couple of others like it in the entire country, then the country reigns in their ability to censor your shirt. 

The two parts of your post perfectly contradict each other because of the ambiguousness of "overlords".

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