Jump to content
knapplc

The cooking tips & tricks thread

Recommended Posts

This post got me to thinking that there may be things I do that would be helpful to you guys, and I figured there should be a thread to share tips like this. Also, if you guys have any good ideas I'll learn something, which is the real me-first reason I started this thread. :D

 

If you don't have kitchen twine or don't want to tie the legs, cut a 1" slit in the flappy skin on one side of the cavity, near the tail (or where the tail would be). Stick the "knuckle" of the leg on the opposite side of your cut through the slit, then cross the other leg under the first. Pressure from the second leg pushing on the first should keep them together, and the skin is tough enough that it *usually* won't rip. If it rips, cut a slit on the opposite side and try again.

 

You can also tuck the wings back and behind the back of the bird, although describing how to do that is a bit wonky. I don't think about it, I just do it.

 

The best thing about doing it this way is that you don't get your twine roll full of chicken bacteria, or if you've cut your twine ahead of time, you're not guessing how much you need and having waste or finding out you have too little.

 

A few other things I do that makes things better/easier...

 

Making Stock

 

Save your bones, save your vegetable peels. Ever use chicken, beef, pork, vegetable or fish stock when you cook? If you buy it, you're cheating yourself. You can make excellent stock from the stuff you typically throw away.

 

Vegetable peels are gold and should be treated as such. Root vegetables such as onions, garlic, carrots, celery and potatoes are something you're usually going to be cooking with, and you're going to have waste. Onion ends/skin, that knobby bit on the bottom of the carrot, your garlic paper and tips/ends, typically you're going to throw that all away, or compost it.

 

Instead, rinse them all clean (I use a colander) and toss them in a gallon freezer bag. A gallon freezer bag full of this waste will make approximately two gallons of vegetable stock, depending on the strength you prefer.

 

Got chicken bones, like from a roast chicken? Or beef bones, pork bones from a shoulder, stuff like that? Don't throw them away, freeze them. When you have a bunch, put them in a pot with a few handsful of your veggie peels, boil them for about ten minutes and then simmer for an hour or so, and you've got great, free stock. Same goes for shrimp shells (fresh - not cooked in a broth or any dish). Freeze your shrimp shells, throw in some veggie peels, and you've got fantastic fish stock.

 

Your butcher, or even the butcher at your local grocery store, should have beef bones in the back, and often they're just thrown away. My grocery store butcher sells me giant marrow bones for $1 a pound - less if I show him a bit of leg. I have him cut those into 10" sections. I give them a slight dousing of olive oil, then roast them in the oven at 350 for an hour or two with root vegetables (but not peels). Once out of the oven they go into my ginormous pot and simmer for a while. What comes out is beefy magic, and serves as the base for many of my recipes. I use it in a lot of recipes, and since it's the real deal good stuff, you can render it down to demi glace if you want - and sometimes you do want.

 

I do the same with chicken bones, although the chicken bones I use are typically leftovers from deli roasted chickens that I've pulled the meat off of (discard the skin - if they spice their chicken, you don't want their spices in your broth).

 

If you're a composter, you can toss your used veggie scraps on the compost heap after you've made your broth.

 

This is the biggest no-brainer idea I've ever had. I felt like an idiot (not a genius) when I first thought of doing this because why hadn't I been doing this for years?

 

EDIT - here's Anthony Bourdain's beef stock recipe. It's basically what I do.

 

 

Storing stuff

 

I freeze most everything I make, including broth, stock, pesto, various sauces/ragu, etc. I have plenty of freezer space, but it gets filled up fast if I don't organize it properly.

 

The best way I've found is to fill my quart or gallon freezer bags full, squinch out all the air, then lay it flat to freeze. I have some boxes that exactly fit both quart and gallon freezer bags, which helps them not flop around as they're freezing.

 

Once frozen I take them out of the boxes and stand them upright in the freezer, usually set into short-walled boxes (like the flats you get at Sam's Club). Standing them upright saves space, and freezing things flat makes thawing more uniform and things thaw far quicker than if it's a big lump.

 

 

The easiest way to fill quart freezer bags is to stuff them in a quart drinks cup , then drape the closey end over the sides of the cup. I'll use a drinking glass to stuff it down in properly, then pour/ladle whatever I'm storing in, pull it out, get the air out on the counter, and lay it flat. If you have a gallon pitcher you can do the same thing with your larger batches.

 

LABEL EVERYTHING. I still have this problem, and I kick myself every time if I grab an unlabeled bag and can't figure out if it's chicken or veggie broth, or a specific kind of pesto or even what meat it is. Frozen foods look different than thawed. Label, label, label.

 

 

 

 

This took a little longer to type up than I thought, so that's it for now. I'll add some more stuff as I think of it.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buy the best chef's knife that you can afford. You're better off (in my experience) buying a higher end chef's knife and settling for lower quality on your other knives than buying a middle of the road complete set.

 

Potato ricers. Worth the money.

 

Regular olive oil for cooking, extra virgin olive oil for dipping/dressing.

 

Trader Joe's is a great place for stocking up on less common staples like cheap and high quality arborio rice and canned plum tomatoes but it generally isn't a great place to buy produce. (Also, HyVee probably has the worst quality produce that I've seen of the major chains in Omaha and Lincoln.)

 

If you (or a family member/friend) have a Costco membership, for gods sake buy your cheese and booze there. Excellent cheese selection at prices that can't be beaten at any of the grocery chains. I always have at least a pound of kirkland pecorino romano and kirkland parmesan in the fridge. Grate the former into pasta sauces. Top pretty much anything with the latter.

 

 

 

In a pinch for supper?

 

Cacio e pepe can be prepared from shelf stable staples in less than 15 minutes. http://www.saveur.co...ta-Cacio-e-Pepe

11422_cacio_pepe_pasta_600.jpg

 

 

Hazan's tomato sauce can be prepared in around 45 minutes (only 5 minutes of actual work) from canned tomatoes, butter, and a single onion. http://www.amateurgo...uce-recipe.html

10022656083_4796a3ed9f_o.jpg

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The larger of these two knives is what I mostly use.

 

IJStTc5.jpg

 

 

I have an older version of this set, and I like it, but the larger knife above fits my hand very well.

 

I would agree that getting a good-quality chef's knife is essential to cooking, but I would also say that having a knife that best fits your hand is as important.

 

 

What do you use your potato ricer for? Just mashed potatoes? If so, how often do you use it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What do you use your potato ricer for? Just mashed potatoes? If so, how often do you use it?

Just mashed potatoes. Probably once a month. I'd like to use it more often . . . but the calories.

 

I boil yukon golds with the skin left on and throw 3-4 heads worth of unpeeled garlic in the pot. Run the garlic and the potatoes through the ricer into a milk and butter mixture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Make sure you simmer your steak in milk to get it the perfect "boiled over hard", I can't stress this enough. As well, don't be a dingdong, always garnish with jelly beans.

 

MS_reduce_heat_878.JPG

 

Milk steak goes great with Delaware River crabs.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My tip? Brine that poultry.

 

If you want to keep that chicken or turkey moist and juicy be sure to brine it, especially if you will be grilling, roasting, or smoking it. You can find all kinds of brine recipe on the web but the important thing is not the herbs/spices/flavoring that can be adjusted and widely varied but rather the ratio of salt and sugar. Don't ever pull a dried out chicken breast off your grill again.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can buy the best knives in the world. But if you don't sharpen them correctly and often, you might as well use a butter knife. I've been cooking professionally for 30+ years now and sharpening is one thing I pound into my Sous chefs heads. You will often see the TV chefs steeling their knives really fast and "showy". That's all for show. Before my cooking career I cut meat at Monforts in Grand Island and that is where I mastered the proper use of sharpening steels.

The most important thing to remember is that when you are running the edge down the steel. The angle of the edge to the steel must be the same on each side. If you view a sharp edge under a microscope the sharpest edges are the ones that are the truest. Think of it this way: When the edge is completely straight down the entire length of the blade it will be the sharpest. When that micro edge starts to curl to the left or right that is when dulling appears and you have to "properly" steel the edge back to being true once more.

 

I use up to 4 steels depending on what I need to get out of the edge. There are diamond steels, smooth, coarse, ceramic etc. etc. If you tap your blade on metal or just nick it (even a little) it's time to steel.

 

One more tip: If you have one of those magnetic knife holders on your kitchen wall to keep your knives out of the drawer. It's a nice idea, but throw that mother away as far as you can. Any kind of magnetization will "curl" your beautiful sharp edge everytime.

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a knife that you made totally by hand. It is very rewarding to use something you've made. :)

Those are beautiful. What'd you use for the steel? I've tried my hand at making knives from really old saw blades . . . but that sort of artistry/detail work isn't really my strong suit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a knife that you made totally by hand. It is very rewarding to use something you've made. :)

Those are beautiful. What'd you use for the steel? I've tried my hand at making knives from really old saw blades . . . but that sort of artistry/detail work isn't really my strong suit.

 

Thanks man! I used 1084, it's not the best for kitchen knives because it's not stainless, but if you keep good care of it it's fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can buy the best knives in the world. But if you don't sharpen them correctly and often, you might as well use a butter knife. I've been cooking professionally for 30+ years now and sharpening is one thing I pound into my Sous chefs heads. You will often see the TV chefs steeling their knives really fast and "showy". That's all for show. Before my cooking career I cut meat at Monforts in Grand Island and that is where I mastered the proper use of sharpening steels.

The most important thing to remember is that when you are running the edge down the steel. The angle of the edge to the steel must be the same on each side. If you view a sharp edge under a microscope the sharpest edges are the ones that are the truest. Think of it this way: When the edge is completely straight down the entire length of the blade it will be the sharpest. When that micro edge starts to curl to the left or right that is when dulling appears and you have to "properly" steel the edge back to being true once more.

 

I use up to 4 steels depending on what I need to get out of the edge. There are diamond steels, smooth, coarse, ceramic etc. etc. If you tap your blade on metal or just nick it (even a little) it's time to steel.

 

One more tip: If you have one of those magnetic knife holders on your kitchen wall to keep your knives out of the drawer. It's a nice idea, but throw that mother away as far as you can. Any kind of magnetization will "curl" your beautiful sharp edge everytime.

 

Do you have someone sharpen your knives or do you do it yourself (as in, not truing the edge on your steel but actual grinding)? If you do it yourself, what do you use?

 

 

 

 

 

@TheRedCarver - that's a beautiful knife. Nice work!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can buy the best knives in the world. But if you don't sharpen them correctly and often, you might as well use a butter knife. I've been cooking professionally for 30+ years now and sharpening is one thing I pound into my Sous chefs heads. You will often see the TV chefs steeling their knives really fast and "showy". That's all for show. Before my cooking career I cut meat at Monforts in Grand Island and that is where I mastered the proper use of sharpening steels.

The most important thing to remember is that when you are running the edge down the steel. The angle of the edge to the steel must be the same on each side. If you view a sharp edge under a microscope the sharpest edges are the ones that are the truest. Think of it this way: When the edge is completely straight down the entire length of the blade it will be the sharpest. When that micro edge starts to curl to the left or right that is when dulling appears and you have to "properly" steel the edge back to being true once more.

 

I use up to 4 steels depending on what I need to get out of the edge. There are diamond steels, smooth, coarse, ceramic etc. etc. If you tap your blade on metal or just nick it (even a little) it's time to steel.

 

One more tip: If you have one of those magnetic knife holders on your kitchen wall to keep your knives out of the drawer. It's a nice idea, but throw that mother away as far as you can. Any kind of magnetization will "curl" your beautiful sharp edge everytime.

 

This is probably the one area where I honestly need the most help in the kitchen. I have no idea really how to sharpen my knives. I'm interested in hearing what others use to really do a good job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I get a pretty decent edge on my knives using the sharpener on the back of my can opener. Sounds silly, but it works. I hone that on my sharpening steel and I have some pretty wickedly sharp knives.

 

Only problem is, that's a small stone and it's getting pretty worn. I need a new sharpening stone. Anyone have any recommendations?

 

 

 

Also, how do you guys check the sharpness of your knife? I've always drawn the blade across my thumbnail, perpendicular to my finger. If it catches or snags, it needs more sharpening. If it glides across and makes a neat, sharp furrow, you're good. Picked that up when I worked in a smoke house in my early 20s and I've done it ever since.

 

First time my wife saw me doing that she about freaked out. Thought I was going to cut my thumb off. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knapp, I use different brands of knives ( Wusthof, Henckels and Forschner ) and one of the first things I do is contact the manufacturer. I get the hardness of the stainless used and the beginning grind angle on the edges. Depending on the blade thickness I can either taper the edge more or less.

I always use a 3 way stone to maintain the angle of the edge. I never take knives to be sharpened by someone else. Too many people will just hollow grind an edge because it's easier for a novice to keep an edge on the knife. Once you get to know your knives and their characteristics the hand stones are the best way to maintain them.

 

Carver those are some beautiful knives!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Three-way stone sharpener, as in, it has three different levels of grit/grind? Coarse, medium & fine, I'm guessing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys!

 

I use my belt sander to sharpen. I also have a leather strop to keep the edge sharp. I don't have to do more that a few passes on the strop to keep it sharp for a long time, I don't think I've resharpened it on the belt sander for a few months now.

 

I test my edges using newspaper and phonebook paper, I find it to be the most consistent and it's easy to see if there are any imperfections in the edge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now I'm curious and I've run across this. Lifehacker forums said this is a pretty good product. Anyone have any experience with this kind of sharpener?

 

http://www.amazon.com/Work-Sharp-WSSA0002009-Sharpening-System/dp/B001TV02PW/ref=sr_1_4?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1398347978&sr=1-4&keywords=worksharp+sharpener

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Three-way stone sharpener, as in, it has three different levels of grit/grind? Coarse, medium & fine, I'm guessing?

Yes, If I was saavy enough to post pics I would. They carry them at restaurant supply stores. 3 different levels of coarsness and they rotate on a base filled with oil. I test the sharpness by bending my wrist down and shaving hairs off the area.

Depending on the customer I try not to test the edge over their food! lol :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now I'm curious and I've run across this. Lifehacker forums said this is a pretty good product. Anyone have any experience with this kind of sharpener?

 

http://www.amazon.co...sharp+sharpener

I've never used one configured like that. But from looking at it, the sharpener dictates the edge of the grind. I like to keep the edge that's best for the hardness of the steel and the manufacturers specs.

I like to keep the angle of my edges between 24 and 32 degrees. I have a couple of Henckels that steel better at a 20 degree angle though.

 

Once again it boils down to knife characteristics and if you're steeling at the same angle on each side.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aparently there are some aristocrats out there that can't appreciate a good milksteak, so I'll throw out a couple other suggestions.

 

Everybody should own a rice cooker, it will cook your rice perfect and is easy as boiling water. Also, the only rice a person should ever eat is Jasmine and Basmatti, if you eat Uncle Bens rice are any of that parboiled crap take a lap.

 

Also, a hefty amount of Sriracha should be applied to every food no matter what it is. The greatest dipping sauce in the world is equal parts mayo and Sriracha, if you dip pizza in this you will see the world in a different light.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone still adding oil to your pasta water so it doesn't stick? Dont it's an old wives tale. The only thing to do to the water is to salt it until it tastes like the sea and stir intermittently. I had this slapped into my head by 3 Italian chefs that I apprenticed with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone still adding oil to your pasta water so it doesn't stick? Dont it's an old wives tale. The only thing to do to the water is to salt it until it tastes like the sea and stir intermittently. I had this slapped into my head by 3 Italian chefs that I apprenticed with.

Yep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MAKE EVERY PASTA DISH BETTER WITH BECHAMEL SAUCE.

 

how to make:

 

In a medium size pot, melt a stick of butter or so on medium heat.

 

Add a half cup or whatever of flour.

 

Stir and beat that sh#t like you're mad at it.

 

Add a pint of half and half.

 

Stir again and ask yourself "What the f#*k NUPolo8? This is runny and nasty and I don't know what we are do--oh holy crap it just instantly got thick and smells awesome"

 

Dump a tub of ricotta cheese in and stir until you are as angry as I am.

 

Apply to bold flavors.

 

Drink IPA's with your meal.

 

Make a note to work out tomorrow.

 

Window into NUpolo8's world complete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Aparently there are some aristocrats out there that can't appreciate a good milksteak, so I'll throw out a couple other suggestions.

 

Everybody should own a rice cooker, it will cook your rice perfect and is easy as boiling water. Also, the only rice a person should ever eat is Jasmine and Basmatti, if you eat Uncle Bens rice are any of that parboiled crap take a lap.

 

Also, a hefty amount of Sriracha should be applied to every food no matter what it is. The greatest dipping sauce in the world is equal parts mayo and Sriracha, if you dip pizza in this you will see the world in a different light.

 

You will eat Calrose rice or you will die in a fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MAKE EVERY PASTA DISH BETTER WITH BECHAMEL SAUCE.

 

how to make:

 

In a medium size pot, melt a stick of butter or so on medium heat.

 

Add a half cup or whatever of flour.

 

Stir and beat that sh#t like you're mad at it.

 

Add a pint of half and half.

 

Stir again and ask yourself "What the f#*k NUPolo8? This is runny and nasty and I don't know what we are do--oh holy crap it just instantly got thick and smells awesome"

 

Dump a tub of ricotta cheese in and stir until you are as angry as I am.

 

Apply to bold flavors.

 

Drink IPA's with your meal.

 

Make a note to work out tomorrow.

 

Window into NUpolo8's world complete.

 

 

Almost done. Sautee a few tiny diced onion in the butter first. Add a little nutmeg ( not much ) black pepper. All white sauces need either white or black pepper.

Omit the ricotta for grated Parmesan and voila' Alfredo sauce.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

MAKE EVERY PASTA DISH BETTER WITH BECHAMEL SAUCE.

 

how to make:

 

In a medium size pot, melt a stick of butter or so on medium heat.

 

Add a half cup or whatever of flour.

 

Stir and beat that sh#t like you're mad at it.

 

Add a pint of half and half.

 

Stir again and ask yourself "What the f#*k NUPolo8? This is runny and nasty and I don't know what we are do--oh holy crap it just instantly got thick and smells awesome"

 

Dump a tub of ricotta cheese in and stir until you are as angry as I am.

 

Apply to bold flavors.

 

Drink IPA's with your meal.

 

Make a note to work out tomorrow.

 

Window into NUpolo8's world complete.

 

Almost done. Sautee a few tiny diced onion in the butter first. Add a little nutmeg ( not much ) black pepper. All white sauces need either white or black pepper.

Omit the ricotta for grated Parmesan and voila' Alfredo sauce.

 

 

Sounds great, but if I may...

 

Replace the Parm with some smoked Gruyere, pour over open faced turkey sammich, lightly toast under broiler. Add fried egg if desired.

 

Best brunch ever (besides Eggs Benedict).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Butchering a Whole Chicken

There are tons of ways to cut up a whole chicken. You can end up with your standard eight parts (2 wings, 2 breasts, 2 thighs & 2 legs) or you can mix and match pieces and sizes. These parts of the chicken cook differently, and you'll want to gauge your cuts to how you're going to cook your chicken.

There are 200 websites out there describing how to butcher a chicken so I'm not going to get into too much detail here. It's pretty easy and gets easier with practice.

 

Choose a knife that best fits your hand, but will also let you get into the joints with precision. By that I mean, don't use a giant 10" butcher knife, but don't use a paring knife, either. A medium sized, sharp knife that you can manipulate easily and precisely is what you want.

 

I cut the thigh/leg quarters off first by slicing the fatty skin between the thigh & breast until I can just about lay the thigh/leg down flat on the board. From there I find the joint, stick the point of my knife in the joint & twist to separate. Sever the rest, then I pinch the back side of the leg/thigh (where the kneecap would be if it were a human leg) to find the joint. Another small cut into that skin shows where the joint is, then the end of the knife goes in that, twist to separate, and finish by cutting it as evenly as possible.

 

Next I remove the wings by twisting the wing to find the joint, then again with the tip of the knife into the joint to separate, but I tend to cut a knob of meat out of the lower breast to go onto the wing "drumstick" so it has some bite to it. Kinda like the first picture below, but a bit more meat.

 

To separate the breast I turn the carcass so the neck cavity faces me, then I draw my knife straight down the middle of the breastbone. From there I go down the bone with the blade in successive cuts, peeling away the breast as I go. You have to be careful not to get any of the thin rib bones at the bottom, but it's pretty self-explanatory. Just slice & pull.

 

 

Your basic cut-up chicken looks like this:

H7zPfrA.jpg

You've got your two legs, thighs, breasts & wings, and you've got your back and the back skin. This person pulled the tenderloin off the inside of the breast, and I do that when I'm frying chicken because it's a pretty handy size of white meat for kiddos, basically just a natural Chicken Finger. This person left the nibs on the ends of the wings, but nobody eats those, so I cut them off. The leg quarters are whole here, but I never leave them whole because they're pretty much a pain to eat that way, and grilling whole quarters isn't any easier than separating the two.

 

Every part of this chicken is useful, and you should throw none of it away. Your breasts, legs, thighs & wings are good eating, obviously, but the back, skin & wing nibs are gold for broth & stock. I talked about this in the first post in this thread, and this is where the bulk of your chicken bits for broth come from. That's all flavor - don't waste flavor. In the website I got this pic from, the lady describes salting & frying the back skin as a treat, and you can do that if you want, but if you're just using the back for stock then don't bother peeling the skin off.

 


 

One thing to note - you should treat raw chicken like having poison in your kitchen. DO NOT WASH RAW CHICKEN. In a conventional home kitchen there isn't enough separation between cooking areas & your sink to avoid overspray/splashing. Washing chicken splashes bacteria all over the place, and unless you're willing to wash your sink & about a two-foot radius around it with bleach every time you wash a chicken, it's not worth the contamination risk. Any bacteria on the chicken will die if cooked properly, so rather than washing your raw chicken, focus on proper cooking.

 

Speaking of contamination - you should always use different cutting boards for vegetables and meats. I have eight cutting boards at home, four for vegetables and four for meat. I differentiate between them by scorching the corner of the meat boards with flame. It's not pretty, I guess, but I'm not in my kitchen to look pretty, I'm there to make good food as safely as possible.

 

I get them at Sam's Club, and they're less than $10 apiece.

 

LINK

 

They're big enough to butcher a turkey, or to chop piles of vegetables at a time. Cutting boards are essential, cheap, and super-handy.

 


 

 

 

 

 

Below is a picture of pretty much how I cut up chicken for frying, with the two legs on the left, the breast cut into four pieces next to that (the tenderloins are still on these breast pieces - you can see them at the bottom), the wings with the nibs removed, and the thighs on the bottom right. Those are all reasonably similar-sized pieces, so you won't have too much of a disparity in frying time there.

IAI7Syk.jpg

 

If you look at the sheer volume of that breast, and think about trying to fry that whole, you can imagine it'll take about twice as long as any other piece. The longer your chicken stays in that grease the more likely it is to get that nasty burnt-grease flavor, so cut it in half and speed up the process.

 

 

 

Speaking of Chicken Fingers, I make my own out of store-bought whole chicken breasts. I remove the skin (which is saved for broth), then just rip them into uneven, kinda ragged pieces of similar sizes. The breast rips apart pretty easily if you stick your thumb through the meat, and the ragged (as in, not precisely cut into strips) looks better than utilitarian straight-cut pieces.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good post knapp. I used to watch my mom and grandma butcher chickens when I was young. The only part of the process I took part in was lopping the heads off and defeathering them after dipping the carcass in boiling water. It's an interesting process start to finish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate to be a one trick pony in this thread but I just had a whole new world opened up to me tonight. Pork chops on the grill? BRINE THEM FIRST. Holy crap, best chops ever EVAR.

 

The brine-

4 cups water

1/4 cup kosher salt

1/4 cup brown sugar

Whatever seasoning/spices you like on your pork (I used Jim Baldridge seasoning-a North Platte product)

Disolve salt and sugar in the water, add seasonings, pour over pork chops in a ziplock bag, and put in fridge for 4-8 hours. May want to double bag or put it in a bowl in case it leaks.

Remove from brine, rinse, and pat dry.

Grill like normal.

+1 this post when you experience a whole new grilled pork chop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hate to be a one trick pony in this thread but I just had a whole new world opened up to me tonight. Pork chops on the grill? BRINE THEM FIRST. Holy crap, best chops ever EVAR.

 

The brine-

4 cups water

1/4 cup kosher salt

1/4 cup brown sugar

Whatever seasoning/spices you like on your pork (I used Jim Baldridge seasoning-a North Platte product)

Disolve salt and sugar in the water, add seasonings, pour over pork chops in a ziplock bag, and put in fridge for 4-8 hours. May want to double bag or put it in a bowl in case it leaks.

Remove from brine, rinse, and pat dry.

 

I do this with chicken as well. Turns out really good and moist.

Grill like normal.

+1 this post when you experience a whole new grilled pork chop.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knapp, butchering a chicken is a lost art that I have watched my mother do probably a thousand times. Her family used to raise chickens and supply them to the Hastings hospital already butchered. (Many many many years ago). I have never seen anyone be able to do it as fast as she could. She would leave the tenderloins on the back though. That was one of my favorite pieces of fried chicken.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chicken butchering horror story - I was frying chicken for Father's Day, and in the middle of butchering Chicken #2, some cord-thing fell out as I was removing the breast. I chopped the breast into three pieces (easier frying) and put them in the bowl before paying any attention to this thing. I figured it was butcher paper or whatever that bag is they put the giblets in. Turns out that cord-thing was the tenderloin, so rotted & dessicated it was barely recognizable as meat.

 

I had already put 3/4 of that chicken into the bowl with the other cut-up chicken, meaning if there was any contamination, the other chicken was contaminated now, too. So I pitched two whole chickens & carcasses and had to scurry back to the store to get parts & pieces to fry up for dinner.

 

I scalded the hell out of my hands washing that crap off me, then I went over that butcher board, counter top & sink three times before I was satisfied that I'd cleaned it all properly. I was an unhappy camper.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×