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Best way to lose weight for over 55 year olds

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Everyone, I'd like to lose 30 - 40 lbs (I'm at 218 now) and am 5'10.5" & I'm 59 years old. I've never been much of a weight lifter even in my HS days when I played 4 different sports. But I hear that doing a lot of weight reps very fast is the best way to lose fat and pounds - better than the aerobic exercises.

What would you guys say (the guys who know a thing or 2 about training) suggest as a sample workout routine. I belong to a Planet Fitness gym here in town so they have the machines and the free weights but no pool.

 

Thanks for the tips.

 

PS- also - have any of you found a way to be accountable to someone else that works - to keep you motivated and pursuing your goal?

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I think the idea there is to have some intensity for the post-workout afterburn...seems to me like more of a "efficiency" thing per time spent, rather than one being better than the other. Though, why not both? Probably the best cardio to do would be on a stationary bike, to avoid stress on the joints that jogging will do. Walking is good, too, not as a workout program really, just a "big part of your everyday life" thing. All starts with nutrition though. Can't imagine this will do much good without starting with what you eat (and what you don't!)

 

I don't really know much about training though so I'll let the pros answer, mostly ;)

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Actually, I'd focus on your diet first. Most of your results are going to come from eating correctly, not from working out. At least initially. I'm not saying don't work out. What i am saying is that you can't out exercise over eating.

 

I don't really mean you need go all "healthy". You just need to eat the right amount of stuff, day in and day out.

 

If I were you, I'd start using an app like MyFitnessPal or something similar. Tell it you want to lose a pound a week. It will tell you how many calories to consume.

 

Do that, monitor your weight and adjust accordingly. Not losing weight after a few weeks? Move more or ratchet down a few hundred calories. Losing weight too quickly? Eat a bit more. Adjust.

 

As far as a workout routine, I favor simple routines involving barbells. A few movements, squat, deadlift, presses, etc. I don't think they own those at planet fitness. :(

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The simple way to lose weight is burn more calories than you take in. That involves not only a good workout program, but also watching what you eat.

 

For exercise, do what you enjoy doing. For your age, that could be as simple as walking or riding a bike. If you can do some weight-work, focus on high-rep, low rest between sets during your workout.

 

For your "diet", it's good to eat a number of small meals throughout the day. There is nothing wrong with eating when you are hungry. If you want to make a big change, watch what you drink. Avoid sodas and other drinks that are nothing but empty calories. Replace those with water and unsweetened iced tea.

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There is one very hard fast but simple rule to losing weight. More calories burned than consumed.

 

Now, I would strongly suggest getting an app on your phone (there are several really good ones) where you keep track of what you eat and what you do for exercise. This then calculates your calories you burn and consume. After a while, it becomes just a habit and easy to quickly input what you are doing. You can easily learn what to eat and what not to eat and how days where you don't exercise really hurts you in weight loss because you just aren't burning calories.

 

As far as working out, I find doing some weight training and some aerobic exercise is the best. If you can build some muscle, that larger muscle mass burns more calories even while you are sleeping. Change up your workouts. Let's say you are a runner. If that is all you do, your body gets used to the stress and becomes extremely efficient in doing that exercise and you actually burn fewer calories. So, maybe you lift a couple days per week. Maybe you run one or two days. Maybe you bike (at a pace your heart beat is elevated) a day. Maybe you swim or play basketball.

 

The idea is that you don't allow your body to get used to just one movement or exercise. Continually stressing it in different ways will show much bigger gains.

 

Again, burn more than you take in. If you do that, you will lose weight. I believe the medical profession will say that 3,500 calories equals one lb. So, if you burn 6,000 - 7,000 calories more per week than you consume, you should lose a couple lbs per week.

 

The app I told you about will help keep track of that.

 

Good luck.

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One more thing. If you drink soft drinks.....STOP RIGHT NOW!!!!!

 

Even the diet varieties are absolutely some of the worst stuff you can put in your body and it will derail what you are trying to do here.

 

If you do drink it regularly, I challenge you to give it up for 60-90 days. Not one drop. After that, if you try it? It will be some of the grossest stuff you try to drink.

 

You also don't need sports drinks, supplements...etc.

 

Water...Drink more and more water.

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The idea is that you don't allow your body to get used to just one movement or exercise. Continually stressing it in different ways will show much bigger gains.

 

Again, burn more than you take in.

 

BRB is especially correct with these statements. In your age group, you also need to think about joint & bone health. Range of motion with different excercises will help with both of these. If you just do one thing, it's harder to push the body in regards to calorie management.

 

I am 6' and ~6 years ago, I decided to drop ~35 lbs. I have kept almost all of it off since then (~32.5 lbs). I played competive sports until my early 30s and that was when weight became an issue. I was running at least 7 miles per day, weight training at least 3x per week and eating healthy and still got out of balance on calorie intake vs expenditure.

 

It starts & ends with diet for your age group. The healthier you eat, the easier it will be, imo. With the exception of highly processed foods & soda, it's about moderation. Sugar is a killer as with most processed foods. My big issue was fresh fruit. I ate healthy but too much fresh fruit can be like too much soda...

 

One tip I got from a GI Dr & nutrionist that works with a lot of Olympic & pro atheletes is fiber intake. She was religous about males over middle-age needing well over 40g fiber daily. At least 60% from natural food sources (non-processed veggies). This is bare minimum & her general rule over 35+ was 45-50g per day. For myself, I found that staying within this range gave me way more flexibility with the rest of my diet. Her rule for meals was carb to fiber ratio...

 

My recommendation is definitely speak with someone in this space (GI and/or nutrionist) as it will make it much easier to make adjustments to your diet. Losing the wieght only to put it back on again starts a very unhealthy cycle. Best to avioid if you can...

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There is no evidence that "diet" soda is bad for you. None.

 

http://examine.com/faq/is-diet-soda-bad-for-you.html

 

Even the article contradicts your statement.

 

The article states there are "no studies that indicate any long-term health risks". There are plenty of documented & established health risks with diet soda. Faster eroding of tooth enamel & stomach lining are two off the top the of my head... Also off memory, Aspartame has been causally linked to trigger cluster headaches (more debilitating than migraines) and has been established as a trigger for auto-immune disease responses such as pemphigus (if i recall correctly).

 

There is evidence it is bad for you. Is it worse than anything else, such as regular soda? That is TBD...

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Hope these links work. I'm on my phone.

 

 

http://www.health.com/health/m/gallery/0,,20739512,00.html

 

http://www.prevention.com/food/healthy-eating-tips/health-risks-drinking-diet-soda

 

http://www.rodalenews.com/facts-about-soda

 

 

If you can honestly read the ingredients and think it's not bad for you ....well.....

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There is no evidence that "diet" soda is bad for you. None.

 

http://examine.com/faq/is-diet-soda-bad-for-you.html

 

Even the article contradicts your statement.

 

The article states there are "no studies that indicate any long-term health risks". There are plenty of documented & established health risks with diet soda. Faster eroding of tooth enamel & stomach lining are two off the top the of my head... Also off memory, Aspartame has been causally linked to trigger cluster headaches (more debilitating than migraines) and has been established as a trigger for auto-immune disease responses such as pemphigus (if i recall correctly).

 

There is evidence it is bad for you. Is it worse than anything else, such as regular soda? That is TBD...

 

Can you point to some good studies that show that diet soda leads to faster tooth enamel eroding and stomach lining, than, say, coffee or anything else? Ones with control groups, good sample size, etc.

 

Also, would like to see a reputable study on these "headaches". I do know that a very small percentage of the population report headaches, but so did people with MSG and that was proven to just not be the case. They essentially made it up.

 

The OP has much bigger fish to fry then futzing over diet soda.

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Hope these links work. I'm on my phone.

 

 

http://www.health.com/health/m/gallery/0,,20739512,00.html

The study specifed in this list re: diabetes is pretty crappy. It doesn't show causality (i.e. consuming diet soda DOES increase your risk for diabetes). Basically it's saying there maybe a relationship here, or not. We don't really know. Again. A crappy source.

 

Same study, same thing. This is not good enough science to actually show a real problem worth acting on.

http://www.rodalenews.com/facts-about-soda

If you can honestly read the ingredients and think it's not bad for you ....well.....

Just another list, pointing to vague studies about dyes and what not.

 

Listen, I'm not saying to go out and drink 12 of, well, anything except water. What I am saying is that this is NOT the biggest thing the OP, or anyone for that matter, has to worry about.

 

You want a diet soda or two? Fine, have some. It's not going to kill you now, or even in the long run. If you think it's the boogey man and to blame for your problems, fine don't drink it.

 

Just know that science clearly shows that it won't kill you or even do you appreciable harm. Spreading "news" that it will is sort of irresponsible IMO.

 

Stick to sources like Examine.com. They actually analyze these studies, sort the good from the bad and give you the straight dope on the topic.

 

This is a much better approach that reading an abstract, not really understanding the parameters, etc. Then putting together a click-bait article up about "Top X things you didn't know about Y".

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The idea is that you don't allow your body to get used to just one movement or exercise. Continually stressing it in different ways will show much bigger gains.

 

Again, burn more than you take in.

 

BRB is especially correct with these statements. In your age group, you also need to think about joint & bone health. Range of motion with different excercises will help with both of these. If you just do one thing, it's harder to push the body in regards to calorie management.

 

I am 6' and ~6 years ago, I decided to drop ~35 lbs. I have kept almost all of it off since then (~32.5 lbs). I played competive sports until my early 30s and that was when weight became an issue. I was running at least 7 miles per day, weight training at least 3x per week and eating healthy and still got out of balance on calorie intake vs expenditure.

 

It starts & ends with diet for your age group. The healthier you eat, the easier it will be, imo. With the exception of highly processed foods & soda, it's about moderation. Sugar is a killer as with most processed foods. My big issue was fresh fruit. I ate healthy but too much fresh fruit can be like too much soda...

 

One tip I got from a GI Dr & nutrionist that works with a lot of Olympic & pro atheletes is fiber intake. She was religous about males over middle-age needing well over 40g fiber daily. At least 60% from natural food sources (non-processed veggies). This is bare minimum & her general rule over 35+ was 45-50g per day. For myself, I found that staying within this range gave me way more flexibility with the rest of my diet. Her rule for meals was carb to fiber ratio...

 

My recommendation is definitely speak with someone in this space (GI and/or nutrionist) as it will make it much easier to make adjustments to your diet. Losing the wieght only to put it back on again starts a very unhealthy cycle. Best to avioid if you can...

 

Thanks everyone for your input. It is really appreciated. I think you hit on something here ColoNo. I eat pretty decently - my wife has to be gluten free so that affects our meals at home, I normally have a salad, fruit and either chicken or salmon on my salad for lunch. However, I may be getting too much fruit - normally a apple (or 2), banana, orange a day. Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

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There is one very hard fast but simple rule to losing weight. More calories burned than consumed.

 

Now, I would strongly suggest getting an app on your phone (there are several really good ones) where you keep track of what you eat and what you do for exercise. This then calculates your calories you burn and consume. After a while, it becomes just a habit and easy to quickly input what you are doing. You can easily learn what to eat and what not to eat and how days where you don't exercise really hurts you in weight loss because you just aren't burning calories.

 

As far as working out, I find doing some weight training and some aerobic exercise is the best. If you can build some muscle, that larger muscle mass burns more calories even while you are sleeping. Change up your workouts. Let's say you are a runner. If that is all you do, your body gets used to the stress and becomes extremely efficient in doing that exercise and you actually burn fewer calories. So, maybe you lift a couple days per week. Maybe you run one or two days. Maybe you bike (at a pace your heart beat is elevated) a day. Maybe you swim or play basketball.

 

The idea is that you don't allow your body to get used to just one movement or exercise. Continually stressing it in different ways will show much bigger gains.

 

Again, burn more than you take in. If you do that, you will lose weight. I believe the medical profession will say that 3,500 calories equals one lb. So, if you burn 6,000 - 7,000 calories more per week than you consume, you should lose a couple lbs per week.

 

The app I told you about will help keep track of that.

 

Good luck.

very good info. Thanks much - I think I have been in too much of a routine -the same thing all the time. I use to belong to a club that had a pool and that is all I did was to swim. I think I gained a sore shoulder and didn't loose much weight

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Hey TGHusker, Why don't you start a HB Biggest Loser thread? I suspect there are several HB members, myself included, who would participate. I'm at around 216 right now. Would like to be at 195 lbs. when swimming pool season starts (around June 1). That might be unreachable since I haven't dipped below 200 in several years.

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One more thing. If you drink soft drinks.....STOP RIGHT NOW!!!!!

 

Even the diet varieties are absolutely some of the worst stuff you can put in your body and it will derail what you are trying to do here.

 

If you do drink it regularly, I challenge you to give it up for 60-90 days. Not one drop. After that, if you try it? It will be some of the grossest stuff you try to drink.

 

You also don't need sports drinks, supplements...etc.

 

Water...Drink more and more water.

I'm going to have to disagree on this...I used to drink mountain dew daily and quit cold turkey one day, and did not drink a soda for over 2 years. Then one day I had a diet coke, and it was the greatest thing I'd ever tasted. I am seriously addicted now and want to try and quit again. Hoping I can make that happen, i've tried a few times, but its been really tough.

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One more thing. If you drink soft drinks.....STOP RIGHT NOW!!!!!

 

Even the diet varieties are absolutely some of the worst stuff you can put in your body and it will derail what you are trying to do here.

 

If you do drink it regularly, I challenge you to give it up for 60-90 days. Not one drop. After that, if you try it? It will be some of the grossest stuff you try to drink.

 

You also don't need sports drinks, supplements...etc.

 

Water...Drink more and more water.

I'm going to have to disagree on this...I used to drink mountain dew daily and quit cold turkey one day, and did not drink a soda for over 2 years. Then one day I had a diet coke, and it was the greatest thing I'd ever tasted. I am seriously addicted now and want to try and quit again. Hoping I can make that happen, i've tried a few times, but its been really tough.

 

Hmmmm....interesting. You are one of the very few that I have found with that experience. Maybe it's because the people I know were drinking pop instead of soda.

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The idea is that you don't allow your body to get used to just one movement or exercise. Continually stressing it in different ways will show much bigger gains.

 

Again, burn more than you take in.

 

BRB is especially correct with these statements. In your age group, you also need to think about joint & bone health. Range of motion with different excercises will help with both of these. If you just do one thing, it's harder to push the body in regards to calorie management.

 

I am 6' and ~6 years ago, I decided to drop ~35 lbs. I have kept almost all of it off since then (~32.5 lbs). I played competive sports until my early 30s and that was when weight became an issue. I was running at least 7 miles per day, weight training at least 3x per week and eating healthy and still got out of balance on calorie intake vs expenditure.

 

It starts & ends with diet for your age group. The healthier you eat, the easier it will be, imo. With the exception of highly processed foods & soda, it's about moderation. Sugar is a killer as with most processed foods. My big issue was fresh fruit. I ate healthy but too much fresh fruit can be like too much soda...

 

One tip I got from a GI Dr & nutrionist that works with a lot of Olympic & pro atheletes is fiber intake. She was religous about males over middle-age needing well over 40g fiber daily. At least 60% from natural food sources (non-processed veggies). This is bare minimum & her general rule over 35+ was 45-50g per day. For myself, I found that staying within this range gave me way more flexibility with the rest of my diet. Her rule for meals was carb to fiber ratio...

 

My recommendation is definitely speak with someone in this space (GI and/or nutrionist) as it will make it much easier to make adjustments to your diet. Losing the wieght only to put it back on again starts a very unhealthy cycle. Best to avioid if you can...

 

Thanks everyone for your input. It is really appreciated. I think you hit on something here ColoNo. I eat pretty decently - my wife has to be gluten free so that affects our meals at home, I normally have a salad, fruit and either chicken or salmon on my salad for lunch. However, I may be getting too much fruit - normally a apple (or 2), banana, orange a day. Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

The importance of how much you're eating versus what you're eating can't be overstated..

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Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

This is something to pay attention to. Nuts are great and should be a part of a balanced diet, but you really have to be careful because they pack a punch. They're pretty high in fat, albeit the good kinds, which can be an issue if you're trying to lose weight. A 1/4 cup (a little more than a fist full) of mixed nuts is about 170-200 calories. They don't fill you up like other food sources, and for me personally that can be a problem because I can easily over-eat them.

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The idea is that you don't allow your body to get used to just one movement or exercise. Continually stressing it in different ways will show much bigger gains.

 

Again, burn more than you take in.

 

BRB is especially correct with these statements. In your age group, you also need to think about joint & bone health. Range of motion with different excercises will help with both of these. If you just do one thing, it's harder to push the body in regards to calorie management.

 

I am 6' and ~6 years ago, I decided to drop ~35 lbs. I have kept almost all of it off since then (~32.5 lbs). I played competive sports until my early 30s and that was when weight became an issue. I was running at least 7 miles per day, weight training at least 3x per week and eating healthy and still got out of balance on calorie intake vs expenditure.

 

It starts & ends with diet for your age group. The healthier you eat, the easier it will be, imo. With the exception of highly processed foods & soda, it's about moderation. Sugar is a killer as with most processed foods. My big issue was fresh fruit. I ate healthy but too much fresh fruit can be like too much soda...

 

One tip I got from a GI Dr & nutrionist that works with a lot of Olympic & pro atheletes is fiber intake. She was religous about males over middle-age needing well over 40g fiber daily. At least 60% from natural food sources (non-processed veggies). This is bare minimum & her general rule over 35+ was 45-50g per day. For myself, I found that staying within this range gave me way more flexibility with the rest of my diet. Her rule for meals was carb to fiber ratio...

 

My recommendation is definitely speak with someone in this space (GI and/or nutrionist) as it will make it much easier to make adjustments to your diet. Losing the wieght only to put it back on again starts a very unhealthy cycle. Best to avioid if you can...

 

Thanks everyone for your input. It is really appreciated. I think you hit on something here ColoNo. I eat pretty decently - my wife has to be gluten free so that affects our meals at home, I normally have a salad, fruit and either chicken or salmon on my salad for lunch. However, I may be getting too much fruit - normally a apple (or 2), banana, orange a day. Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

The importance of how much you're eating versus what you're eating can't be overstated..

 

Portion sizes are why most Americans are overweight. I include myself in that comment. I like to eat a lot of food when it tastes good.

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Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

This is something to pay attention to. Nuts are great and should be a part of a balanced diet, but you really have to be careful because they pack a punch. They're pretty high in fat, albeit the good kinds, which can be an issue if you're trying to lose weight. A 1/4 cup (a little more than a fist full) of mixed nuts is about 170-200 calories. They don't fill you up like other food sources, and for me personally that can be a problem because I can easily over-eat them.

 

One of my all time favorite snacks are almonds. I am always shocked at how many calories are in those things.

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The idea is that you don't allow your body to get used to just one movement or exercise. Continually stressing it in different ways will show much bigger gains.

 

Again, burn more than you take in.

 

BRB is especially correct with these statements. In your age group, you also need to think about joint & bone health. Range of motion with different excercises will help with both of these. If you just do one thing, it's harder to push the body in regards to calorie management.

 

I am 6' and ~6 years ago, I decided to drop ~35 lbs. I have kept almost all of it off since then (~32.5 lbs). I played competive sports until my early 30s and that was when weight became an issue. I was running at least 7 miles per day, weight training at least 3x per week and eating healthy and still got out of balance on calorie intake vs expenditure.

 

It starts & ends with diet for your age group. The healthier you eat, the easier it will be, imo. With the exception of highly processed foods & soda, it's about moderation. Sugar is a killer as with most processed foods. My big issue was fresh fruit. I ate healthy but too much fresh fruit can be like too much soda...

 

One tip I got from a GI Dr & nutrionist that works with a lot of Olympic & pro atheletes is fiber intake. She was religous about males over middle-age needing well over 40g fiber daily. At least 60% from natural food sources (non-processed veggies). This is bare minimum & her general rule over 35+ was 45-50g per day. For myself, I found that staying within this range gave me way more flexibility with the rest of my diet. Her rule for meals was carb to fiber ratio...

 

My recommendation is definitely speak with someone in this space (GI and/or nutrionist) as it will make it much easier to make adjustments to your diet. Losing the wieght only to put it back on again starts a very unhealthy cycle. Best to avioid if you can...

 

Thanks everyone for your input. It is really appreciated. I think you hit on something here ColoNo. I eat pretty decently - my wife has to be gluten free so that affects our meals at home, I normally have a salad, fruit and either chicken or salmon on my salad for lunch. However, I may be getting too much fruit - normally a apple (or 2), banana, orange a day. Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

The importance of how much you're eating versus what you're eating can't be overstated..

 

Portion sizes are why most Americans are overweight. I include myself in that comment. I like to eat a lot of food when it tastes good.

 

Americans eat absolutely stupid amounts of food.

 

Honestly, if you pay attention sometimes it is disgusting the amounts that some people eat.

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Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

This is something to pay attention to. Nuts are great and should be a part of a balanced diet, but you really have to be careful because they pack a punch. They're pretty high in fat, albeit the good kinds, which can be an issue if you're trying to lose weight. A 1/4 cup (a little more than a fist full) of mixed nuts is about 170-200 calories. They don't fill you up like other food sources, and for me personally that can be a problem because I can easily over-eat them.

 

One of my all time favorite snacks are almonds. I am always shocked at how many calories are in those things.

 

I will have some type of protein/nutrition bar each afternoon as a snack. They taste pretty good and have better nutritional value than a candy bar. I really like KIND healthy snack bars. They typically use peanuts, almonds, and other nuts as the main ingredient of the bar. They have recently introduced a savory line of snack bars, in addition to typical sweeter snack bars. http://www.kindsnacks.com/store/

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Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

This is something to pay attention to. Nuts are great and should be a part of a balanced diet, but you really have to be careful because they pack a punch. They're pretty high in fat, albeit the good kinds, which can be an issue if you're trying to lose weight. A 1/4 cup (a little more than a fist full) of mixed nuts is about 170-200 calories. They don't fill you up like other food sources, and for me personally that can be a problem because I can easily over-eat them.

 

One of my all time favorite snacks are almonds. I am always shocked at how many calories are in those things.

 

I will have some type of protein/nutrition bar each afternoon as a snack. They taste pretty good and have better nutritional value than a candy bar. I really like KIND healthy snack bars. They typically use peanuts, almonds, and other nuts as the main ingredient of the bar. They have recently introduced a savory line of snack bars, in addition to typical sweeter snack bars. http://www.kindsnacks.com/store/

 

Personally I don't care for bars. For the small amount of protein they do provide, they take away an awful lot of flexibility in your calories. I could eat yogurt and with more protein and less calories, or a piece of string cheese or two with much less calories and the same amount of protein.

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Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

This is something to pay attention to. Nuts are great and should be a part of a balanced diet, but you really have to be careful because they pack a punch. They're pretty high in fat, albeit the good kinds, which can be an issue if you're trying to lose weight. A 1/4 cup (a little more than a fist full) of mixed nuts is about 170-200 calories. They don't fill you up like other food sources, and for me personally that can be a problem because I can easily over-eat them.

 

One of my all time favorite snacks are almonds. I am always shocked at how many calories are in those things.

 

I will have some type of protein/nutrition bar each afternoon as a snack. They taste pretty good and have better nutritional value than a candy bar. I really like KIND healthy snack bars. They typically use peanuts, almonds, and other nuts as the main ingredient of the bar. They have recently introduced a savory line of snack bars, in addition to typical sweeter snack bars. http://www.kindsnacks.com/store/

 

Personally I don't care for bars. For the small amount of protein they do provide, they take away an awful lot of flexibility in your calories. I could eat yogurt and with more protein and less calories, or a piece of string cheese with much less calories and the same amount of protein.

 

To each their own in what they like to snack on. I like yogurt too, and it's a good source of dairy and protein, but I don't like cheese. My comment regarding bars had more to do with being an easy snack to keep at my desk at work, while also limiting the amount of what you eat to one, portion-controlled bar.

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

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The idea is that you don't allow your body to get used to just one movement or exercise. Continually stressing it in different ways will show much bigger gains.

 

Again, burn more than you take in.

 

BRB is especially correct with these statements. In your age group, you also need to think about joint & bone health. Range of motion with different excercises will help with both of these. If you just do one thing, it's harder to push the body in regards to calorie management.

 

I am 6' and ~6 years ago, I decided to drop ~35 lbs. I have kept almost all of it off since then (~32.5 lbs). I played competive sports until my early 30s and that was when weight became an issue. I was running at least 7 miles per day, weight training at least 3x per week and eating healthy and still got out of balance on calorie intake vs expenditure.

 

It starts & ends with diet for your age group. The healthier you eat, the easier it will be, imo. With the exception of highly processed foods & soda, it's about moderation. Sugar is a killer as with most processed foods. My big issue was fresh fruit. I ate healthy but too much fresh fruit can be like too much soda...

 

One tip I got from a GI Dr & nutrionist that works with a lot of Olympic & pro atheletes is fiber intake. She was religous about males over middle-age needing well over 40g fiber daily. At least 60% from natural food sources (non-processed veggies). This is bare minimum & her general rule over 35+ was 45-50g per day. For myself, I found that staying within this range gave me way more flexibility with the rest of my diet. Her rule for meals was carb to fiber ratio...

 

My recommendation is definitely speak with someone in this space (GI and/or nutrionist) as it will make it much easier to make adjustments to your diet. Losing the wieght only to put it back on again starts a very unhealthy cycle. Best to avioid if you can...

 

Thanks everyone for your input. It is really appreciated. I think you hit on something here ColoNo. I eat pretty decently - my wife has to be gluten free so that affects our meals at home, I normally have a salad, fruit and either chicken or salmon on my salad for lunch. However, I may be getting too much fruit - normally a apple (or 2), banana, orange a day. Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

 

TGHusker - in regards to the bolded: GF products like GF bread, GF pasta, GF cookies often have WAY more calories than their gluten counterpart (like 3-5x more). Look at the calories on these if you use them. Is your wife celiac or Gluten allergy?

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

There are usually two reasons why people say it's important to eat breakfast:

 

1) it jump starts your metabolism. I can see that and think it probably is true.

 

2) You end up starved at lunch and eat more than you should.

Well, I've learned to control # 2 and when I try to lose weight, I'm just not as good at it if I eat breakfast because I end up eating more calories.

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

Hey...I don't disagree that it's a terrible idea for most people. I even said above I don't recommend it.

 

I can't get away with eating a larger lunch and a lighter dinner due to having teenagers at home so we tend to make a larger meal at home for them in the evening.

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The idea is that you don't allow your body to get used to just one movement or exercise. Continually stressing it in different ways will show much bigger gains.

 

Again, burn more than you take in.

 

BRB is especially correct with these statements. In your age group, you also need to think about joint & bone health. Range of motion with different excercises will help with both of these. If you just do one thing, it's harder to push the body in regards to calorie management.

 

I am 6' and ~6 years ago, I decided to drop ~35 lbs. I have kept almost all of it off since then (~32.5 lbs). I played competive sports until my early 30s and that was when weight became an issue. I was running at least 7 miles per day, weight training at least 3x per week and eating healthy and still got out of balance on calorie intake vs expenditure.

 

It starts & ends with diet for your age group. The healthier you eat, the easier it will be, imo. With the exception of highly processed foods & soda, it's about moderation. Sugar is a killer as with most processed foods. My big issue was fresh fruit. I ate healthy but too much fresh fruit can be like too much soda...

 

One tip I got from a GI Dr & nutrionist that works with a lot of Olympic & pro atheletes is fiber intake. She was religous about males over middle-age needing well over 40g fiber daily. At least 60% from natural food sources (non-processed veggies). This is bare minimum & her general rule over 35+ was 45-50g per day. For myself, I found that staying within this range gave me way more flexibility with the rest of my diet. Her rule for meals was carb to fiber ratio...

 

My recommendation is definitely speak with someone in this space (GI and/or nutrionist) as it will make it much easier to make adjustments to your diet. Losing the wieght only to put it back on again starts a very unhealthy cycle. Best to avioid if you can...

 

Thanks everyone for your input. It is really appreciated. I think you hit on something here ColoNo. I eat pretty decently - my wife has to be gluten free so that affects our meals at home, I normally have a salad, fruit and either chicken or salmon on my salad for lunch. However, I may be getting too much fruit - normally a apple (or 2), banana, orange a day. Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

The importance of how much you're eating versus what you're eating can't be overstated..

 

Portion sizes are why most Americans are overweight. I include myself in that comment. I like to eat a lot of food when it tastes good.

 

 

Portion sizes in America are out of whack. The problem is lack an awareness of caloric, nutritional balance, & moderation. We need to be aware of all these things... A lot of vegetarians out here eat stupid amounts Kale & have kidney issues as a result (stones). It's a healthy superfood but in excess can be as unhealthy as anything else.

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

Hey...I don't disagree that it's a terrible idea for most people. I even said above I don't recommend it.

 

I can't get away with eating a larger lunch and a lighter dinner due to having teenagers at home so we tend to make a larger meal at home for them in the evening.

 

I am not looking forward to when my kids are teenagers and they eat everything in sight. Those grocery store bills have to be crazy.

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The idea is that you don't allow your body to get used to just one movement or exercise. Continually stressing it in different ways will show much bigger gains.

 

Again, burn more than you take in.

 

BRB is especially correct with these statements. In your age group, you also need to think about joint & bone health. Range of motion with different excercises will help with both of these. If you just do one thing, it's harder to push the body in regards to calorie management.

 

I am 6' and ~6 years ago, I decided to drop ~35 lbs. I have kept almost all of it off since then (~32.5 lbs). I played competive sports until my early 30s and that was when weight became an issue. I was running at least 7 miles per day, weight training at least 3x per week and eating healthy and still got out of balance on calorie intake vs expenditure.

 

It starts & ends with diet for your age group. The healthier you eat, the easier it will be, imo. With the exception of highly processed foods & soda, it's about moderation. Sugar is a killer as with most processed foods. My big issue was fresh fruit. I ate healthy but too much fresh fruit can be like too much soda...

 

One tip I got from a GI Dr & nutrionist that works with a lot of Olympic & pro atheletes is fiber intake. She was religous about males over middle-age needing well over 40g fiber daily. At least 60% from natural food sources (non-processed veggies). This is bare minimum & her general rule over 35+ was 45-50g per day. For myself, I found that staying within this range gave me way more flexibility with the rest of my diet. Her rule for meals was carb to fiber ratio...

 

My recommendation is definitely speak with someone in this space (GI and/or nutrionist) as it will make it much easier to make adjustments to your diet. Losing the wieght only to put it back on again starts a very unhealthy cycle. Best to avioid if you can...

 

Thanks everyone for your input. It is really appreciated. I think you hit on something here ColoNo. I eat pretty decently - my wife has to be gluten free so that affects our meals at home, I normally have a salad, fruit and either chicken or salmon on my salad for lunch. However, I may be getting too much fruit - normally a apple (or 2), banana, orange a day. Plus my "healthy' snacks typically are peanuts, nuts and sunflower seed (and the occasional junk salty chips from the snack machine). I rarely have a soda and we know the problem wt sugar (cancer loves it - so we use more healthy alternatives if possible). So I may be getting too many natural sugars from the fruit, too much salt from my snacks, and not enough fiber. I've lost 20 or more lbs before only to gain it back

Thanks for the input

 

The importance of how much you're eating versus what you're eating can't be overstated..

 

Portion sizes are why most Americans are overweight. I include myself in that comment. I like to eat a lot of food when it tastes good.

 

 

Portion sizes in America are out of whack. The problem is lack an awareness of caloric, nutritional balance, & moderation. We need to be aware of all these things... A lot of vegetarians out here eat stupid amounts Kale & have kidney issues as a result (stones). It's a healthy superfood but in excess can be as unhealthy as anything else.

 

Also, we have conditioned our kids to think they need a snack at every event there possibly is....soccer game??? must have snacks.....Husker game??? must have concessions...HS BB game???? must have concessions.

 

We don't need all this. The next time you are at an event like a Husker bb game or what ever, just sit and watch people. There are people who think they need to have something in their hands eating or drinking (pop) constantly throughout the event. Then, I'm sure they go eat a full meal before or after the event also.

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

 

Anything in your stomach first thing in the morning kick-starts the metabolism & digestive processes. Not doing this causes your body to think it needs to store fat. It gets your metabolism & digestive system working against you. You don't need to eat a lot but gotta eat something.

 

As far as going to bed hungry, be careful with that. You want to be satiated when you go to bed or you can fall into the same issues as not eating breakfast...

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

 

Anything in your stomach first thing in the morning kick-starts the metabolism & digestive processes. Not doing this causes your body to think it needs to store fat. It gets your metabolism & digestive system working against you. You don't need to eat a lot but gotta eat something.

 

As far as going to bed hungry, be careful with that. You want to be satiated when you go to bed or you can fall into the same issues as not eating breakfast...

 

Eating in bed can be fun, but it may not provide much caloric intake, if you know what I mean. chuckleshuffle

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

 

Anything in your stomach first thing in the morning kick-starts the metabolism & digestive processes. Not doing this causes your body to think it needs to store fat. It gets your metabolism & digestive system working against you. You don't need to eat a lot but gotta eat something.

 

As far as going to bed hungry, be careful with that. You want to be satiated when you go to bed or you can fall into the same issues as not eating breakfast...

 

This isn't necessarily true. Intermittent fasting may have some merit to it. Not eating for a 16 hour period can have your body burning fat stores. There aren't a whole lot of studies out there on it, but some show decreases in body fat and increase in insulin sensitivity.

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

 

Anything in your stomach first thing in the morning kick-starts the metabolism & digestive processes. Not doing this causes your body to think it needs to store fat. It gets your metabolism & digestive system working against you. You don't need to eat a lot but gotta eat something.

 

As far as going to bed hungry, be careful with that. You want to be satiated when you go to bed or you can fall into the same issues as not eating breakfast...

 

This isn't necessarily true. Intermittent fasting may have some merit to it. Not eating for a 16 hour period can have your body burning fat stores. There aren't a whole lot of studies out there on it, but some show decreases in body fat and increase in insulin sensitivity.

 

 

Two different things - Intermittent vs Consistent. Fasting will typically cause the body to burn stored nutrients. Doing this intermittently might not cause the "rebound" where your metabolism stays slow once you eat to store fat. Doing this consistenly will typically cause this rebound. Consistent Fasting without excercise increases the likelihood that muscle gets burned before fat reserves are touched.

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

 

Anything in your stomach first thing in the morning kick-starts the metabolism & digestive processes. Not doing this causes your body to think it needs to store fat. It gets your metabolism & digestive system working against you. You don't need to eat a lot but gotta eat something.

 

As far as going to bed hungry, be careful with that. You want to be satiated when you go to bed or you can fall into the same issues as not eating breakfast...

 

This isn't necessarily true. Intermittent fasting may have some merit to it. Not eating for a 16 hour period can have your body burning fat stores. There aren't a whole lot of studies out there on it, but some show decreases in body fat and increase in insulin sensitivity.

 

 

Two different things - Intermittent vs Consistent. Fasting will typically cause the body to burn stored nutrients. Doing this intermittently might not cause the "rebound" where your metabolism stays slow once you eat to store fat. Doing this consistenly will typically cause this rebound. Consistent Fasting without excercise increases the likelihood that muscle gets burned before fat reserves are touched.

 

Intermittent fasting has quite a few different meanings and one of the is what BRB is describing. Essentially not eating for an extended period of time everyday, but consuming what you need with in a window during the daytime. Nobody is talking about doing these diets without exercise. That's obviously an option but like you said your going to lose your muscle mass, as you would on any extended diet.

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I despise the word "diet".

 

I have chosen a different way of looking at and consuming food. It's a change in life style. Not a "diet".

 

The word "diet" to me seems temporary and I believe it's why people gain weight back after they lose it.

 

To maintain weight loss, you have to change how you look at food and how you eat.

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I despise the word "diet".

 

I have chosen a different way of looking at and consuming food. It's a change in life style. Not a "diet".

 

The word "diet" to me seems temporary and I believe it's why people gain weight back after they lose it.

 

To maintain weight loss, you have to change how you look at food and how you eat.

I feel the same way. I try to use diet in its most literal sense, the sum of food consumed, not the latest fad that everyone is on. Although sometimes there isn't a better descriptor...

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

 

Anything in your stomach first thing in the morning kick-starts the metabolism & digestive processes. Not doing this causes your body to think it needs to store fat. It gets your metabolism & digestive system working against you. You don't need to eat a lot but gotta eat something.

 

As far as going to bed hungry, be careful with that. You want to be satiated when you go to bed or you can fall into the same issues as not eating breakfast...

 

This isn't necessarily true. Intermittent fasting may have some merit to it. Not eating for a 16 hour period can have your body burning fat stores. There aren't a whole lot of studies out there on it, but some show decreases in body fat and increase in insulin sensitivity.

 

 

Two different things - Intermittent vs Consistent. Fasting will typically cause the body to burn stored nutrients. Doing this intermittently might not cause the "rebound" where your metabolism stays slow once you eat to store fat. Doing this consistenly will typically cause this rebound. Consistent Fasting without excercise increases the likelihood that muscle gets burned before fat reserves are touched.

 

Intermittent fasting has quite a few different meanings and one of the is what BRB is describing. Essentially not eating for an extended period of time everyday, but consuming what you need with in a window during the daytime. Nobody is talking about doing these diets without exercise. That's obviously an option but like you said your going to lose your muscle mass, as you would on any extended diet.

 

 

Sorry Zrod, you are referencing the fad diet/dieting pattern group. I did not realize that until this last post.

 

It's still totally different. Skipping breakfast just cuz is very different than going with a fad diet/dieting pattern with presciptive calorie/intake guidelines. It's passive vs active diet management...

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Look...with me skipping breakfast is simply a calories in calories burned decision. I have never ever been a big breakfast eater in my life so missing it really didn't mean much as far as hunger.

 

I don't recommend it.

 

The key though is that most people don't realize really how little food you really need and many people need to go through a period retraining their bodies to realize that also. You don't need that much food.

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

 

Anything in your stomach first thing in the morning kick-starts the metabolism & digestive processes. Not doing this causes your body to think it needs to store fat. It gets your metabolism & digestive system working against you. You don't need to eat a lot but gotta eat something.

 

As far as going to bed hungry, be careful with that. You want to be satiated when you go to bed or you can fall into the same issues as not eating breakfast...

 

This isn't necessarily true. Intermittent fasting may have some merit to it. Not eating for a 16 hour period can have your body burning fat stores. There aren't a whole lot of studies out there on it, but some show decreases in body fat and increase in insulin sensitivity.

 

 

Two different things - Intermittent vs Consistent. Fasting will typically cause the body to burn stored nutrients. Doing this intermittently might not cause the "rebound" where your metabolism stays slow once you eat to store fat. Doing this consistenly will typically cause this rebound. Consistent Fasting without excercise increases the likelihood that muscle gets burned before fat reserves are touched.

 

Intermittent fasting has quite a few different meanings and one of the is what BRB is describing. Essentially not eating for an extended period of time everyday, but consuming what you need with in a window during the daytime. Nobody is talking about doing these diets without exercise. That's obviously an option but like you said your going to lose your muscle mass, as you would on any extended diet.

 

 

Sorry Zrod, you are referencing the fad diet/dieting pattern group. I did not realize that until this last post.

 

It's still totally different. Skipping breakfast just cuz is very different than going with a fad diet/dieting pattern with presciptive calorie/intake guidelines. It's passive vs active diet management...

 

 

 

No, it's exactly the same. You're not eating for an extended period of time and then eating throughout the day. Either way there's enough evidence to suggest that when it comes to losing weight it doesn't matter whether or not you eat breakfast. If it works for you not to eat breakfast then do it, if not that's fine too.

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2014/06/05/skipping-breakfast-may-not-be-so-bad-for-weight-loss-study-finds/

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-berardi-phd/breakfast-health_b_4436439.html

 

https://www.yahoo.com/health/5-reasons-to-skip-breakfast-97835884338.html

 

I'm not into the fad stuff like Paleo, etc. you're body doesn't really know the difference between "good" carbs and "bad" carbs it just knows the differential in amounts. But personally I've tried IF for a little while and I like way that I felt and looked, it just wasn't practical for me to do it.

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

 

Anything in your stomach first thing in the morning kick-starts the metabolism & digestive processes. Not doing this causes your body to think it needs to store fat. It gets your metabolism & digestive system working against you. You don't need to eat a lot but gotta eat something.

 

As far as going to bed hungry, be careful with that. You want to be satiated when you go to bed or you can fall into the same issues as not eating breakfast...

 

This isn't necessarily true. Intermittent fasting may have some merit to it. Not eating for a 16 hour period can have your body burning fat stores. There aren't a whole lot of studies out there on it, but some show decreases in body fat and increase in insulin sensitivity.

 

 

Two different things - Intermittent vs Consistent. Fasting will typically cause the body to burn stored nutrients. Doing this intermittently might not cause the "rebound" where your metabolism stays slow once you eat to store fat. Doing this consistenly will typically cause this rebound. Consistent Fasting without excercise increases the likelihood that muscle gets burned before fat reserves are touched.

 

Intermittent fasting has quite a few different meanings and one of the is what BRB is describing. Essentially not eating for an extended period of time everyday, but consuming what you need with in a window during the daytime. Nobody is talking about doing these diets without exercise. That's obviously an option but like you said your going to lose your muscle mass, as you would on any extended diet.

 

 

Sorry Zrod, you are referencing the fad diet/dieting pattern group. I did not realize that until this last post.

 

It's still totally different. Skipping breakfast just cuz is very different than going with a fad diet/dieting pattern with presciptive calorie/intake guidelines. It's passive vs active diet management...

 

 

 

No, it's exactly the same. You're not eating for an extended period of time and then eating throughout the day. Either way there's enough evidence to suggest that when it comes to losing weight it doesn't matter whether or not you eat breakfast. If it works for you not to eat breakfast then do it, if not that's fine too.

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2014/06/05/skipping-breakfast-may-not-be-so-bad-for-weight-loss-study-finds/

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-berardi-phd/breakfast-health_b_4436439.html

 

https://www.yahoo.com/health/5-reasons-to-skip-breakfast-97835884338.html

 

I'm not into the fad stuff like Paleo, etc. you're body doesn't really know the difference between "good" carbs and "bad" carbs it just knows the differential in amounts. But personally I've tried IF for a little while and I like way that I felt and looked, it just wasn't practical for me to do it.

 

See, this is reasonable. Some people like IF, some people don't. There is no magic, really. If it works for you in terms of driving compliance with your overall calorie\macro goals then great. If not, that's cool too. It likely doesn't matter that much.

 

What does matter is long term commitment and working hard both in the kitchen and the gym. :)

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

 

Anything in your stomach first thing in the morning kick-starts the metabolism & digestive processes. Not doing this causes your body to think it needs to store fat. It gets your metabolism & digestive system working against you. You don't need to eat a lot but gotta eat something.

 

As far as going to bed hungry, be careful with that. You want to be satiated when you go to bed or you can fall into the same issues as not eating breakfast...

 

This isn't necessarily true. Intermittent fasting may have some merit to it. Not eating for a 16 hour period can have your body burning fat stores. There aren't a whole lot of studies out there on it, but some show decreases in body fat and increase in insulin sensitivity.

 

 

Two different things - Intermittent vs Consistent. Fasting will typically cause the body to burn stored nutrients. Doing this intermittently might not cause the "rebound" where your metabolism stays slow once you eat to store fat. Doing this consistenly will typically cause this rebound. Consistent Fasting without excercise increases the likelihood that muscle gets burned before fat reserves are touched.

 

Intermittent fasting has quite a few different meanings and one of the is what BRB is describing. Essentially not eating for an extended period of time everyday, but consuming what you need with in a window during the daytime. Nobody is talking about doing these diets without exercise. That's obviously an option but like you said your going to lose your muscle mass, as you would on any extended diet.

 

 

Sorry Zrod, you are referencing the fad diet/dieting pattern group. I did not realize that until this last post.

 

It's still totally different. Skipping breakfast just cuz is very different than going with a fad diet/dieting pattern with presciptive calorie/intake guidelines. It's passive vs active diet management...

 

 

 

No, it's exactly the same. You're not eating for an extended period of time and then eating throughout the day. Either way there's enough evidence to suggest that when it comes to losing weight it doesn't matter whether or not you eat breakfast. If it works for you not to eat breakfast then do it, if not that's fine too.

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2014/06/05/skipping-breakfast-may-not-be-so-bad-for-weight-loss-study-finds/

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-berardi-phd/breakfast-health_b_4436439.html

 

https://www.yahoo.com/health/5-reasons-to-skip-breakfast-97835884338.html

 

I'm not into the fad stuff like Paleo, etc. you're body doesn't really know the difference between "good" carbs and "bad" carbs it just knows the differential in amounts. But personally I've tried IF for a little while and I like way that I felt and looked, it just wasn't practical for me to do it.

 

 

I disagree. Active diet management is completely different than passive. I don't understand how you think they are the same. Those articles also state this.

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I disagree. Active diet management is completely different than passive. I don't understand how you think they are the same. Those articles also state this.

What do you mean by active versus passive diet management?

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Here is something I do that I honestly don't recommend for anyone else but I have figured it out that it works for me.

I don't eat ANYTHING before noon.

 

I know...I know....Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

 

Well, what I do is don't eat anything till noon. I will then eat a very light lunch like a salad or wrap. I try to keep it to around 500-600 calories. I then eat a fairly normal meal in the evening with the family that will be around 1000 calories. So, I end up with around 1500 calories for which is always my goal. The maximum I ever want to go is 2000 calories. This leaves me some room if I see something I want to snack on in the afternoon.

 

Again....it works for me but I don't recommend it.

 

What I find is if I eat breakfast, I really don't change what I eat the rest of the day and I end up with more calories than I want.

I've heard actually that is a bad idea, because it gets the body to slow its metabolism. I don't know how true that is, but I try to start my day with something, however small, soon after waking up. But, again, what works for one may not work for another. I like the idea of maybe having a smaller dinner than lunch, but that rarely works for me.

 

Not eating breakfast is a terrible idea. After a night of sleep, your body is starving for something to fuel itself.

 

What I typically try to do is eat breakfast, but try to have my biggest meal of the day at lunch, and then eat a light dinner. I have all afternoon/evening to burn the calories from lunch, and then I try to go to bed slightly hungry.

 

 

Anything in your stomach first thing in the morning kick-starts the metabolism & digestive processes. Not doing this causes your body to think it needs to store fat. It gets your metabolism & digestive system working against you. You don't need to eat a lot but gotta eat something.

 

As far as going to bed hungry, be careful with that. You want to be satiated when you go to bed or you can fall into the same issues as not eating breakfast...

 

Eating in bed can be fun, but it may not provide much caloric intake, if you know what I mean. chuckleshuffle

 

:wub::facepalm: - kind of got off topic

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Guys - lot of great discussion here and ideas. I think I'll take NUance's advise and start a Biggest Loser thread. I'll throw out the idea and we can determine the rules on who lost the most - is it by total pounds (obvious answer) or by % of goal met, or beginning weight vs ending weight ratio, etc. If you guys have a best way of doing this, chip in on the thread. I'll start it.

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