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Thanks_Tom RR

The True Value of In-state Recruits

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A quick sidebar before the meat of my post, I am throwing this out to everyone to get some perspective about what it means to be an in-state recruit. Ultimately, I use the recruitment of two local prospects currently being recruited as examples; however, this conversation has little to do with them outside of how it has made me think about in-state recruiting.

 

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When you ask yourself, "What is the value to in-state recruiting"? More importantly, when Frost's staff asks that question, the answer distills to the concept that a local kid who grew up cheering for Nebraska and living in the community understands the values and traditions of the program and will be the model of dedication and hard work that others in the program will be measured against and molded to emulate. The other day on Sharp & Benning, they debated if in-state recruits should be asked "Do you love Nebraska football"?, I think about this question as a litmus test as to whether a recruit will represent the TRUE expectations of an in-state player.  

 

Now, if a local kid says "No" to this question, should you still recruit him? Yes, definitely. I am sure most kids recruited out of state can not say "Yes" to that question. You still want quality talent in the program, regardless of where that talent is coming from. However, a local kid that can not say "Yes" to that question, in my opinion, does not represent any greater value of leadership and accountability that any out of state recruit could not fill.  

 

This leads us to the conversations that surround the recruitment of Nick Henrich and Chris Hickman. If these guys are not die-hard Nebraska fans, you should still definitely recruit them. They are both talented players, so you recruit them like you would any other prospect of equal talent. However, I think fans and media alike should realize the real value of "locking down the border". It is a concept of getting great talent that has a passion for the program, an understanding of its traditions and history, and a desire to represent all that it means to be a Husker. If you are a highly talented, in-state prospect without a passion for the state school, you are equal to a highly talented, out of state prospect.

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Kids being recruited today were barely alive or not even born the last time Nebraska had any sense of value or tradition.  If they understand any of what happened in the 90's, it's because their parents are telling them about it.

 

From the moment Tom Osborne insisted Frank Solich be named the head coach after he retired, all sense of identity started to slowly dissipate into what just transpired last season.  20 years of irrelevancy is the identity of this program right now.  Until there is a coach or a team that changes that, I wouldn't bank on the "love of the Huskers" as any kind of test whether an in-state kid will do anything great for the team.  Good players want to go where they think they can win.

 

Having said that, I admire every local kid today that says they have always loved the Huskers.  It speaks volumes to their loyalty.  And that should be appreciated.

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There is no doubt that the unwavering loyalty on instate kids isn’t what it used to be, that being said I feel getting a NE kid who isn’t a lifelong fan of NU is still worth more to the program than a similar caliber player from out of state.

 

Anytime a local kid sees older star local kids/ex-teammates making good at NU and hear about their experience at NU, it makes it a more intriguing option to go to DONU even if they don’t have the typical local kid affinity for the Cornhuskers. They can visualize being a star close to home with their buddies. They get positive reinforcement hearing from their former teammates on why they chose NU over ND or Wisconsin. Getting a 4 star from out of state doesn’t add that value component.

 

I also think as more local kids start to go to DONU, it increases the value of DONU to the younger kids as they now have ties to the local school and a better relationship with NU coaches. This coupled with a return to winning ways, helps re-cement DONU as the only choice for top in-state D1 prospects going forward. 

Edited by caveman99
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That quote for Garret Snodgrass represents the point that I am making as to the value of in-state recruits. Now, imagine a in-state prospect that has every reason to be a superfan of the program as aspirations to play for the team but does not. Instead, he gets a close up view of the program and is indifferent.

 

In fact, I have a cousin born and raised in Nebraska but is a huge Texas fan and actively roots against the Huskers. He loves to troll others of Facebook and Twitter after a Nebraska loss. No way you could recruit him to Nebraska, nor would you want to.

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1 hour ago, Thanks_Tom RR said:

That quote for Garret Snodgrass represents the point that I am making as to the value of in-state recruits. Now, imagine a in-state prospect that has every reason to be a superfan of the program as aspirations to play for the team but does not. Instead, he gets a close up view of the program and is indifferent.

 

In fact, I have a cousin born and raised in Nebraska but is a huge Texas fan and actively roots against the Huskers. He loves to troll others of Facebook and Twitter after a Nebraska loss. No way you could recruit him to Nebraska, nor would you want to.

 

How did that mutant get into your gene pool?

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15 hours ago, Thanks_Tom RR said:

That quote for Garret Snodgrass represents the point that I am making as to the value of in-state recruits. Now, imagine a in-state prospect that has every reason to be a superfan of the program as aspirations to play for the team but does not. Instead, he gets a close up view of the program and is indifferent.

 

In fact, I have a cousin born and raised in Nebraska but is a huge Texas fan and actively roots against the Huskers. He loves to troll others of Facebook and Twitter after a Nebraska loss. No way you could recruit him to Nebraska, nor would you want to.

 

I was born in Kansas. Lived in McCook Neb when i was very young. Moved to Oklahoma and ended up in Texas in 2nd grade. Surrounded by Texas people I always get the question how did you become a Husker fan. MY reply. You wouldn't understand. I have a freshman and sophomore that play football. I am in Husker gear 5 out of the 7 days of the week. When I would show up to practice or games kids would look at me like  I was a scout lol.. 

 

My sophomore has been a fan of Nebraska since he started playing football mostly due to me of coarse. But that all changed 2 years ago when we made our 1st trip to Lincoln for a game. When we walked out of the tunnel onto the field he looked at his mom and I and said.. I will play here. Attended FNL last year and fell even more into love with the school and what they represent. We will be back this summer for the FNL and Line camp in June.  

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16 hours ago, Dilly Dilly said:

 

How did that mutant get into your gene pool?

Cousin by marriage; no blood relation. :D:D

 

 

2 hours ago, BaytownHusker said:

 

I was born in Kansas. Lived in McCook Neb when i was very young. Moved to Oklahoma and ended up in Texas in 2nd grade. Surrounded by Texas people I always get the question how did you become a Husker fan. MY reply. You wouldn't understand. I have a freshman and sophomore that play football. I am in Husker gear 5 out of the 7 days of the week. When I would show up to practice or games kids would look at me like  I was a scout lol.. 

 

My sophomore has been a fan of Nebraska since he started playing football mostly due to me of coarse. But that all changed 2 years ago when we made our 1st trip to Lincoln for a game. When we walked out of the tunnel onto the field he looked at his mom and I and said.. I will play here. Attended FNL last year and fell even more into love with the school and what they represent. We will be back this summer for the FNL and Line camp in June.  

That kind of fervor is what you want from an in-state recruit, but I have no doubt that out of state legacies or prospects born in a Husker-friendly home can grow that same passion naturally, as it sounds your son did. Thanks for sharing.

 

Really my point is to ask what do people except from an in-state recruit that demands good in-state recruitment? It cannot just be a convenience issue, right? They are in our backyard, so it should be a "no brainer". Rather, it is about the commitment that they will have to the program on Day 1, and the expectation that that will create an environment were you stick out if you are not 100% :3DN:

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1 hour ago, Thanks_Tom RR said:

Cousin by marriage; no blood relation. :D:D

 

 

That kind of fervor is what you want from an in-state recruit, but I have no doubt that out of state legacies or prospects born in a Husker-friendly home can grow that same passion naturally, as it sounds your son did. Thanks for sharing.

 

Really my point is to ask what do people except from an in-state recruit that demands good in-state recruitment? It cannot just be a convenience issue, right? They are in our backyard, so it should be a "no brainer". Rather, it is about the commitment that they will have to the program on Day 1, and the expectation that that will create an environment were you stick out if you are not 100% :3DN:

 

Yea my post was really about nothing .. Just sharing.  But I agree if you have 2 kids that grade out the exact and you can only have one you take the in state kid.

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Quote

“I guess the way I look at it is when there are guys in this state that are a priority, and I'm in charge of them, I would not feel very good if they went to a neighboring college,” Ruud said. “I know growing up when guys would leave the state I would be like ‘what are you doing? You can't leave Nebraska, you're supposed to be in Nebraska.’

 

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The other thing Ruud understands that a lot of outsiders don't, is most in-state players are not the finished product.

 

Nebraska is not Texas, Florida or California. You have to project a little bit, and see what a guy could ultimately become. Players like Brandon Reilly and Spencer Long are perfect examples. They came in as walk-ons with upside, they bought into Nebraska and now are both on NFL rosters.

 

“It's up to us, too, to evaluate guys the right way, too,” Ruud said. “And you see this throughout Nebraska. Nebraska's a different deal because we're not doing seven-on-seven tournaments for 12 months a year. We have three-sport athletes, we have kids that have summer jobs, and you have to be able to project kids. Some kids are easy to evaluate that are studs in the biggest classes. It’s the Class C and Class D kids that play three sports, you have to be able to project those kids and see what they can do for us. It’s important to keep the really good ones in-state, but it’s also to evaluate the guys and see what they can could be.”

 

 

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