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ZRod    2,654

In a world where science is based on facts and that is where truth comes from, how do we wrap our minds around the fact that space never ends?

 

That's an oversimplification of "science." Science doesn't claim to answer all things, or have the answer to all things that falls within its purview. It's a means to an end, and sometimes the end isn't known yet.

 

 

I didn't say Science has all the answers. What I said was that is where we find facts and truth comes from facts.

 

BUT......Scientifically, I have never seen anyone explain how space can never end. So, obviously, we don't have that answer.

 

When I think of space, I feel like I'm from the 15th century and everyone thinks the world is flat until someone sailed a boat around the world and didn't fall off. What is space and what is beyond space? If nothing is beyond space, how is that possible?

I think technically there could be an end to the universe, and I think there are theories out there that the universe is something like a bubble and there may be more just like it. But we can only see 13.7 billion light years, or the age of the universe, so we have no way of truly knowing if there is a brick wall somewhere out there or not. I think scientists just assume it's infinite for ease of calculations and because of the fact that the rate of expansion is increasing.

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Landlord    7,375

Not looking for the why as in 'how', looking for the why as in 'why' :P

How did I know? That would be a branch of science or art, however you view it, called philosophy my friend!

 

 

Philosophy is not a branch of science - in fact, science could and would not exist without philosophical presuppositions with which to ground itself on.

 

The point that I was making being that science is not the only and exhaustive source of truth, like BigRedBuster claims.

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ZRod    2,654

Not looking for the why as in 'how', looking for the why as in 'why' :P

How did I know? That would be a branch of science or art, however you view it, called philosophy my friend!

 

 

Philosophy is not a branch of science - in fact, science could and would not exist without philosophical presuppositions with which to ground itself on.

 

The point that I was making being that science is not the only and exhaustive source of truth, like BigRedBuster claims.

I know exactly what your point was, it's been made before.

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knapplc    17,832

That's a future black hole, that's what that is. That much mass in that small of a space (relatively speaking), when that sucker goes nova it's gonna collapse like Mark Mangino dancing on a card table.

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Junior    1,277

In a world where science is based on facts and that is where truth comes from, how do we wrap our minds around the fact that space never ends?

 

Try to wrap your head around string theory. Or the theory that the energy that created the big bang was actually another universe bumping into ours. Eventually, I just quit because my head starts hurting.

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Comish    362

For a brief moment, I thought I was staring at the empty vastness of Kevin Cosgrove's playbook.

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knapplc    17,832

Here's a comparison of what the other planets would look like in our night sky if they were as close to Earth as the Moon:

 

The moon

nmfdBLw.jpg

Venus

uELgL7X.jpg

Mars

IRArcjO.jpg

Jupiter

5HeCYlt.jpg

Saturn

7EkX3SR.jpg

Uranus

WRKMfja.jpg

Neptune

cbECuy8.jpg

 

 

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GM_Tood    1,409

The Sombrero Galaxy (M104) is a brilliant white, bulbous core encircled by the thick dust lanes that make up its spiral structure. As seen from Earth, the galaxy is titled nearly edge on: We view it from just 6 degrees north of its equatorial plane.

 

At a relatively bright magnitude of +8, M104 is just beyond the limit of naked-eye visibility and is easily seen through small telescopes. The Sombrero lies at the southern edge of the rich Virgo cluster of galaxies and is one of the most massive objects in that group, equivalent to 800 billion suns.

 

The galaxy is 50,000 light-years across and is 28 million light-years from the Earth.

 

(pic taken from Hubble Telescope)

 

89979_Hubble_STScI_2003_28.jpg

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BigRedBuster    7,314

What if our solar system is really similar to atoms and we are living on electrons (earth) circling the nucleus (sun)? We then are microscopic (relatively speaking) particles and part of a huge living organism that is part of a mega eco system larger than our brains can fathom.

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Count 'Bility    4,782

What if our solar system is really similar to atoms and we are living on electrons (earth) circling the nucleus (sun)? We then are microscopic (relatively speaking) particles and part of a huge living organism that is part of a mega eco system larger than our brains can fathom.

I wonder about stuff like this EVERY FRICKIN DAY.

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B.B. Hemingway    1,472

What if our solar system is really similar to atoms and we are living on electrons (earth) circling the nucleus (sun)? We then are microscopic (relatively speaking) particles and part of a huge living organism that is part of a mega eco system larger than our brains can fathom.

Horton-hears-a-who-pics-horton-hears-a-who-19717311-1109-529.jpg

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GSG    5,518

This is similar to the one Walks posted on the first page, but it's been updated to include some new information

 

RbNdo.gif

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huKSer    1,347

What if our solar system is really similar to atoms and we are living on electrons (earth) circling the nucleus (sun)? We then are microscopic (relatively speaking) particles and part of a huge living organism that is part of a mega eco system larger than our brains can fathom.

 

@ 2:50

 

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ZRod    2,654

What language is that?

Its in a different language? I didn't have the audio up

Yeah, its Italian or Portuguese I think. Maybe Spanish but I didn't recognize much of it.

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Junior    1,277

http://www.nasa.gov/content/two-moons-passing-in-the-night/#.UffSZ43CaSo

 

pia17120.jpg?itok=CAao0D3n

 

The Saturn moons Mimas and Pandora remind us of how different they are when they appear together, as in this image taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Pandora's small size means that it lacks sufficient gravity to pull itself into a round shape like its larger sibling, Mimas. Researchers believe that the elongated shape of Pandora (50 miles, or 81 kilometers across) may hold clues to how it and other moons near Saturn's rings formed.

 

This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Mimas (246 miles, or 396 kilometers across). North on Mimas is up and rotated 28 degrees to the right. The image was taken in blue light with Cassini's narrow-angle camera on May 14, 2013. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 690,000 miles (1.1 million kilometers) from Mimas. Image scale is 4 miles (7 kilometers) per pixel. Pandora was at a distance of 731,000 miles (1.2 million kilometers) when this image was taken. Image scale on Pandora is 4 miles (7 kilometers) per pixel.

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GM_Tood    1,409

http://www.nasa.gov/...t/#.UffSZ43CaSo

 

pia17120.jpg?itok=CAao0D3n

 

The Saturn moons Mimas and Pandora remind us of how different they are when they appear together, as in this image taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. Pandora's small size means that it lacks sufficient gravity to pull itself into a round shape like its larger sibling, Mimas. Researchers believe that the elongated shape of Pandora (50 miles, or 81 kilometers across) may hold clues to how it and other moons near Saturn's rings formed.

 

This view looks toward the anti-Saturn hemisphere of Mimas (246 miles, or 396 kilometers across). North on Mimas is up and rotated 28 degrees to the right. The image was taken in blue light with Cassini's narrow-angle camera on May 14, 2013. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 690,000 miles (1.1 million kilometers) from Mimas. Image scale is 4 miles (7 kilometers) per pixel. Pandora was at a distance of 731,000 miles (1.2 million kilometers) when this image was taken. Image scale on Pandora is 4 miles (7 kilometers) per pixel.

That's the f*ing Death Star. Oh sh!t!

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knapplc    17,832

When they first flew Voyager past Mimas and saw that crater, one of the NASA scientists famously exclaimed, "Is that the engine!?!?"

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GM_Tood    1,409

This image of a pair of interacting galaxies (a rose made of galaxies) called Arp 273 was released to celebrate the 21st anniversary of the launch of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

 

The distorted shape of the larger of the two galaxies shows signs of tidal interactions with the smaller of the two. It is thought that the smaller galaxy has actually passed through the larger one.

 

Credit:

NASA, ESA and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)

 

heic1107a.jpg

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ZRod    2,654

That's the f*ing Death Star. Oh sh!t!

I believe the quote is:

 

"That's no moon, It's a space station!"

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GM_Tood    1,409

That's the f*ing Death Star. Oh sh!t!

I believe the quote is:

 

"That's no moon, It's a space station!"

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EbylHusker    478

To bring up a previous point, scientists do not necessarily assume the universe is infinite. There are a lot of competing theories on whether the universe is finite or infinite, and bound or unbound, etc. It's actually a very active topic. The truth is, we don't know and very likely will never know (barring some kind of discovery that the universe is finite and bound, so one of the galaxies we are viewing out there is actually the Milky Way from a different perspective).

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EbylHusker    478

If they're outside our solar system, yes. But the world "alien" gets more readers/viewers than the more proper term "extrasolar" normally does. The phrases are redundant when viewed in context, but it's how this stuff is written about.

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