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HuskerNBigD

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About HuskerNBigD

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    Travel Squad
  • Birthday 12/08/1989

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    Dallas, Tx

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  1. I’d imagine leaving home to get groceries would still be acceptable, right? If not, imagine the hysteria at the local super markets over the next few days. Be worse than it already is.
  2. apples to oranges. The Fed was responsible for the infusion of capital, lowering interest rates, and other QE measures. This would be Congress. And at least it’s a start, more than our President seems to be offering or suggesting. With >209MM adults in the US that’s a far cry from 1/5000th.
  3. Sounds like you need a refresher on monetary policies, and the Fed’s roles and responsibilities, including its jurisdiction. but kuddos on the snide comment.
  4. Ah, you're probably right. Didn't even think of it in that terms, tend to take a myopic view given that my profession is centered on capital raising for the various hydrocarbon producers (Energy Investment Banking). So that is correct, from a fuel standpoint this is a good thing. No worries, energy is one of the more esoteric / highly nuanced industries when it comes to lingo. Add on the finance lingo (which again seems to be way too complicated for what it really is - accounting), and its just entirely too complex. With regards to the net positive stance, I'd say highly dependent on regional dependence. For example, at a macro level, its positive as @BigRedBuster alluded to with the decrease in energy / gas prices. But that is only as far as consumers continue their trend of consumption. Which is a bit more cloudy, since we aren't too sure how big of an impact coronavirus will have on the economy / consumer trends. If everyone foregoes traveling (i.e. utilization) it is almost a wasted benefit. The country's GDP is also less impacted by the energy space (due in large part to the oversupply from increased production which has resulted in lower gasoline prices over the last ~4-5 years), which means you'd expect the consumers to benefit with less than historical norm headwinds associated with lower profits from the independents. Here in Texas, the economy will be a bit more negatively impacted, just due to the value chain shutting down (i.e. lower skilled workers who make $80-100k in the oil fields will no longer be in demand). It is quite fascinating seeing all the red on the RBCRichardsonBarr website, which tracks most of the O&G names. http://www.rbcrichardsonbarr.com/ Edit: With regards to your initial question, you should see a quicker impact on gasoline prices than ~6 weeks. Sorry, almost forgot to answer that!
  5. Yeah, I'm not sure Trump fully understands the value chain associated with nat gas production. Our oversupply is a by product of Shale production, which means it'll take quite some time for any sort of positive bounce in Nat Gas prices to be realized. As you said, strip pricing has bumped up, but is still hovering around $2/bbl. 6 months is far too long for Aramco to keep prices as depressed as the market currently has them priced, based of spot prices. People seem to forget that Aramco is still in the midst of trying to IPO on various exchanges and the depressed prices will not bode well for their offerings (stock is currently trading below what it IPO'd at on the local Saudi exchange).
  6. Here's what's sad, when I was in college (2008-2012) the minimum GPA to compete for the NCAA was a 1.8. You read that correctly, a 1.8
  7. While I don't think we've had issues recruiting for a divisional title, I was thinking a bit more ambitiously (conference and national title contender). I'd agree we have the talent to win the West, just need development and fine-tuning of coaching, both of which are definitely obtainable.
  8. I'll go ahead and say it, I believe we're at a point in time where having a bag man, or handler, is just the norm. Whether it is right or wrong is another debate and one that I really don't want to delve into, but if we're to be competitive in the recruiting process we need to be willing to play the game.
  9. I’m still trying to figure out to whom I redeem the points to and what my prize options are.
  10. We’re long past using common sense in society. Plus, people need something to b!^@h about on social media.
  11. You keep reiterating this point on multiple threads, but at a certain point you've got to at least put some of the blame on Martinez. It's bush league to just deflect all it towards the offensive line. He has been inconsistent in his passing all season long. Sans the first game, the whole high-snap thing hasnt really been an issue. What I mean by that is that there is one or two a game, but this isn't some scapegoat that everyone was using for South Alabama. He looks off. I'm not sure if its the weight he put on, or what, but something is different. His touch isn't there at all. He left J.D. out to dry all last game and he was throwing to ghosts this game. I'm not ready to give up on him, I think he's got spectacular talent and potential, but I wonder if he's overthinking things a bit too much. Similar to Mund at A&M, these guys are dual-threat and when they spend too much time in the pocket running through progressions, they lose half of what makes them special.
  12. Martinez looks noticeably different this year. You can still have gaudy numbers and not look great. He has no touch on his passes - he left Spielman out to dry so many times in that Illinois game, I was surprise to see #10 be able to walk by the end. You could argue that QB yardage is a benefactor of excellent WR play, not the cause of it.
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