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GM_Tood    1,409

s_h10_hs201247.jpg

 

A Multi-Wavelength View of Radio Galaxy Hercules A. Spectacular jets powered by the gravitational energy of a supermassive black hole in the core of the elliptical galaxy Hercules A illustrate the combined imaging power of two of astronomy's cutting-edge tools, the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3, and the recently upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. Some two billion light-years away, the yellowish elliptical galaxy in the center of the image appears quite ordinary as seen by Hubble in visible wavelengths of light.

 

The galaxy is roughly 1,000 times more massive than the Milky Way and harbors a 2.5-billion-solar-mass central black hole that is 1,000 times more massive than the black hole in the Milky Way. But the innocuous-looking galaxy, also known as 3C 348, has long been known as the brightest radio-emitting object in the constellation Hercules. Emitting nearly a billion times more power in radio wavelengths than our Sun, the galaxy is one of the brightest extragalactic radio sources in the entire sky.

 

The VLA radio data reveal enormous, optically invisible jets that, at one-and-a-half million light-years wide, dwarf the visible galaxy from which they emerge. The jets are very-high-energy plasma beams, subatomic particles and magnetic fields shot at nearly the speed of light from the vicinity of the black hole. The outer portions of both jets show unusual ring-like structures suggesting a history of multiple outbursts from the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy. The innermost parts of the jets are not visible because of the extreme velocity of the material, which causes relativistic effects that beam the light away from us. Far from the galaxy, the jets become unstable and break up into the rings and wisps.

 

(NASA, ESA, S. Baum and C. O'Dea (RIT), R. Perley and W. Cotton (NRAO/AUI/NSF), and the Hubble Heritage Team, STScI/AURA)

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EbylHusker    478

I'm not sure if anyone noticed, but there is a nova (not supernova) now visible to the naked eye. It brightened up to about 4.5ish magnitude, which means if you are under truly dark skies, you could see it with the naked eye.

 

http://www.space.com...-discovery.html

 

http://www.universet...om-our-readers/

 

It's actually not hard to find with a pair of binoculars even in light polluted skies. Here's a pic I snapped. The curving line of three stars that ends in a prong is pretty distinctive.

 

210492Nova_Delphini_2013_Labels_Web.jpg

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MLB 51    893

Anyone here into amateur astronomy?

 

Edit - Oh, I forgot to post this as well. If you're interested in recent news on science in general, including astronomy, this is a great site.

 

www.phys.org

I used to be. Had a small telescope. Never could get the damn to focus properly. Actually took an astronomy class my first year of college. Don't have much time for it now. I've bee working the midnight shift for the past 12 years.

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EbylHusker    478

Yeah, working the late shift really kills much chance for all that. China's entry into the optics market has drastically improved the quality of affordable scopes over the last 10 years or so. Your basic scope from Celestron or Meade, for instance, is now very good, even if you get a cheap one. It's often the mount, focuser, and accessories that are skimped on these days.

 

If you ever want, or have the time, to get back into it, local astronomy clubs are usually very welcoming about letting people use their scopes during outreach events or allowing the public to attend meetings. Lincoln's club holds a public night at the Hyde Observatory every Saturday night. I'd be shocked if the clubs in your area didn't do something similar with outreach, or at the very least hold open meetings where anyone can attend.

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EbylHusker    478

It's an interesting theory, but one that makes a lot of assumptions and interpretations of things that favor this certain theory, while ignoring others. That's nothing against this theory, though, since all theories on the origin of life on this planet do just that. What a lot of people don't understand, unfortunately, is that most of these types of things are riddled with assumptions and interpretations that are crafted to intentionally favor the researcher's pet theory.

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knapplc    17,833

Jupiter and one of its moons, Io, with an erupting volcano.

 

Io is the only body in the solar system other than the earth known to have active volcanoes.

 

l018aYN.jpg

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ZRod    2,654

Anybody know if these images are still colored in or are we are seeing the real colors these days? I'm too lazy/busy to look it up right now. I know the Nebula's and such are, but I didn't know if images from newer satellites were or not.

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EbylHusker    478

Anybody know if these images are still colored in or are we are seeing the real colors these days? I'm too lazy/busy to look it up right now. I know the Nebula's and such are, but I didn't know if images from newer satellites were or not.

 

I'm not sure. Hubble, for instance, doesn't actually take color pictures, but has filters that only allow certain wavelengths of light through. By analyzing and combining data from different wavelengths, and assigning colors to wavelengths, color images are produced. Cassini's cameras work in a similar fashion. That said, this method does allow them to produce "accurate" colors as they believe you'd see if you were actually there viewing it.

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ZRod    2,654

Anybody know if these images are still colored in or are we are seeing the real colors these days? I'm too lazy/busy to look it up right now. I know the Nebula's and such are, but I didn't know if images from newer satellites were or not.

 

I'm not sure. Hubble, for instance, doesn't actually take color pictures, but has filters that only allow certain wavelengths of light through. By analyzing and combining data from different wavelengths, and assigning colors to wavelengths, color images are produced. Cassini's cameras work in a similar fashion. That said, this method does allow them to produce "accurate" colors as they believe you'd see if you were actually there viewing it.

Right I knew the gist of how it was done. I've always wonder if the images were totally accurate though, and not over saturated or what have you. I wish they were able to take a "true" picture instead of putting composites together from the different spectrum.

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EbylHusker    478

Well, what you get out of a DSLR isn't really a "true" picture in terms of what the human eye sees (and more to the point, what the brain perceives). So whether you've got a conventional RGB sensor that records the data in that way, or are using filters and then compositing wavelength band pictures, the end result is still pretty much the same.

 

As for bumping in saturation, contrast, etc, I'm sure many are. But you'd probably have to find comments about each specific image to know for sure.

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knapplc    17,833

Of white blood cells and stars

 

"If you brought the Sun down to the size of a white blood cell (7 micrometres), and then brought everything else down to scale, our galaxy, the Milky Way, would be the size of the continental U.S.A."

 

o1p6PGK.jpg

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tschu    1,594

I'm so pumped for Comet Ison aka C/2012 S1. I might be setting myself up for a massive disappointment, but I still remember watching comet Hale-Bopp in '97, looking out west from our driveway into the evening sky. For weeks! If only I was old enough to appreciate what I was seeing - an incredible comet event that might never occur in my lifetime again. Come November and onwards, we'll find out if the comet will amaze us or fizzle and disappoint us. I want to believe....

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MLB 51    893

I'm so pumped for Comet Ison aka C/2012 S1. I might be setting myself up for a massive disappointment, but I still remember watching comet Hale-Bopp in '97, looking out west from our driveway into the evening sky. For weeks! If only I was old enough to appreciate what I was seeing - an incredible comet event that might never occur in my lifetime again. Come November and onwards, we'll find out if the comet will amaze us or fizzle and disappoint us. I want to believe....

So you didn't drink the kool-aid with all the others. :D

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EbylHusker    478

ISON hasn't been living up to the hype since emerging from behind the sun, unfortunately.

 

http://earthsky.org/space/big-sun-diving-comet-ison-might-be-spectacular-in-2013

 

Still, we'll see how it goes. The real fear is that it will not survive the close pass to the sun, which I think is a very distinct, and disappointing, possibility.

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knapplc    17,833

I'm pretty bummed about ISON, too. I was so stoked for the two comets this year, only to see Pan-STARRS completely underwhelm. Now it seems like ISON isn't going to be "as bright as the moon in the daytime sky" like they were hoping.

 

I was pretty impressed with Hale-Bopp back in the day - named a couple of my fantasy sports teams The Comets because of it - and I was really hoping this year would give us two such displays. Looks like we'll have to keep waiting.

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EbylHusker    478

I enjoyed Pan-STARRS, but yeah, it wasn't anything spectacular. Any comet is cool in my book, though. Even if it doesn't end up being the comet of the century some were predicting, if it survives the solar pass, it should still be pretty impressive.

 

On a lighter note...

 

frog-LADEE-launch-9-6-2013.jpg

 

http://www.universetoday.com/104679/absolutely-incredible-photo-frog-launches-with-ladee/

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EbylHusker    478

Theres a comet thats going to be visible to the naked sometime in november. I forget the name but that should be pretty coo.

That's ISON, and at this point, it's not living up to the hype. That could change, though, but for much at all to happen, it has to survive its close pass with the sun. And with such a close pass, nobody really knows if it will survive.

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MLB 51    893

Theres a comet thats going to be visible to the naked sometime in november. I forget the name but that should be pretty coo.

So you have to be naked in Novemeber to see it. :D

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